posted by: November 5, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for Stand-OffStand-Off by Andrew Smith, the sequel to the acclaimed Winger, starts off with our hero, Ryan Dean West, about to return to his prestigious (if strict) boarding school Pine Mountain Academy as the school’s first 15-year-old graduating senior. Along with the normal doubts and insecurity his relative youth to his senior classmates would bring, he feels overwhelmed by the enthusiasm of his bright-eyed 12-year-old roommate Sam Abernathy. Sam’s relentless chipperness is more oppressive than endearing, and to make matters worse, he suffers from extreme claustrophobia that could send him into a panic if conditions aren’t just perfect. Normally warm and friendly, Ryan Dean begins to push friends new and old away, refusing advice from his girlfriend, honor from his Rugby coach and friendship from Sam, who reminds him a little too much of himself three short years ago. The real crux of Ryan Dean’s pain, however, is dealing with the trauma of the previous year, the chillingly real terrors that plague him night and day that force him to accept grief, resolution and humility.


Andrew Smith’s first person storytelling is warm, direct and effortless. Ryan Dean comes to life in voice as well as in visuals. Sam Bosma accompanies Smith’s prose with illustrations and comics crafted to fit Ryan Dean’s voice, which takes the storytelling to a new level. A read of Winger first is a must for this excellent, fast-paced sequel. Lovers of imaginative but ultimately down-to-earth and realistic fiction of all levels will find themselves exhilarated, heart-broken and lost in these two books.


So Cute It Hurts!!

posted by: October 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for So Cute It Hurts!!

After working on her last series for four years, mangaka — that’s someone who writes and illustrates manga — Go Ikeyamada has a super-fun and adorable new series called So Cute It Hurts!! The first volume of So Cute It Hurts!! follows identical twins Megumu and Mitsuru Kobayashi as they meet their first real high school crushes at the same time. Apparently, it’s a twin thing.


Megumu, or Mego for short, is a hapless history otaku who knows everything about Japan’s feudal warlords. Mitsuru is really good with a kendo sword and fights for his school team, but he’s even better with the ladies from the visiting schools. While his body is agile, his mind is not so sharp, and he’s bombing his history class. Knowing that his sis is well-versed in Japanese lore, he asks her to swap clothes with him and go to his all-boys school to take a test and save his grade. Mego likes her brother, but not enough to agree to such a hackneyed scheme.


When she wakes up the next day, Mego finds a wig and a note from Mitsuru in her room and realizes that he’s already absconded with her books and school uniform. Begrudgingly, she equips his slacks and hoodie and heads to his school, only to be accosted by the third toughest guy in the entire student body. Meanwhile, Mitsuru, dressed as Mego — “I’m so cute it hurts!!” — witnesses the class beauty tormenting a girl for being different, and can’t help but intervene. Neither Kobayashi twin realizes they’re about to meet the person of their dreams, but as their school days progress they draw closer to the fateful encounters that’ll leave them breathless and starry-eyed.


So Cute It Hurts!! is filled with lots of manga in-jokes that fans of the medium will appreciate, but newcomers will still laugh out loud at the silliness of the plot and the situations in which the twins find themselves. Ikeyamada’s art mixes traditional anime styles with adorable chibi stand-ins on nearly every page, giving the story a very light-hearted feel. So Cute It Hurts!! is shaping up to be a great teenaged romantic comedy that manga fans should definitely check out.




Who’s Ready for an Audrey Hepburn Marathon?

posted by: December 9, 2014 - 7:00am

Being Audrey HepburnOh Yeah, Audrey!The icon of timeless style for the 20th century, Audrey Hepburn has left a legacy of grace and compassion through her movies, her images and her work with UNICEF. Young adult publishers have picked up on the popularity of all-things-Audrey with the publication of two novels this fall, Being Audrey Hepburn by Mitchell Kriegman and Oh Yeah, Audrey! by Tucker Shaw.


“Here’s the big secret—Audrey Hepburn is the cure for everything,” says Lisbeth, a bored 19-year-old New Jersey diner waitress in Being Audrey Hepburn. Audrey fans and those who remember Kriegman’s classic Nickelodeon sitcom Clarissa Explains It All will cheer as Lisbeth gets into some wild escapades. Stuck meeting the demands of her alcoholic mother and explosive older sister, Lisbeth spends quality time by herself in a hall closet watching Breakfast at Tiffany’s on a loop and writing a fashion blog titled “Shades of Limelight.” The only people she can depend on for support are her best friend Jess and her grandmother, Nan, who shares her love of Audrey.


When Jess needs help at her job at the Met, she rewards Lisbeth with a glimpse of one of the most iconic dresses ever worn: the black Givenchy dress Holly Golightly dons at the open of Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Begging and pleading with Jess, Lisbeth puts on the dress and finds herself at the Met gala. Suddenly, she’s the mysterious It-Girl on Page Six. Pop stars and fashion designers are blowing up her phone with text messages. Her humble fashion blog goes viral. Paparazzi are snapping pictures of her everywhere. Can Lisbeth keep herself grounded in her new-found fame, or will she forget her real friends for a chance to be in the spotlight?


In Oh Yeah, Audrey!, teen Gemma Beasley has landed in New York City for the weekend of her life, chock-full of Audrey-inspired events and recreating some of the most famous scenes from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The author of a popular Audrey Tumblr called “Oh Yeah, Audrey!,” she sets out to finally meet some of her best Internet friends in person: the flamboyant Brian, the sarcastic Trina and even Telly, who trolls the site. But when Gemma meets up with Dusty, a handsome “almost” stranger, he promises her something more special than just an ode to her favorite icon: a chance to wear one of Audrey’s dresses from the film. Will Gemma abandon her friends and her grand plans to spend her weekend with mysterious Dusty, or will she continue with the careful itinerary she put together for the best weekend of her life?


Reading these books is a must for all Audrey obsessives and a wonderful companion for your own Audrey Hepburn movie marathon night. BCPL's collection feature many Audrey Hepburn's most iconic films on DVD, so pick up a few of your favorites, put on your little black dress and enjoy.



Wooly Bully

posted by: November 5, 2014 - 6:00am

Cover art for Bad Machinery: The Case of the Good Boy by John AllisonThere was a time when child sleuths were all the rage, when Nate the Great, Encyclopedia Brown, the Hardy Boys and Tom Swift solved crime along with just being kids. John Allison has brought mystery solving-teens back, and they are wittier than ever. Bad Machinery: The Case of the Good Boy is based on a the daily "Bad Machinery webcomic. It's girls vs. boys as babies go missing and any number of large, hairy beasties may or may not be invading the neighborhood.


Representing the girls, there's Lottie, all attitude and puff jackets. Shauna is the brains. Mildred has just found an incredibly large, friendly dog who just so happens to drink from a cup.


On the boys' side, there is Linton, most notable for a profound lack of tact. Jack is the quiet one who attracts the ladies. Sonny is sort of like a human Golden Retriever.


John Allison once described his writing style as word mangling, and it starts with the very first page.


"It's perfectly natural for babies to be out in nature, Carol!"
"The babies are getting quite dirty."
"Stop FUSSING and help me make their gruel."


It's all sideways from there, as bullies, scouting, stinky younger siblings, and dogless families are navigated. There's a missing magic pencil and a case of arson. Everything is bounced through at a well-measured pace. Allison has been writing comics in this universe for well over a decade now, and he knows exactly what he wants to do with every panel. The art looks intentionally rough and energetic.


While the main story is found online, the book ends with six pages of supplemental material that won't be found anywhere else. They're the perfect, silly complement to an already high-quality print.

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