Cover Art for Artemis Cover Art for Autonomous Cover Art for The Salt Line

Artemis by Andy Weir 

With over 3.5 million copies of his bestselling debut The Martian in print, following that up will be no small task  but Weir seems up to the challenge. Artemis is a heist story set in a city on the Moon with the story and technology very much set in the real world. It's sure to be enjoyed by science fiction and non-science fiction readers alike.  

 

Autonomous by Annalee Newitz 

Newitz is the founder of io9, a popular science and sci-fi blog, and the former editor-in-chief of Gizmodo. Her eagerly anticipated debut features a swashbuckling pharmaceutical pirate and a robot who fall in love while racing to end a drug epidemic. Is freedom possible in a culture where everything, even people, can be owned?

Salt Line by Holly Goddard Jones  

A literary dystopian novel where the United States’ borders have receded behind a salt line that protects its citizens from deadly disease carrying ticks. Few venture outside of the safe zone, except for those willing to pay a fortune to see what is left of nature. The novel follows one of those groups on an adventure outside the border and at the center of a murderous plot.
 


 
 

Debut Writers to Watch

posted by: July 26, 2017 - 7:00am

Ayobami Adebayo's Stay With Me is sure to do just that, stay with you, long after reading it. The book is set in Nigeria and is a he said/she said story of a couple whose marriage is in crisis due to her inability to conceive, infidelity and tradition. To save her marriage, Yejide finally gets pregnant, but at what cost?

 

Cover Art of The Half Drowned King If you enjoy Game of Thrones and Vikings, you are sure to enjoy The Half-Drowned King by Linnea Hartsuyker. This is the first in a planned trilogy and is based in Norse history. Ragnvald Eysteinsonn has been betrayed and left for dead by his stepfather's men. In order to regain his birthright, Ragnvald allies himself to Harald of Vestfold, a young warrior who is the prophesied King of Norway.

 

Debut novelist Brendan Mathews brings us a sweeping, historical fiction featuring the Dempsey brothers, who make their way from Ireland to America after stealing money from the IRA. Set in 1939 pre-war New York, The World of Tomorrow takes us from Harlem jazz clubs to Bowery mobster warehouses to the Plaza Hotel as the Dempsey brothers struggle in their new found home.

 

Cover art for My Absolute Darling Gabriel Tallent's coming of age story brings us 14-year-old Turtle, who lives an isolated life in northern California with her abusive father. In My Absolute Darling, Turtle longs to free herself from her father and, after befriending Jacob, she begins to imagine a world out from under her father's repressive dominance.

 

 

 


 
 

Normal

posted by: March 22, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for NormalWarren Ellis has a dark view of the future, and he wants to give you the inside scoop. In his newest book Normal, the prolific author of dozens of graphic novels shares his creepy and worryingly plausible view of the future of surveillance and technology in the world.

 

The book begins at Normal Head, an isolated facility in the Pacific Northwest. Normal is where futurists, people whose job it is to look forward and prepare for catastrophes, go to recover when the pressures of their jobs drive them to depression, exhaustion and madness. The protagonist is a newly arrived patient who investigates a strange disappearance of another patient at the facility.

 

While not being an uplifting tale, the book does present an interesting take on where the future of technology may head. Normal is almost more an education on problems humanity may face in the future than a story. It stares unblinkingly at a future that the reader may feel is implausible, but can’t entirely dismiss as impossible. Though it sounds grim, the book is full of memorable and funny — if bizarre — characters, each defined by their quirks and their fears.

 

Overall the book is a great read, especially for fans of speculative, near-future sci-fi. Not truly dystopian, it shows how we got from present day to a world destroyed. Normal is weird and quirky and dark but ultimately delightful.

 

Readers who enjoyed this are also likely to enjoy some of Ellis’ other works, such as Trees, a graphic novel set in a near future where our world has been irrevocably changed by massive technological columns (the titular Trees) from space. They might also enjoy Transmetropolitan, another graphic novel by Ellis that is set in the full on dystopian future, though that series is a good deal more crude and adult than this book. For something a little more hopeful, though no less dark, readers could also try Little Brother by Cory Doctorow. This book, also set in the near future, discusses the dangers of government surveillance through the eyes of a teenager living in San Francisco in the wake of a terrorist attack.

