Injection

posted by: June 21, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for InjectionFive eccentric geniuses, the Cultural Cross-Contamination Unit, are gathered and given free rein to improve the world as they see fit. Years after the five initiate their mysterious means to “make the 21st century more interesting,” they begin to see the bizarre and occasionally horrifying repercussions of their inexplicable experiment. Injection by Warren Ellis is a truly unique experience; it dips its toes in science fiction, horror, action and even a little bit of traditional folklore, and meanders nonlinearly through different characters’ stories, leaving it up to the reader to decrypt the tale of “the Injection.”

 

Long after the Cultural Cross-Contamination Unit have parted ways, they each begin coming into contact with the twisted fruit of their earlier labor. What began as a seemingly innocent computer program eventually leads to a number of horrifying scenes, including a computer speaking through a mutilated human host and an ancient legend about monstrous pixies being made real by a malicious artificial intelligence. These surreal scenes and the more grounded everyday lives of the characters, including a surprising number of sandwiches illustrated and mentioned throughout the course of the book, are rendered masterfully by artist Declan Shalvey and colorist Jordie Bellaire, whose styles mesh wonderfully to highlight the rapidly shifting tone of the book.

 

Fans of Warren Ellis will recognize his signature combination of science and magic at work here. The two are closely linked in this story, and Ellis takes his time exploring the similarities as he slowly unravels the truth behind the mysterious “injection.” Something like a particularly dreamlike episode of the X-Files, Injection is a wild ride that explores the ways that people interact with technology and the shocking ways that technology could start to react. If you enjoy Injection, try Moon Knight: From the Dead by the same creative team.

 


 
 

Theorizing with Science Fiction

posted by: June 9, 2016 - 7:00am

Forest of MemoryThe Private EyeSpeculating about the possibilities and ethics of new technologies has long been the domain of science fiction. As we stand on the cusp of virtual realities and cloud computing, two new books revisit these contemplations with fresh voices and compelling tales.

 

Forest of Memory by Mary Robinette Kowal is Katya Gould’s vernacular recounting of a mysterious abduction that left her cut off from other people and, more direly, from Internet access for one week. An antiques dealer with a recently acquired typewriter, she was on her way to a client meeting when a chance encounter in a forest disrupts her plans, and the plans of her mysterious abductor. Through Katya’s recounting, Kowal contemplates the pros and cons that come with our gradual externalization of memory through technology. Her future society envisions a culture that values wabi-sabi (a Japanese aesthetic that values the imperfections that come with objects being handmade and well-used) above all else and prizes the authenticity of experiences when its members are unwilling (or unable) to seek them out for themselves. With the thrilling elements of Gillian Flynn and an engaging tone reminiscent of Ray Bradbury, this novella doesn’t lack in substance despite being a mere 85 pages long.

 

Sometime in the early 21st century, “the Cloud” burst and everyone’s online secrets rained down upon them, ruining relationships and destroying lives. So the Internet was abolished. The police force merged with the press corps, new inventions like dreamcoats and flatex were created so that anyone can look like anything (for the right price) and people’s identities are carefully guarded secrets. It is in this version of the year 2075 that Brian K. Vaughan (of Saga fame) and Marcos Martin stage The Private Eye, a classic noir mystery told first as a webcomic and now in print. A vigilante PI begins a double-blind background check when his client is killed and he is framed as the prime suspect. To prove his innocence, he begins to dig deeper with the assistance of his sassy sidekicks and uncovers a megalomaniac’s sinister plans. Reminiscent of Blade Runner, this graphic novel doesn’t just pose the obvious questions about identity but also critiques how much the Internet has actually helped the modern age.

Liz

Liz

 
 

Miracleman: The Golden Age

posted by: May 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for MiraclemanAfter 30 years of legal troubles kept it from seeing print, Miracleman: The Golden Age by Neil Gaiman and Mark Buckingham is a lost classic that is well worth the wait. For those unfamiliar, Miracleman was the first “serious” superhero, who began the “grim ‘n gritty” style of comics in the 1980’s.This was a time when writers started asking what would happen if superheroes existed in the real world. The answer was usually violent. But for a comic that came from the same era as cynical classics like Watchmen and The Dark Knight Returns, Neil Gaiman’s Miracleman is surprisingly optimistic.

 

The story of Miracleman is basically about a Superman knockoff who discovers that he’s actually the product of government experiments and brainwashing. He decides to break the cycle of superhero antics by abolishing all governments and setting up a global utopia over which he rules as a god. It’s a pretty shocking concept, but when Neil Gaiman took over writing the book he did something even more audacious: he took the idea of a world without crime and ran with it. Instead of focusing on Miracleman, the book suddenly became a series of vignettes exploring how average people react to finding themselves in a utopia.

 

This was Gaiman’s first comics work and so it’s surprising that it’s some of his best. The stories in this volume are both wildly imaginative and emotionally grounded. We’re introduced to various people — a father making a pilgrimage to Miracleman to ask him to save his daughter’s life, a spy learning to live in a world without espionage and even a resurrected Andy Warhol questioning existence and getting back into silk screening — each of them trying to understand what it means to be human in a world that is suddenly (more or less) perfect. Fans of Gaiman’s Sandman series will find plenty to enjoy, and even non comic book fans will discover a book that proves comics don’t have to be violent to explore adult ideas.


