“No More Half-Measures, Walter.”

posted by: April 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Baking BadIn the vacuum following the series finale of Breaking Bad, it stands to reason that the show’s addicts will scramble for another fix wherever they can find it. For some, Better Call Saul is enough. For this particular addict, that scramble led unexpectedly to the pages of Baking Bad: A Parody in a Cookbook by Walter Wheat.


Baking Bad cakeA sweet journey through some of the show’s most classic episodes, the recipes in Baking Bad are generously garnished with references to those more compelling moments in the series that first hooked its audience. Including recipes for Meth Crunchies, Mr. White’s Tighty Whitey Bites and Fring Pops, the desserts produced are unmistakably unique, calling forth specific people and scenes in the show.


Replete with clever puns, tongue-in-cheek references throughout each recipe and some exquisite illustrations of the completed desserts, Baking Bad is definitely deserving of a prominent place on any Breaking Bad enthusiast’s coffee table. But is it a must have in the kitchen as well? As a distinctly amateur cook and an even more hesitant baker, I wondered if the exquisite works of art bedecking the pages were actually achievable without sacrificing my sanity. Steering clear of any recipes requiring an abundance of fondant or special tools like sugar thermometers, I put some of the simpler recipes to the test. My best result? (See picture to the right.)


Ricin Krispies Squares: The results were mighty tasty and surprisingly true in appearance to the results predicted in the book.


Those hoping to find inspiration for a Breaking Bad-themed party will definitely find what they’re looking for. While most of the recipes are complicated enough to merit look-don’t-eat centerpiece status, Baking Bad does also include a few higher-yield recipes like the above-pictured that should satisfy guests with an appetite.


Pride and Prejudice and Murder

posted by: October 24, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Death Comes to PemberlyWhat happens after happily ever after? Mystery author P. D. James reimagines the futures of the characters from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice in Death Comes to Pemberley. Six years after Elizabeth and Darcy’s marriage, a shocking event rocks the residents of Pemberley. On the night before their annual ball, Elizabeth’s sister Lydia appears at Pemberley hysterically screaming that Mr. Wickham has been murdered. Upon investigation, it is actually Captain Denny who is dead, but in an even more shocking turn of events, the most logical suspect is none other than Wickham! Austen fans are well-acquainted with Wickham’s past misdeeds, but could he really be capable of murder?

Death Comes to Pemberley is a well-crafted mystery written in a tone similar to Austen’s own, making this a perfect companion to the classic novel. The audiobook read by Rosalyn Landor will whisk you away to the 19th century. James seeds the story with plausible suspects and a few red herrings, but in the end all questions are answered and readers are given a glimpse into the Darcys’ future.

The novel has been adapted into a miniseries that will soon air on PBS. The miniseries will begin on October 26 and will be released on DVD later that week.


Small Town Secrets

posted by: October 2, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for BroadchurchErin Kelly’s Broadchurch invites readers to travel to the quiet British seaside town of the same name where we meet Detective Ellie Miller, fresh off a rejuvenating vacation and excited to return to work where a promotion awaits. She’s not back long before learning that her coveted position went to outsider Alec Hardy, an interloper with a checkered professional past. Simultaneously, readers are introduced to Beth Latimer, a typical mom and friend of Ellie’s, who is slowly reaching the gut-wrenching conclusion that her son is missing.


When a boy’s body is discovered on the beach, word spreads quickly through the small town. Ellie and Hardy arrive and immediately realize the death was no accident. Anguished mom Beth races to the scene only to learn that the dead boy is indeed her 11-year-old son Danny. As Ellie and Hardy work together to solve this devastating crime, they must also deal with two distraught families and a shattered community. The investigation intensifies, and it becomes clear that the killer is someone close to home. No one is immune from being cast a suspect, including Beth Latimer and her husband. This is a gripping, dramatic story set in a seemingly sleepy town that is bubbling with secrets and lies.


Kelly’s novel is an adaptation of the first season of the hit British drama Broadchurch, available on DVD. In October, FOX will begin airing Gracepoint, a 10-part reworking of the British drama set in California but interestingly featuring the same lead actor, David Tennant.


It’s Always the Husband

posted by: September 18, 2014 - 8:00am

Gone GirlWhen Amy Elliott Dunne goes missing on the day of her fifth wedding anniversary, suspicion immediately falls on her husband Nick. Everyone knows that in these cases it’s always the husband, right? With unpredictable characters and a plot worthy of Hitchcock, Gillian Flynn’s runaway bestselling novel Gone Girl has captivated audiences since it was published in 2012, and it’s gaining a whole new audience as a film based on the novel comes to theaters on October 3. The movie, starring Ben Affleck, Rosamund Pike, Neil Patrick Harris, Casey Wilson and Tyler Perry, is already one of the most buzzed about of the year, and its haunting trailer makes it clear why.


Reports about changes in the plot and the ending of the movie have worried fans. While Flynn told Entertainment Weekly, “There was something thrilling about taking this piece of work that I’d spent about two years painstakingly putting together with all its eight million LEGO pieces and take a hammer to it and bash it apart and reassemble it into a movie” earlier this year, fans of the book shouldn’t be worried. She later assured readers that “the mood, tone and spirit of the book are very much intact. I've been very involved in the film and loved it.” We’ll all just have to wait and see.