 


 
 

The Wanderers

posted by: March 13, 2017 - 7:00am

The WanderersIn Meg Howrey’s The Wanderers, the first mission to Mars is approaching. Helen, Yoshi and Sergei are a team of astronauts that want to be chosen for the mission. But first, the team must be successful in a 17–month-long simulation on Earth — proving they are the right team that is prepared for any challenges. Though the astronauts believe they are on Earth in an eerily realistic simulation, they begin to question if everything is real or not.

 

Howrey thoroughly explores the relationships of the astronauts to the people in their lives and to each other. Helen, Yoshi and Sergei demonstrate how the life choice of being an astronaut affects themselves and those around them. Helen feels that she may not have been and continues not to be the mother her daughter, Mireille, needed her to be. Dmitri, Sergei’s son, hides how he truly feels and behaves from his father. Yoshi’s wife, Madoka, believes her husband doesn’t know who she really is and that it would destroy their marriage.

 

Though this story seems very much like one about the first mission to Mars, it really isn’t at all. This is a story about humanity. It’s about the way the astronauts and the people in their lives are affected by the demanding and adventurous life of an astronaut. It’s about the urge to travel into space and what it is really like once you have been in space. Howrey’s beautiful language and view into the personal thoughts of this group of people make The Wanderers an intriguing and charming read.


 
 

The Expanse

posted by: January 31, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Babylon's AshesThe writing team styled as James S.A. Corey picks up the ever complex interplanetary politics and resulting war without missing a beat in book six of The Expanse series. Longtime fans of the series will enjoy the return of many characters from previous books in the newest installment, Babylon’s Ashes.

 

The spaceship Rocinante’s crew is reunited for a drawn-out debriefing on Luna Base. Captain Holden and company ship out under former Martian Marine Bobbie Draper’s command to help coordinate what remains of the joint fleet from Earth and Mars, as well as the unaligned OPA factions, to put a stop to Marco’s plans.

 

The complex tribal nature of the Belt is given a hefty portion of the storytelling though the voices of Naomi, Dawes, Pa, Prax, Filip and Marco. Corey devotes time into exploring the poisonous father-son relationship between Marco and Filip, as well as Naomi’s guilt for sacrificing her son to Marco’s control. One of the most striking moments of the book occurs when Filip has an important realization about his father.

 

If you are new to the novels that precede the sixth installment, make sure to get started with Leviathan Wakes, or check out season one of The Expanse before the next season starts back up on February 1.


 
 

Ninth City Burning

posted by: November 14, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Ninth City BurningNinth City Burning by J. Patrick Black is the first installment of a new series that takes an exciting and refreshing approach to the aliens attacking Earth story. Set 500 years in the future, the people of Earth have been in a grinding war with a mysterious alien species. With them came the mysterious force of "thelemity", which they brought to use as a weapon. Luckily, humans found that they could use thelemity too.

 

Black introduces us to a variety of characters that, through their multiple viewpoints, build up this multifaceted and detail-rich story. Jax is a 12-year-old "fontani", someone who can use the mysterious element of thelemity and plays an important part in the defense of the Ninth City. Torro is a factory worker in a settlement of the Ninth City who is chosen in a sudden draft for the war. Naomi and Rae are sisters that travel and live outside of the city who end up becoming much more important to the Ninth City than they could have known. Though these are just a few of the characters who lend their viewpoints, we learn the truths of the war and their part in it as each of them train and prepare for battle.

 

Black’s future Earth is wonderfully imagined with sharp attention to detail. Many things aren’t what you think they are initially, and the twists in the story add an air of mystery that I was not expecting. Lovers of science fiction and fantasy will find Ninth City Burning intriguing and intense in the best possible way. Be sure to keep an eye out for the rest of the series.


 
 

Paper Girls

posted by: October 27, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Paper GirlsIf you tore through Netflix’s Stranger Things as quickly as I did and are craving more nostalgia-inducing science fiction, look no further than Paper Girls. Created by an all-star team including Brian K. Vaughan of Saga fame and Cliff Chiang, the artist behind Wonder Woman, Paper Girls is a coming-of-age story that reads like the twisted result of a partnership between John Hughes and John Carpenter.

