The Strivers' Row Spy

posted by: February 22, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Strivers' Row SpyJason Overstreet’s suspenseful debut transports readers to the dazzle and excitement of the 1920s Harlem Renaissance in The Strivers' Row Spy, the first entry in a promising mystery series. Sidney Temple is a recent college graduate on the brink of opportunity that even his bourgeois family could not have imagined. His impulsive marriage to artist Loretta brings him great happiness, but even more is in store for this bright young man.

 

J. Edgar Hoover, head of the FBI, hand-picks Sidney to be the FBI’s first African-American agent, and Sidney knows this is his chance to make a change and work for justice. The FBI is intent on bringing down Marcus Garvey, prominent head of the back-to-Africa movement. Sidney uses his previously unknown skills at deception and undercover work to thwart the Bureau’s investigation. And by giving renowned leader W.E.B. DuBois insider information, Sidney gambles on a change that could mean a fair future for all Americans.

 

As Sidney and Loretta climb into the most influential Harlem circles, the stakes become more perilous. Tragedy threatens to shatter Loretta’s trust in her husband, and Sidney’s double-life is dangerously precarious. Overstreet does a marvelous job of capturing the heady atmosphere of 1920s Harlem, and is so convincing in his storytelling that readers may forget this is all fiction and Sidney Temple never existed. Overstreet peppers his story with real historical figures from the ‘20s. Besides Hoover, DuBois and Garvey, Sidney also has encounters with James Weldon Johnson, Adam Clayton Powell and Max Eastman. Readers who enjoy spy stories or historical fiction will definitely find a new author to follow in Jason Overstreet.

 

Are you doing BCPL’s Reading Challenge? This would be a great one for February’s challenge. Don’t forget to take a picture of yourself with the book and submit your entry by visiting Facebook, Twitter or Instagram and post or tweet the photo with the hashtag #bwellread. Camera-shy participants may post a photograph of the book they’ve chosen.

 


 
 

Song of the Lion

posted by: February 1, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Song of the LionA deadly car bombing on a Navajo reservation sets in motion professional rivalries, intertribal tensions and an FBI investigation into possible eco-terrorism in Anne Hillerman’s Song of the Lion. Off-duty tribal officer Bernadette Manuelito is anticipating an epic battle between the current Shiprock High School basketball team and the old-time alumni seeking to recreate past glories. Instead, an explosion rocks the night, and Bernie is thrust into a miasma of fleeing spectators. In the parking lot lays the ruined remains of a BMW owned by the mediator of a multi-million dollar development intended for the Grand Canyon. Considering the highly controversial negotiations about to be conducted, it is assumed the mediator is the target of the attack. Bernie’s husband, tribal officer Jim Chee, is assigned to protect the very uncooperative potential murder victim.

 

 
While dozens of stakeholders plead their case for the future use of the land, sabotage threatens the hearings and tensions rise between the Hopi and Navajo tribes. As Bernie and Jim are drawn deeper into the case, what appears to be straightforward case against eco-terrorists becomes an investigation into a complex web of events buried deep in the past. Patiently plotting, this killer has waited a very long time to carry out his well-laid plans for revenge.

 

The sacred ground of the Grand Canyon provides the landscape for this latest entry in the Navajo detective series. Anne Hillerman proves herself a worthy keeper of the flame for her acclaimed father, Tony Hillerman. Like his, her writing is rich with the customs, lore and sacred myths of the Hopi and Navajo tribes. Readers of Craig Johnson, William Kent Krueger and Steve Hamilton will enjoy this haunting read.


 
 

The Clairvoyants

posted by: January 30, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for The ClairvoyantsKaren Brown won acclaim for her debut The Longings of Wayward Girls, a suspenseful novel about two missing girls. Although her new book, The Clairvoyants, is also billed as psychological suspense, it’s really more accurate to describe it as a coming-of-age story with dark, supernatural overtones.

 

Martha and her sister Del grow up on a farm in Connecticut. When Martha is only 7 years old, she has a vision of her great aunt. Unfortunately, her great aunt has already been dead for many years when they “meet.” As a child, Martha is only mildly disconcerted by the event. It seems to be an isolated, intriguing fluke. But in her late teens, a harrowing incident triggers her strange gift again. She begins experiencing more visions of the dead — most not as pleasant as her great aunt.

 

Hoping to leave the dead behind, Martha flees to college in Ithaca. There she finds romance with a brooding photographer named William. But her idyll is disrupted when the past comes calling in the form of her impulsive sister Del. Just as Martha tries to reconcile herself to being her unstable sister’s caretaker, a fellow student on campus vanishes. Martha’s visions return with a vengeance.

 

Although the missing girl is pivotal to the plot of The Clairvoyants, Brown’s story is too leisurely paced to feel like suspense. Her focus is less on finding the missing girl and more on understanding Martha’s unwillingness to use her “gift.” Indeed, Martha’s reluctance to get involved in the case becomes a symbol for her reluctance to take charge of her own life.

 

Readers who enjoyed Alice Hoffman’s Practical Magic and Sarah Addison Allen’s The Peach Keeper should enjoy The Clairvoyants. Like these authors, Brown uses the suspense genre to explore the rivalries that shape women and their relationships with one another.


