Computer Science Books for Kids

posted by: February 3, 2016 - 7:30am

Cover art for Ruby WizardryCover art for Adventures in PythonCover art for JavaScript for KidsLearning a new language is challenging, fun and rewarding. Some of the most useful languages a person can learn today are computer coding languages. Many people would be surprised to find that coding languages are not privy only to the extremely tech-savvy or even those who are math geniuses. In fact, even children can learn programming languages, and there are many great books to help introduce them to it. Children today are growing up intuitively knowing how to use technology. Take it a step further by introducing kids (or yourself) to the rewarding aspects of creating or making technology. Creating technology is the best way to fully understand how it works and how it affects our everyday lives. Each of these books explains how coding can be creative, artistic, exciting and engaging. Although they are targeted for children, these books can easily be read by adults who want a true beginner’s approach to computer science. The only materials needed to learn each of these languages are a computer with a working Internet browser and an eagerness to start coding!


Ruby is a programming language that is very easy for people to understand. Ruby Wizardry by Eric Weinstein explains how coding languages are like the translator between human language and computer language. Sometimes languages are very easy for a computer to understand, but difficult for humans to understand and vice versa. With Ruby, each line of code is easy for both humans and computers to understand. Weinstein explains that Ruby is so easy to read, writing Ruby code is just like writing a story. He formats his book into a story about two kids helping a king organize his kingdom through the magical power of code. The analogies in his story help explain more complicated computer science theories and concepts. For example, he uses a story about a broken pipe in the king’s castle to explain how computers can be coded with conditional statements to respond to various outcomes. The book is entertaining to work through because of the storylines and a great introduction to coding in general.


Similarly to Ruby, Python is also good for kids to learn because it is easy to read. It can be used for creating games, building websites, analyzing data and more. Craig Richardson’s book Adventures in Python is organized more like a textbook for slightly older kids. Each project in this book is arranged by adventure, and each adventure covers a different aspect of the Python language. The projects get steadily more difficult as you work through the book, with each adventure building on concepts covered in the previous section. To begin, you use Python coding to create text and drawings that use Python’s built-in turtle module. Eventually, you use these skills in another module called PyGame, and the book concludes with building an interactive, two-player game. It definitely takes time and patience to work through, but Python is an exceedingly useful language and the book’s “adventure” structure makes it approachable and fun.


While Ruby and Python are two very well-known and useful languages, JavaScript is one of the most popular and widely used language among programmers today. JavaScript for Kids for Dummies by Chris Minnick and Eva Holland is a wonderful introduction not only to JavaScript, but programming in general. The book asks for only a few things: that you can use a mouse and keyboard and that you have a working Internet connection and web browser. JavaScript is used for webpages, so the book takes the reader into Google Chrome’s console to show exactly how it works. Those already familiar with blogging and designing their own webpages will recognize how JavaScript works with HTML and CSS. However, even if you have never heard of HTML or CSS in your life, the book explains all concepts truly from a beginner’s perspective. JavaScript is slightly more difficult to read than Ruby or Python, but the book’s use of pictures and screenshots make it easy to see if you’re on the right track.


No matter which language or book you choose, you will gain a better perspective on how technology and computers work. Computer science can be a daunting topic, but these colorful, youth-oriented books make it approachable for anyone!


Indoor Activities for Kids

posted by: January 11, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Curious Kid’s Science BookCover art for In Good TasteCover art for Paper ManiaAs the weather gets colder and the snow days start piling up, you may find yourself wondering what to do with your children now that they are stuck indoors more than usual. No need to sit them down in front of the television or computer — here are some great activity books for kids that are sure to alleviate their boredom and inspire their creativity.


The Curious Kid’s Science Book by Asia Citro encourages children to develop a scientific curiosity about the world around them. Citro points out that children are naturally inclined to ask questions about the way things work, making them “born scientists.” A science teacher herself, Citro reassures parents that the experiments in the book aren’t complicated and don’t need to be executed perfectly in order to have value — the main purpose of the experiments is to show kids how to use the scientific method and develop scientific skills. The book is divided into simple topics such as “plants and seeds,” “water and ice” and other concepts that introduce children to the basics of biology, chemistry, physics and even engineering. This book is great for parents of 4-7 year olds who want their children to start developing science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills early in their education.