By this point, many readers have already raced through Gone Girl. Here are a few dark and twisty thrillers for readers who enjoyed it. Mary Kubica’s debut thriller The Good Girl, about the abduction of the 24-year-old daughter of a prominent Chicago family, is a page-turner with plenty of plot twists and turns. A.S.A. Harrison’s The Silent Wife is a gripping psychological thriller about the dissolution of a couple’s relationship. Sabine Durrant’s Under Your Skin is a dark thrill-ride featuring a potentially unreliable narrator, a troubled marriage and a murder case playing out in the media. For more suggestions, check out this list of 10 Gone Girl readalikes to tide you over until the movie’s release.


Seven Days with the Foxman Family

posted by: September 16, 2014 - 8:00am

This Is Where I Leave YouWhen Mort Foxman died, he had one request: He wanted his family to sit shiva. So the Foxman family gathers to mourn Mort, bringing all four siblings to their childhood home for seven days. During that time, old grudges reemerge, new dramas arise and secrets come to light in Jonathan Tropper’s smart and darkly comic novel This Is Where I Leave You.


In addition to the loss of his father, Judd’s life is falling apart after he walked into his bedroom to find his wife having sex with his boss. His older brother Paul, who still blames Judd for the accident that ended his promising baseball career, is struggling with fertility problems with his wife Alice who is desperate to have a baby. Their sister Wendy has a distant, strained relationship with her workaholic husband Barry and still has feelings for her childhood sweetheart Horry. Youngest brother Phillip, who is known as the family screw-up, surprises everyone when he shows and introduces them to his much older life coach/fiancée. The novel is told from Judd’s perspective, and his laugh-out-loud funny, honest observations are a perfect counterpoint to the serious and sometimes heartbreaking issues that the characters in this dysfunctional family face.


This Is Where I Leave You will be in theaters on September 19. The movie’s stellar ensemble cast includes Jason Bateman, Tina Fey, Corey Stoll, Adam Driver, Jane Fonda, Connie Britton, Dax Shepard, Kathryn Hahn and Rose Byrne. The screenplay was adapted by Tropper, so fans can rest assured that the movie will reflect the spirit (and some of the great one-liners!) of the novel.


Hazed and Confused

posted by: August 22, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Brutal YouthAnthony Breznican, senior staff writer for Entertainment Weekly, is trying his hand at fiction writing with his debut novel Brutal Youth. This omniscient view of a parochial high school demonstrates how vicious adolescence can be, and what lengths people will go to hide their secrets.


In a parochial school where sins are so pervasive that they fill the halls, the students just try to make it through the day while administrators work to save the school for another year. On Davidek and Stein’s introductory visit to St. Michael's, the halls are so full of tension that a student snaps and begins throwing objects at other students while fortified on the roof. It’s Davidek and Stein’s quick thinking that allows them to save a fallen student and, due to their efforts, they’re bonded in friendship.


Despite their abysmal first impression of the school, both students find themselves enrolled for their freshman year. The novel follows their first year of high school from freshman hazing to dysfunctional families and even relationship woes. An omniscient narrator is able to show how anxieties trickle down in the school from administrative setbacks to pressure on teachers who let off steam by cracking down on students who then turn on the freshmen.


This bold debut takes an interesting look at a subject that’s all too relevant in today’s society where bullying runs rampant. The setting of a parochial school is a thought provoking choice as well because expectations are different for public school versus religious establishments. However, the reader will quickly discover there’s not a whole lot of difference other than the dress code and course offerings.


Outlander Summer

posted by: August 5, 2014 - 8:00am

Written in My Own Heart's BloodAsk any fan of author Diana Gabaldon how they feel this summer, and the answer will almost certainly echo the Clan Fraser motto, “Je suis prest,” which means “I am ready.” Starz is bringing Gabaldon’s internationally bestselling Outlander novels to life with a new television series premiering August 9, and this sneak peak proves that it was worth the wait.


Outlander, the first book in the series, opens in 1946 as Claire is traveling with her husband Frank in the Scottish highlands. When she walks through a stone circle, she inexplicably finds herself transported to 1743. In a world completely unlike her own, Claire finds herself dealing with intrigue and political maneuvering that she barely understands, and the stakes are high. To avoid being turned over to English soldiers as a presumed spy, she marries Scottish outlaw Jamie Fraser and is soon torn between her love for Frank and her blossoming love for Jamie.


Although Jamie is widely regarded as one of the most swoon-worthy heroes in historical romance, this genre-bending series isn’t just for romance readers. With time travel, detailed history, adventure and intrigue, these rich novels will appeal to a wide variety of readers. Outlander is a complex series that weaves back and forth through time, so reading the books in order is a must. If you’re new to the series, start reading now! These books are quite long, but they are impossible to put down. The audiobooks, narrated by Davina Porter, are also an excellent way to enjoy this not-to-be-missed series.