 
 

The Fifth Petal

posted by: January 25, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Fifth PetalBrunonia Barry brings us an exciting and enchanting mystery in her new book The Fifth Petal, which takes place in Salem, Massachusetts.

 

On Halloween night in 1989, a group of women gather to bless the grave of their ancestors, who were accused of witchcraft and hanged during the Salem witch trials. That night, three of the women mysteriously die, leaving Rose Whelan and Callie Cahill, the 5-year-old daughter of one of the other women, as the only survivors. Rose is convinced that a banshee murdered the women and is sent to a mental hospital. Callie is questioned and sent away, and the case grows cold.

 

On Halloween night 25 years later, a teenage boy mysteriously dies while harassing Rose, and Rose is once again convinced that the banshee is the killer. While investigating the murder of the boy, old memories and the unsolved case resurface. Tormented by the memory of that night in 1989, Callie returns to Salem to see Rose and uncover some answers for herself.

 

The mysteries of the past are unraveled as Callie begins to remember exactly what happened the night her mother and the other women died. Full of mysteries, myths and strong storytelling, The Fifth Petal is entirely captivating. Check out Brunonia Barry’s other novel, The Lace Reader, also set in Salem.


 
 

Dear Amy

posted by: January 2, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dear AmyIn Helen Callaghan’s electrifying debut novel Dear Amy, a young teacher battles a faceless enemy to save an abducted student’s life. Margot Lewis teaches in an exclusive private high school in Cambridge, England. She has discovered a talent for reaching her students, and they often turn to her for advice. It’s a natural step for Margot to become an advice columnist for the local newspaper under the pseudonym Dear Amy. One day, Margot receives a letter that shakes her down to the depths of her soul. Dear Amy: I’ve been kidnapped by a strange man. I don’t know where I am. Please help me. It's signed by a young girl who went missing 20 years before.  

 

It is a desperate plea that Margot cannot ignore. The letter may be a hoax, but if it’s not, it could be the missing girl’s only chance at survival. When a student from Margot’s class goes missing, Margot knows she cannot stand idly by. Facing the possibility of being accused as a fraud, she takes the letter to the police, where it is authenticated as written by the missing girl. The police renew their investigation, and refer the case to criminologist Martin Forrester of Cambridge University. Together, Martin and Margot descend into the mind of a serial felon. Echoes from Margot’s past resonate into her present. Margot must conquer her own demons in order to defeat this new enemy.

 

Powerful, lyrical and taut with suspense, this literary thriller will seize you from the first page to the last. Helen Callaghan has woven a compelling tale of obsession and evil that takes her characters to the limits of their endurance. Laced with references to the classics, readers of Tana French, Peter Robinson and Gillian Flynn will appreciate the prose as well as the plot.


 
 

Dr. Knox

posted by: October 26, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dr. KnoxA tale of human trafficking and refugees masquerades convincingly as an L.A. noir thriller in Dr. Knox, the latest novel from Shamus Award-winning author Peter Spiegelman. In three previous books featuring banker-turned-detective John March, Spiegelman pretty much created the genre of “Wall Street noir.” Now, he takes that same grim sensibility and applies it to Dr. Adam Knox, a man whose apparent death wish is constantly at war with his desire to save the world. These conflicting goals lead to lots of trouble, not only for Knox, but for his employees and the few friends he has.

 

In Dr. Knox, a woman fleeing Russian mobsters leaves her little boy at Knox’s shabby clinic in L.A.’s Skid Row. Rather than turn the child over to Social Services, Knox becomes convinced he can save both child and mother. He sets out to do so with the help of his buddy Ben Sutter, a former Special Forces operative. The vibe between these two was very reminiscent of the relationship between Robert Parker's detective, Spenser, and his sidekick, Hawk.

 

Like that master of L.A. noir, Raymond Chandler, Spiegelman keeps much of the real story bobbing just below the surface throughout this tale. As Knox searches for the boy’s missing mother and runs afoul of mobsters and corrupt American business tycoons, readers get unsettling glimpses into Knox’s own messy backstory. It becomes clear that while the doctor’s heart is in the right place, his penchant for self-destruction could hurt the very people he seeks to help.

 

Fans of classic noir fiction and old-fashioned “hard-boiled” detective stories should enjoy Dr. Knox.

 


 
 

Siracusa

posted by: September 22, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for SiracusaDelia Ephron is best-known for her humorous writing and for lighthearted screenplays like You’ve Got Mail and Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. But her latest novel, Siracusa, displays a decidedly more cynical view of relationships.

 

Siracusa begins with Lizzie, who thinks a vacation in Italy is just what she and her husband David need to revive their flagging writing careers and their dwindling passion for one another. They’re joined on the trip by another couple — Finn, Lizzie’s fun-loving old flame from college, and his uptight wife Taylor. Dragged along for the fun is Snow, Finn and Taylor’s sullen preteen daughter. If bringing an old boyfriend and his family along for a vacation sounds like a bad idea to you, you’d be right. In fact, few vacation disasters can rival the nightmarish results when this group makes its way to the ancient island of Siracusa.