 
 

Jessica Jones

posted by: February 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Jessica JonesLife would be rock star awesome if we had super powers, right? Well, not really. Take a look at Jessica Jones, a depressed private detective self-employed at Alias Investigations. Before that, though, she was a mediocre, costumed superhero with unimpressive super power abilities, at least when compared to big names like Storm and Invisible Woman. Follow me as I give you a sneak peek inside Jessica Jones: Alias, volume 1, a graphic novel penned by Brian Michael Bendis and illustrated by Michael Gaydos.
 

In Volume 1, Jessica works as a private detective at Alias Investigations to solve superhuman- related cases for her overly concerned clients. She takes on a job that turns out to be iffy. For instance, while she is out conducting surveillance for a case, she captures a man on video changing into his superhero costume. His name is Captain America, and his identity is a secret. The same case lands her in an interrogation room with the cops for suspicion of murder. Jessica realizes she was set up to film the secret identity of Captain America and to be the fall guy for a murder. Her plan is to find the mastermind behind this dirty scheme. Although Jessica Jones’ superhero days are possibly over, her future as private eye is looking mighty bright.

 
I totally admire the illustrations by Michael Gaydos. I love the panel layouts and the way he draws the characters’ facial expressions. The coloring by Matt Hollingsworth has a film noir-ish vibe, which is a plus because I love classic Hollywood films. The dialogue is engaging. The protagonist is mysterious and intriguing. I look forward to reading more about Jessica Jones. If you relish film noir, crime, mystery, private detectives and superheroes, read Jessica Jones: Alias, volume 1. If you find yourself liking this graphic novel, then check out Marvel's Jessica Jones television series, which is available now on Netflix. When you're finished reading Jessica Jones: Alias, volume 1, and you find yourself wanting more, be sure to pick up a copy of volumes 2, 3 and 4 at your nearest BCPL branch.

 


 
 

Lady Killer

posted by: December 23, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Lady KillerJames Bond, who? Meet Schuller. Josephine Schuller. Most people call her Josie and, although she may fit the description of a Bond girl, she's the type of woman who could take Bond down and end his days of drinking shaken, dry vodka martinis. Why and how, you ask? Well, don’t let this homemaker, wife and mother of two, fool you. She is a vicious assassin who knows how to work a knife inside and outside the kitchen. Josie Schuller is the Lady Killer in Joëlle Jones and Jamie S. Rich’s graphic novel set in the early 1960s.

 

Josie Schuller reminds me of Angelina Jolie’s character, Jane Smith, in the 2005 film Mr. and Mrs. Smith and January Jones’ Betty Draper in AMC’s hit television series, Mad Men. In Lady Killer, Josie tricks her twin daughters, husband and friends into believing that she is just a stay-at-home wife and mother. What they don’t know is that she is also an agent working for Mr. Stenholm, who gives her assignments to terminate lives. Josie learns that she is on Mr. Stenholm’s target list when he sends her co-worker, David Peck, to execute her. Josie devises her own plan to eliminate them both.

 

This graphic novel is most definitely a treat. The eye-catching, vintage-inspired illustrations by Joëlle Jones and the delicious colors by Laura Allred lured me in. Lady Killer has everything you want in a graphic novel. Stunning artwork? Check. An interesting protagonist? Check. Brilliant colors? Check. A page-turning story? Check.

 

So, what are you waiting for? Drop what you’re doing and get your hands on Lady Killer by Joëlle Jones and Jamie S. Rich. You won’t regret it.


 
 

All-New Captain America

posted by: December 9, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for All-New Captain AmericaAttention all Captain America fans, Falcon fans, Marvel fans and fans of superheroes! Just in case you didn’t get the memo, I am pleased to inform you or remind you that there is a new captain in town that is ready and able to lay a smack down on members of Team Hydra with his handy-dandy red, white and blue shield. With that said, I present to you Sam Wilson, also known as Falcon, who was chosen by his trusted friend and colleague Steve Rogers to become the new Captain America. This story can be found in the Marvel Now series, All-New Captain America, Volume 1: Hydra Ascendant with Rick Remender as the writer and Stuart Immonen as the penciler.

 

So, how exactly does Sam fare as the new red, white and blue hero? Pretty good. Sam is on a mission to save the world. Steve Rogers, who no longer looks youthful after being restored to his natural old age, sends Sam off to stop Hydra, an international subversive organization, from carrying out a terrorist attack. Hydra’s current goal is to make the world secure for themselves by preventing overpopulation by any means necessary. They hope to accomplish this task by spreading across the U.S. a child’s blood that contains a pervasive toxin capable of making people infertile. This is a personal problem for Sam because not only does he wants to make the world a safe place, but he also wants to start his own family. While Sam battles his foes, he also battles what people think of him and what his parents would think of him if they were alive. In the All-New Captain America, Volume 1: Hydra Ascendant, Sam contests against members of the New Hydra: Sin, the daughter of Red Skull; Zemo; Batroc; Crossbones and Baron Blood. However, Sam does not fight solo. Fighting by his side are: his partner Redwing; sidekick Nomad, who happens to be Steve Rogers’ adopted son, and Misty Knight, who claims to work for S.H.I.E.L.D.

