The Leaving

posted by: September 28, 2016 - 12:00pm

Cover art for The LeavingOn the front cover of The Leaving by Tara Altebrando, a quote from a bestselling author is highlighted: “You will not sleep, check your phone, or even breathe once you begin reading…” Skeptical at first, I felt those were pretty high standards to be placed directly in clear view of the reader. However, after finishing the book in less than five hours, I can say with confidence that this one that will have you hooked from the first page.

 

A tragedy occurs in a Florida beach community, and the town never fully recovers. Six kindergarten children go missing and, 11 years later, five return with no memory of where they have been. Now 16 years of age, mystery surrounds the return of the teens, and many in town question the motives behind this “miracle.”

 

Altebrando takes the readers into a kaleidoscope of interpreting memory loss through visual cues and a creative use of text. Different points of view guide us through the agonizing process of recovering memories. The words come to life and will take the reader into the minds of the main characters. As the story unfolds, you realize that the town is connected in more ways than you imagined, and that many questions are unanswered.

 

In the end, what stands out the most are the who and why, which will be gnawing at you throughout the story. If you are looking for a fast-paced teen fiction that will constantly have you on edge, go straight to the BCPL catalog and request this today. The only regret I have after reading this book is that it doesn’t have a sequel.

 


 
 

How to Hang a Witch

posted by: September 21, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for How to Hang a WitchBeing the new girl in high school can be rough for any teenager. But in Adriana Mather’s book How to Hang a Witch, Samantha Mather has more than prom dates and homework to worry about. With the setting in Salem, Massachusetts, and the last name of a person infamously connected to the Salem witch trials, it automatically brands her as being the bad apple in town.

 

Since the late 1600s, Salem has become synonymous with the hysteria of witchcraft and the “hanging of a witch.” A few names stand out during this time period as either being the accuser or the accused. Take a peek into how the descendants of these key players will play a pivotal role in the story and whether history repeats itself in this engaging tale. Adriana Mather does a great job of exploring the deadly consequences of peer pressure and bullying that teen audiences will relate to.

 

If you have an interest in this part of history or supernatural teen fiction, than you may want to check out this enjoyable read. If the title alone doesn't grab your attention than the last name of the author will, as she is related to the controversial figure of this story from colonial times. In the end, Mather creates a modern twist which parallels the lessons learned from this important part of history. Mix in a pinch of young love, some witchcraft, a generous amount of mystery, and a 300-year-old McDreamy ghost, and you have a recipe for a page-turner that will be finished in one sitting.

 

Teen readers with an interest in this time period may also enjoy the novel in verse Wicked Girls: A Novel of the Salem Witch Trials by Stephanie Hemphill.


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The Light Fantastic

posted by: September 8, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Light FantasticThe Light Fantastic by Sarah Combs unfolds over three climactic hours on April Donovan’s 18th birthday. It’s April 19, 2013. The Boston Marathon bombers are still on the loose, and April recalls a litany of other horrific events that have taken place in her birth month — Oklahoma City, Waco, Columbine, Virginia Tech. April suffers from a rare memory condition that leaves her able to remember events from her past in exquisite detail, to make connections that most people wouldn’t notice.

 

April’s story is just one of seven threads in this engrossing, interwoven novel. What’s happening at April’s high school in Delaware? What’s happening with her childhood friend, Lincoln, now living in Nebraska, who moved away after his father died in the attack on the Twin Towers? How are they connected to a girl in Idaho and a boy in California?

 

Each story contains echoes of the others, and these coincidences and small repetitions are part of the beauty of the novel. These people and their stories are connected because everything is connected. It may not feel like it sometimes, but we are never alone in this world.

 

For more of Combs’ fiction, check out her debut Breakfast Served Anytime. For another story with an unorthodox structure about a heavy topic, check out John Darnielle’s Wolf in White Van.

 


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10 New TV Series with Book Tie-Ins

posted by: August 31, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Marvelous Land of OzCover art for The ExorcistCover art for A Series of Unfortunate EventsAs summer winds down, we look forward to cooler weather, pumpkin-flavored everything and fall television premiers! If you’re like me and you need to read the book before you watch it on screen, here are 10 new series premiering this television season based on books.

 

Hulu’s Chance, based on the book by Kem Nunn, is a psychological thriller set in San Francisco about a psychiatrist, his female patient with multiple personality disorder and her homicide detective husband.

 

NBC’s Emerald City is a modern reimagining of L. Frank Baum’s Land of Oz series featuring 20-year-old Dorothy Gale and a K9 police dog.

 

Fox’s The Exorcist, based on the 1971 novel by William Peter Blatty, follows a new family’s fight against demonic possession.