Do you have a budding chef or a young Martha Stewart on your hands? In Good Taste by Mari Bolte is filled with fun recipes that kids can put together and package with style to give as great holiday gifts. Bolte encourages kids to be creative with their presentation and packaging as that is often what makes a gift go from being ordinary to extraordinary. Some of the gifts include pickles in decorated mason jars, homemade marshmallows wrapped in colorful cellophane and ribbon and bouquets of fruit cut into decorative shapes. She also includes a section at the end where multiple gifts from the book can be combined into themed gift baskets. This book is best for slightly older children in middle grades with an aptitude for cooking and an eye for aesthetic appeal.


For parents whose children are more interested in arts and crafts, Paper Mania by Amanda Formaro has a variety of projects for kids of all ages and skill levels. The projects include everything paper: from simple paper airplanes to magazine collages and mosaics, from toilet paper tube marble racetracks to papier-mâché masks and decoupage. Children will develop their skills with cutting, weaving, pasting, measuring, folding, coloring and more. Formaro is a mother and blogger who has been crafting with children for years. Her blog,, includes projects for both adults and kids — so parents can join in on the crafting fun too!


Wanderlust for Beginners

posted by: April 16, 2013 - 8:05am

Flight 1-2-3The World Is Waiting for YouHeading out on a lifetime of adventures is considered in two new books for young readers. Flight 1-2-3, written and illustrated by Maria van Lieshout, is an ultra-clear counting book featuring the people and activities found at an airport. Intentionally using a typeface that is used in airport signage worldwide, the sleek, digitally-created images allow for first-time flyers to experience this new setting calmly and without fear. Perfect as an introduction to this often unfamiliar place, it covers elevators, security agents, and the gates, along with other concepts that a young child will encounter in the terminal and concourses.


Barbara Kerley’s The World is Waiting for You, full of incredible National Geographic photos, is truly a young explorer’s dream. This photo essay encourages the young and young-at-heart to follow whatever path they might choose. While many books focus on inner journeys, this is one that strongly pushes for literal treks. The text presses the reader to tackle apathy and laziness, and push forward to “climb”, “soar”, or even “poke around for a while”. Kerley, author of other National Geographic titles such as One World, One Day and A Cool Drink of Water, is a former Peace Corps volunteer whose belief in sharing the world with kids shines through. Photo credits and inspirational quotes complete the book, which will likely inspire young readers to see the featured places themselves.


Count Me In

posted by: August 1, 2012 - 8:11am

Help Me Learn Numbers 0-20Let's Count to 100!How Many Jelly Beans?Teaching children about numbers is fun for the whole family with these three playful and interactive counting books that will appeal to kids and caretakers alike!


Jean Marzollo created Help Me Learn Numbers 0-20 based on the Common Core State Standards used in many public schools. She says that the purpose of the book is to help children begin to learn about math at an early age and to help prepare them to succeed in Kindergarten. The eye-catching illustrations and rhyming text make it an engaging way for kids to learn. Help Me Learn Numbers 0-20 will be an asset for parents helping their children master these basic skills.  It is the first book in Marzollo’s Help Me Learn series, which now includes Help Me Learn Addition and Help Me Learn Subtraction.


Let’s Count to 100! by Masayuke Sebe is another charming counting book with great kid and parent appeal. Each page-spread has 100 items and includes challenges for kids to interact with the items in the illustrations.  The placement and colors of animals on the page lend themselves to counting by ones or by tens.


In Andrea Menotti’s fun, oversized picture book How Many Jelly Beans?, two siblings debate how many jelly beans they want. On every page-spread, the numbers multiply, ending with the siblings asking for 1 million jelly beans! How Many Jelly Beans? is a fun starting point for kids to begin to visualize large numbers. The black and white illustrations of the siblings make the colorful jelly beans pop off the page. This book will definitely grab kids’ attention.

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