 

Four preteen newspaper delivery girls trying to make their rounds early the morning after Halloween are met with hurdles in the form of costumed bullies, overbearing local police and mysterious masked figures with secrets aplenty. Those familiar with Vaughan’s work will recognize his signature oddball brand of science fiction here; the truly bizarre is interwoven with the ordinary in a way that brings out the best in both. The interactions between the paper girls and the surreal and strange characters they meet result in some of the snappiest dialogue I’ve ever read; this pre-teen gang genuinely feel like they fell right out of your favorite '80s movie and into this book.

 

Cliff Chiang reunites with colorist Matt Wilson here to create a truly dreamy nostalgic landscape. The almost flat pastel colors lend an ethereal air to the whole book; even the scenes that are grounded in reality have a certain otherworldliness to them that is well suited for the tone of the book.

 

Grab yourself a Crystal Pepsi, put on John Carpenter’s Lost Themes and prepare to get weird.

 


 
 

Stiletto

posted by: September 27, 2016 - 12:00pm

Cover art for StilettoSpies. Monsters. Super powers. And…bureaucratic humor? In Stiletto, Daniel O’Malley delivers a riveting novel that covers all of the above and more. A follow up to his smash hit The Rook, this novel delves deeper into the world of the Rookery, a covert agency in the English government that employs individuals with unusual abilities to protect their country from threats internal and external.

 

In this book, the Rookery is looking to make nice with an age old foe. But how do you join two groups, when both have been raised since time immemorial to despise the other? Old wounds are re-opened and loyalties are tested when these organizations are forced to confront very real threats to themselves, their colleagues and to England itself.

 

While modern fantasy/espionage/horror/office humor is a pretty niche sub-genre, Daniel O’Malley does a great job of making this book accessible to all audiences. Funny and insightful one moment, terrifying and tense the next, O’Malley seamlessly blends genres to keep the reader engaged from start to finish. He also does a great job of mining his premise for unexpected humor — at one point they discuss how a Gorgon was driven from England not by an armed assault, but by a series of increasingly withering tax audits.

 

A great read for fans of urban fantasy, this book has humor, heart and a few good scares in store for its readers. If you enjoy this book, you could also check out The Atrocity Archives by Charles Stross, another series about English spies defending crown and country from the supernatural while dealing with bureaucratic red tape. Urban fantasy fans might also enjoy Jim Butcher’s The Dresden Files; the first book in that series is Storm Front. It follows a modern day private investigator who also happens to be a wizard, mixing dry humor with thrilling action and some terrifying moments.

 


 
 

Night of the Animals

posted by: September 19, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Night of the AnimalsIn the year 2052, a comet is approaching the Earth, which has inspired a suicide cult called Heaven’s Gate to begin sacrificing animals. The cult believes that killing animals will help them achieve a “level above human.” Because of this, animals around the entire world face mass extinction. In Bill Broun’s Night of the Animals, one man named Cuthbert Handley believes he must free the animals of the London Zoo, one of the last remaining havens for animals, to save the animals themselves and all of humanity. Cuthbert is an indigent man in his 90s with a serious heart condition, an addiction to a hallucinogenic drug and a curious gift called the Wonderments, that allows him to communicate with animals.

 

During his mission to free the animals, Cuthbert experiences a variety of mixed emotions and thoughts, from wondering if he actually possesses the Wonderments to wondering if he’s just crazy and hallucinating, to hoping that he is just doing the right thing. Cuthbert’s struggle to deal with the consequences — good or bad — of his decisions leads to some in-depth pondering and philosophical discussions with some interesting animals. Will Cuthbert be successful in his mission? Will the night of the animals be everything he hoped?

 

Though the story revolves around the single night of Cuthbert’s mission, Broun takes us through Cuthbert’s life and what led him to this event. We learn that Cuthbert’s entire life has been difficult, from the disappearance of his older brother to being accepted by his parents to his present time, where he struggles more than ever. Cuthbert’s character is strongly developed and completely charming.

 

The dystopian world and science fiction details of Night of the Animals only highlight and emphasize the important aspects of the plot, Cuthbert’s struggle with humanity and the fate of the world. This detail-rich story draws you in, and will have you questioning everything until the end. You simply won’t want to put this exciting and adventurous book down. 


 
 

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