 

Amazon’s Good Girls Revolt is based on the true story of author Lynn Povich and 45 other women who sued Newsweek for sex discrimination in 1970.

 

Hulu’s The Handmaid's Tale is based on the classic dystopian novel by Margaret Atwood.

 

NBC’s Midnight, Texas is a supernatural drama based on the series by Charlaine Harris — also the author of the Sookie Stackhouse books which formed the basis for HBO’s True Blood.

 

NBC’s Powerless is a workplace comedy about an insurance company set in the DC Comics Universe.

 

CW’s Riverdale is a live-action teen drama based on the characters from Archie Comics, celebrating its 75th anniversary this year.

 

Netflix’s A Series of Unfortunate Events is based on the children’s series by Lemony Snicket about three orphaned siblings.

 

ABC’s Still Star-Crossed, based on the teen novel by Melinda Taub, features the Montagues and Capulets in the aftermath of Romeo and Juliet’s tragic deaths.


 
 

The Way Back to You

posted by: July 11, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Way Back to You Six months after Ashlyn Montiel dies in a bicycling accident, her best friend Cloudy and her boyfriend Kyle are still reeling in The Way Back to You by Michelle Andreani and Mindi Scott. Kyle copes with his grief by quitting the baseball team and adopting a feral kitten that he maybe suspects might be Ashlyn reincarnated. Cloudy copes with her grief by not coping with it.

 

Cloudy learns that Ashlyn’s parents have been in contact with a few of the recipients of Ashlyn’s donated organs. When her parents go out of town for winter break, she takes advantage of their absence and embarks on a top secret road trip to visit them and somehow make sense of her friend’s tragic death. And who better to invite on the road trip than Kyle — the one person who understands exactly how much she misses Ashlyn?

 

To complicate things, Cloudy had a crush on Kyle for months before she knew Ashlyn was interested in him. And after she made a fool of herself in front of Kyle when he and Ashlyn were together, things have been awkward. Hours and hours alone together in a car? Definitely going to be awkward.

 

Beginning with a little boy’s play and ending with a young woman’s Las Vegas wedding, with detours to visit family and friends who know them better than anyone (or at least should know them from a stranger on the street), Cloudy and Kyle confront their feelings — about Ashlyn’s death and about each other.

 

Scott is the author of two previous novels including Freefall and contributed to the collection Violent Ends, while this is Andreani’s debut. The duo met in an online writing class and exchanged thousands of emails, texts and Tweets while co-writing The Way Back to You. They chronicled their experiences over the past four years on their website.   


 
 

The End of FUN

posted by: July 6, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The End of FUNAaron O'Faolain has a lot of problems right now. He just got expelled and his parents are divorced and inattentive, which is how he managed to scam them all by dropping out of his new school and going to live on the streets of San Francisco. Only that didn't work as well as he was expecting. This is The End of FUN by Sean McGinty.

 

To make some quick cash, Aaron signs up to test out the latest product from FUN®! — Tickle, Tickle, Boom!, an anticipated virtual reality platform that integrates social media, gaming and online marketing. After spending a month doing nothing but playing, he owes $10,000 and a virus in the software is giving him tiny seizures. To get out of his contract he has to pay back the money he owes and collect enough YAY!s to meet his user agreement. Luckily for him, his grandfather just died and left him as the sole beneficiary —  if he can solve the treasure hunt his grandfather stipulated in his will. Debut author McGinty breathes new life into the cyperpunk genre with this sardonic spin on Young Adult archetypes, setting his narrative in the midst of multiple concurrent global catastrophes, rather than in a post-apocalyptic world. Aaron begrudgingly (and sometimes unwittingly) embarks on a multi-tiered quest that has him searching for material wealth, spiritual fulfillment and rectified relationships, although not actually saving the world. Fans of Holes, Ready Player One and The Westing Game will appreciate this nuanced and realistic story that is completely fun.

 

Liz

Liz

 
 

Lucky Penny

posted by: July 5, 2016 - 7:00am

Lucky PennyPenny has the worst luck. She lost her job and her apartment on the same day and now her best friend Helen is moving to Long Island. But she'll be okay! She is resourceful and obtusely optimistic. Plus, Helen got her a job interview at her family's laundromat, which is where Penny bides her time, fighting off the neighborhood delinquents and trying to figure out how to move forward under the watchful glower of her new petty dictator of a boss. To stay clean, she scams showers from the cute nerd working at the gym next door. Despite the fact that their dates are disastrous and their interests are wildly divergent, Penny develops a real infatuation for Walter. But can their relationship survive Penny's contretemps? What about the villains waiting in the shadows, plotting Penny's downfall?