 

Each main character takes a turn recounting the trip’s gradual descent into tragedy.  Without exception, all of them are breathtakingly self-involved or delusional (or both). Thus none of them can see what the reader sees — the huge disaster heading straight for them.

 

Like The Girl on the Train and Gone Girl, Siracusa presents readers with difficult to like protagonists who never tell the whole truth. The crumbling city of Siracusa provides an excellent symbolic backdrop for Ephron’s well-written blend of dark domestic drama and deadly suspense.


 
 

Don’t You Cry

posted by: September 6, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Don't You CryWhat would you do if your roommate disappeared into the night? Or if a mysterious stranger showed up in your small town? Would you be curious? Would you call the police? Would you do nothing? Such is the subject matter of Mary Kubica’s latest psychological thriller, Don’t You Cry. Addictive from the very first paragraph, you won’t be able to put this book down. Everyone has secrets, and these two have more than their fair share!

 

Twentysomething Quinn awakens one Sunday morning to find her roommate, Esther, missing from their apartment. In disbelief, Quinn waits around for her to return home. But as the hours go by, she slowly realizes something is amiss. Why did Esther take several large ATM withdrawals days before her disappearance? Why did she place an order to change the apartment locks? Why did she never speak of her former roommate or family? Who is Esther really? Did Quinn even know her? Will she find her?

 

Meanwhile, another story is being told by Alex, an 18-year-old living in a northern Michigan town. Skipping college to take care of his neglectful, alcoholic father, Alex spends his days bussing tables at a local restaurant. One day, an unknown woman appears. Calling her Pearl, he obsessively follows her every move. Why is she in a summer town in the middle of fall? Where is she from? How is this connected to Esther’s disappearance?

 

Kubica gives just enough clues to keep you guessing and frantically turning the page. Believe me, you will become obsessed with Esther’s disappearance and Pearl’s story. Filled with surprising twists, Don’t You Cry begs to be devoured quickly. But don’t you cry when you read the last word — Kubica has written two other thrillers, The Good Girl and Pretty Baby, just waiting to be read.


 
 

Missing, Presumed

posted by: July 27, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Missing, PresumedWhen Detective Sergeant Manon Bradshaw arrives on the scene of the crime, the door is hanging open, there is an abandoned coat in the foyer and broken glass and blood splatter in the kitchen. These are the only clues to track in Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner. The victim is Ph.D. candidate Edith Hind, daughter of eminent surgeon Sir Ian Hind. Sir Ian is highly connected, but despite pressure from the Home Secretary, there are very few clues to follow, and time is running out for Edith and the Cambridgeshire Police.

 

Manon’s frustration grows as the first 72 hours — considered the most vital in a missing person’s case — seep away. As the press circles the scene like vultures, devouring the most salacious details of Edith’s love life, Manon’s team scrambles to gather more clues. With the clock ticking and pressure on every side, Manon must delve the deepest secrets of a very private prominent family to unearth what really happened to Edith.

 

Steiner uses multiple perspectives from different characters to create a wholly believable story with psychological depth. She develops the characters through their distinct eccentricities; Manon listens to a police scanner to ease herself to sleep, her colleague Davy peppers police jargon throughout his conversations and the missing Edith can recycle anything into an art project. One revelation after another brings you to a conclusion you do not see coming. This police procedural has all the elements of a riveting psychological thriller. Missing, Presumed is a beautifully written novel by an up-and-coming writer.

 


 
 

The Devil You Know

posted by: June 29, 2016 - 7:00am

The Devil You KnowCan a person con their way out of a "lawyer-tight" contract that promises his or her soul to the Devil upon death? K. J. Parker, a two-time winner of the World Fantasy Award, will elegantly feed you this delicious information in his science fiction and fantasy novella The Devil You Know.

 

“...Why exactly do you want to sell your soul to us?” This is a question that a demon case officer, who is in the soul buying business, asks his new client, Saloninus, the world’s greatest philosopher, liar, cheat and trickster. Time flew by rather quickly for Saloninus, a 77-year-old man who believes he wasted his talent on scheming others. Unhappy with the fact that he has no self-respecting achievements, he decides to sign a contract to sell his soul to the Devil in order to acquire 20 more years of life on Earth and a youthful transformation to age 25 for the opportunity to make a mark on history. Once Saloninus signs the contract, the demon case officer becomes his servant, who uses his own supernatural abilities to grant Saloninus outlandish requests. When the demon questions Saloninus about what he plans to do with his additional years on Earth, the philosopher behaves suspiciously. This behavior gives the demon a reason to believe that the old trickster is up to his old tricks again and that his target is… the Devil. Saloninus is supposed to be the cleverest man on Earth. Will Saloninus successfully swindle the Devil? The demon case officer is supposed to be the best in the business. Will he halt Saloninus’ plan? To swindle or not to swindle, that is the question.

 

Readers who relish stories that involve the supernatural, mortality and good and evil, will find K. J. Parker’s novella The Devil You Know delightful and possibly frightful. Add this entertaining treat to your summer reading list — if you dare.


 
 

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