Written in My Own Heart’s Blood, the long-awaited eighth book in the series, was just published, and Gabaldon recently discussed the new book, the future of the series and her excitement about the upcoming TV show in this Goodreads interview.


A Modern Twist on a Classic Story

posted by: June 24, 2014 - 7:00am

The Secret Diary of Lizzy BennetTwo years ago, Bernie Su and Hank Green, the brother of young adult author John Green, started a YouTube Web series, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries, which became an overnight success. A modern day adaptation of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice, The Lizzie Bennet Diaries ran for close to a year and 100 episodes. Lizzie’s video blogs, or vlogs, began as a project for her master’s degree in mass communications, but takes on a life of its own as Lizzie’s sisters and friends get involved. Filled with pop culture references, and social media tie-ins on Twitter and Tumblr, the series has now moved into the book world with The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet.


Lizzie’s diary fills in holes from her vlogs, giving fans insight into her complicated relationship with William Darcy, her relationships with her sisters, Lydia and Jane and her longtime friendship with Charlotte Lu. Readers follow Lizzie as she meets Darcy at the fateful Gibson wedding, to her ill-fated relationship with George Wickham, and subsequent discovery about his true character and to her internships at Collins & Collins and Pemberley Digital. Though Lizzie is a more modern character—tweeting, vlogging and getting her master’s degree—the basis of the story is one that many know well from Pride and Prejudice.


The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet is sure to delight Austen fans looking for a modern take on a classic story. The Secret Diary of Lizzie Bennet, much like the vlogs, is a funny, romantic story filled with wonderful friends and family who help Lizzie overcome her prejudices and grow as a character.


The Litchfield Ladies’ Book Club

posted by: June 24, 2014 - 7:00am

Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Woman's PrisonOrange Is the New Black Season OneOrange Is the New Black is back! The second season of the popular series starring Taylor Schilling, Jason Biggs and Laura Prepon was released a few weeks ago exclusively on Netflix. The first season’s dramatic ending left fans on the edge of their seats, and the second season brings us right back to the drama at the fictional Litchfield Correctional Facility.


The show is based on Piper Kerman’s bestselling 2010 memoir Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Woman’s Prison. When Kerman was sentenced to 15 months in a minimum security federal prison for a crime that she committed 10 years earlier, she entered a world unlike anything she had ever known. Kerman’s memoir takes readers through her entire sentence as she learns to navigate this world with its unique set of rules and social norms. The book is about more than just Kerman’s experiences, though. The reader gets an up-close view of the American correctional system, and we are introduced to her fellow inmates, whose lives and circumstances are very different from her own. Kerman’s memoir is heartbreaking, uproariously funny and sometimes shocking.


Reading is a popular way for the Litchfield inmates to pass the time. A lot of scenes take place in the prison library, and the characters are frequently spotted reading or holding books. The books in the background have taken on a life of their own, becoming a popular topic for fan discussions and blogs. Entertainment Weekly’s Stephan Lee breaks down what the characters are reading in the new season episode by episode. (Contains spoilers.) Popular novels like John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars and Ian McEwan’s Atonement are featured alongside classics like Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. If you want to read along with the ladies of Litchfield, this list will help you get started.


Looking for More House of Cards?

posted by: May 5, 2014 - 8:00am

House of CardsDid you already binge-watch the second season of House of Cards on Netflix? Are you on pins and needles waiting to see where Frank and Claire’s machinations will lead them next? These novels filled with intrigue and scheming are just the thing to help ease your post-season two blues.


Before it was a hit American series, House of Cards was a popular British miniseries inspired by a trilogy of novels written by Michael Dobbs, a former advisor of Margaret Thatcher. The author recently revised House of Cards, the first novel in the trilogy, and it has been re-released. This thriller revolves around Chief Whip Francis Urquhart and his Machiavellian political maneuvering and Mattie Storin, a driven young reporter who pursues a story about corruption that she can’t resist. Like the television adaptation, the novel is ruled by political intrigue. The remaining novels in the trilogy will also be available later this year, so stay tuned for more plotting, greed and corruption.


For more political scheming, try Hilary Mantel’s Man Booker Prize-winning novel Wolf Hall, which brings 16th-century English politics to life. This fictional account of the life of Thomas Cromwell shows his rise to his position of advisor to the king and his skill as a consummate political schemer. The novel follows Cromwell’s behind-the-scenes maneuvering during the tumultuous reign of Henry VIII. Mantel’s well-researched, skillfully written novel is the first in a trilogy that you won’t want to miss.


If you’re looking for dark stories about ruthless, manipulative characters, Patricia Highsmith’s 1955 novel The Talented Mr. Ripley is the gold standard. Tom Ripley is entranced by the wealthy world of his new acquaintance Dickie Greenleaf. When Dickie’s father asks Tom to go to Italy and convince his wayward son to come home to New York, Tom agrees. He slowly becomes more and more obsessed with Dickie’s world and eventually assumes Dickie’s identity. Highsmith tells the story from Tom’s distorted yet charismatic perspective, leaving the reader both fascinated and horrified.



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