 

Lucky Penny by Ananth Hirsh and Yuko Ota is a book that revels in the absurdity of everyday life and in absurdly dramatic climaxes. Fans of Scott Pilgrim and 500 Days of Summer will find this a romantic-comedy of errors that is sweet without being saccharine, funny without being trivial. Originally serialized as a webcomic, you can find Easter eggs detailing the hilarious romance novels adorning Penny's shelves, Penny's bad advice blog, as well as more comics by Ota and Hirsh (a couple in real life) at their website Johnny Wander.

Liz

Liz

 
 

Wink Poppy Midnight

posted by: June 6, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Wink Poppy MidnightWink Poppy Midnight is original and utterly enchanting. April Genevieve Tucholke casts a spell over readers that will hold them in thrall until the last page.

 

The author reminds the readers that, like soups, all stories start with the same key ingredients. Every cohesive story has a hero, a villain and a secret. In this dark mystery, readers are never really sure who is who. Each chapter is alternately narrated by the three title characters and, as the story progresses, readers are less sure of who to trust.

 

For far too long, Midnight has been in love with Poppy, the gorgeous girl next door. Though he knows all too well that she is as cruel as she is beautiful, he has never been able to shake her control over him. Now that he and his father have moved to an old house outside of town, perhaps he will truly be able to get over Poppy. Midnight now finds himself living next to the eccentric Bell family. Everyone in town whispers that their mother is a witch because she tells fortunes from tea leaves and reads tarot cards. The kids run wild, and Midnight is drawn to their stories and games. Wink Bell, with her crazy red hair, freckles and overalls is the exact opposite of Poppy, and perhaps that is exactly what Midnight wants after all.

 

Don’t be tempted to label Wink Poppy Midnight a teen book with a mandatory love triangle. The characters feel variations of love, but it is more of a dark, mysterious fairy tale than a romance. The characters are complex and quirky. The writing is beautiful and smart. Tucholke seems to be spinning us a yarn with a sly smile on her face, trusting that her readers will get it and be delighted in the strangeness of it. Needless to say, I was.

 


 
 

The Girl from Everywhere

posted by: May 18, 2016 - 7:00am

The Girl from EverywhereTime-traveling pirates? Count me in. Heidi Heilig has offered up just such delicious fare with The Girl from Everywhere, the first installment in her new teen series.

 

Nix, whose father is the captain of The Temptation, has grown up on the ship traveling to any far-flung place in time they happen to have a map for, including magical and mythological locales. The eccentric crew members are the closest thing she has to family. But, one place always beckons her father back — the place where he lost Nix’s mother. If he could get back, perhaps he could save her.

 

Time travel has rules, however. The crew can never use the same map twice, and the map must be an original reflection of the place in time it was created. While the captain would do anything to get his hands on a usable map of 1868 Honolulu, it is hard to find one that will actually work.

 

To acquire a potentially usable map, the crew will have to pull more than one major heist. Since piracy is never as simple as it sounds, they must also deal with unforeseen obstacles along the way.

 

Nix’s complex relationship with her father is especially compelling, though there are also hints of romance. Nix’s best friend aboard the ship may have deeper feelings, and she also meets an enigmatic stranger who will test her loyalties to the ship and the crew.

 

Heilig, a native Hawaiian, ties in a surprising amount of actual history concerning the island at this pivotal time in its history, and her descriptions of the place, the people and the food are magical.

 

Readers who enjoy this book should check out Unhooked by Lisa Maxwell, The Love That Split the World by Emily Henry and Passenger by Alexandra Bracken.


 
 

Children of the Sea

posted by: March 28, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Children of the SeaChildren of the Sea is at times about the ocean, at times about the power of myth and spirits, at times about young people trying to discover themselves and their needs. One thing it is always, from the first page to the last panel, is breathtakingly magical.

 

Ruka’s summer isn’t looking so great. She has few friends, and her relationship with her parents is strained. Her moments of peace and clarity come from visiting the aquarium where her father works, gazing into the tanks and slowly sensing the life force of the sea creatures as it transforms into glowing lights right before her eyes. Her meditation is interrupted one day, however, when a young boy appears in the tank she’d been gazing at — completely out of place and yet exactly at home, somehow.

 

The boy who at first appeared to be a mystical creature is Umi, a ward of the aquarium while his scientist caretaker works on research there. Along with his more mysterious, reserved brother Sora, Umi takes Ruka out to the ocean, which has become more of their natural habitat than the land most humans walk. As she swims with Sora and Umi, they become friends, but the mystery of their nature and their strangely aquatic bodies becomes more complex. Ruka finds herself determined to help her new friends.

 

Soft, mystical and deeply gorgeous, Children of the Sea is a work of art to be dwelled over page by page. Igarashi’s storytelling makes full use of his stylistic yet depth-oriented illustration, taking the reader on an impossibly immersive journey to the bottom of the sea.


 
 

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