 

Does Sam complete his mission? Does Hydra succeed? Does Sam get sterilized by the toxin to prevent him from having his own family? Read the All-New Captain America, Volume 1: Hydra Ascendant to find out what happens. There is a bit of a cliffhanger at the end. Therefore, if you want to know what happens next, you’ll have to stay tuned for more of the All-New Captain America. Visit Marvel.com to check out the latest news on your favorite characters, comics and graphic novels.
 


 
 

Ann Tenna

posted by: December 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Ann TennaIn Ann Tenna, Marisa Marchetto (author of the autobiography, Cancer Vixen) offers a meditation on how people shape their own realities — and are shaped by them — and disguises it as a graphic novel about a gossip columnist who finally receives a heaping dish of her own karmic garbage.

 

Ann is a gossip columnist to the nth power. She is a horrible person to everyone she knows — other than her best friend, Miu, her boyfriend, Zim, and her father, girl-product peddler extraordinaire A. M. Tenna. Because she has been a terrible individual in every other lifetime she has been granted, Super-Ann (Ann at her very best self) has super-kicked regular Ann back to Earth for her final “incarceration” — her very last chance to be a kind human and a positive force in the world. Good luck with that, Ann.

 

She starts as a breech birth, and events in her personal life only go downhill. Fast-forward three decades, and Ann is fixing to get her humanitarian award — until she is publically humiliated. And then she dies. Almost. When her consciousness wakes in a whole new plane, Super-Ann (in her magical, sparkly, impossible platform shoes) takes the elbow-length gloves off and forces regular, snotty Ann to become the broadcaster the Universe intended her to be. Unless regular Ann can stop her.

 


 
 

Akame ga KILL!

posted by: November 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Akame ga KILL!The world of Akame ga KILL! is like a frenetic mash-up of The Hunger Games and Attack on Titan. The premiere volume of the 2010 manga series made its U.S. debut in March, pitting vivacious and foolhardy swordsman Tatsumi against the Capital, an affluent city rife with corruption and depravity.

 

Surrounded on all sides by roving gangs of assassins, rebel armies and nomadic tribes of ferals, the Capital is many impoverished settlers’ only hope — or option — for survival. Tatsumi embarks for the Capital from his village with his friends Sayo and Ieyasu, dreaming of becoming a renowned mercenary. The three are separated during an ambush; Tatsumi assumes his friends will journey to the Capital to regroup, so he does the same, utilizing his superior skills in battle to aid fellow travelers along the way.

 

When he arrives, Tatsumi is awestruck by the sights and smells of the city. Amidst the aristocracy, he finds a tavern and encounters Leone, a cat-like vixen who cons him out of all his earnings from the journey’s battles. Now desperate, Tatsumi sheepishly accepts an offer of lodging from a wealthy family in exchange for his service as a guard at their estate.

 

As quickly as Tatsumi settles into his new routine as a sentry, a team of brutal assassins assaults the estate and murders the entire family in cold blood. Tatsumi protects the family’s youngest daughter from a skilled female ninja, but she cajoles the girl into revealing her family’s terrible secret. The assassins are impressed by Tatsumi’s unwavering demeanor and “kidnap” him after the ordeal to offer him a choice: join their ranks and become a killer by trade or die.

 

Akame ga KILL! Vol. 1 is filled with characters who hide their lunacies behind perfect façades absolutely begging to be sliced in twain, and there is no shortage of bloodshed in the first volume. Manga and anime fans who revel in seeing justice gracefully dispensed with a katana will surely dig this.

Tom

Tom

 
 

Copperhead

posted by: November 12, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for CopperheadThere’s a new sheriff in town. The town just happens to be a rundown mining hub on a fringe planet populated by all manner of ill-tempered aliens, and the sheriff just happens to be Clara Bronson, a single mother looking for a fresh start. Copperhead: Vol. 1 is a genre-bending classic in the making, and the recent release of its first collected volume makes this the perfect time to jump onboard.

 

As if Sherriff Bronson didn’t have enough on her plate helping her son adjust to their new home and earning the respect of her grumpy deputy, Budroxifinicus, things get particularly tough for her when she gets called to investigate the brutal massacre of a local family on her very first day on the job. The investigation that follows leads Sherriff Bronson from neighborly squabbles to the seedy criminal underbelly of the local mining industry. Look no further for a tense mystery that’ll keep you guessing to the very end.

 

Writer Jay Faerber and artist Scott Godlewski have crafted a truly unique world here. The dusty mining town at the heart of the story is populated by a colorful cast of humans and aliens alike. Crooked industry tycoons, artificial humanoid soldiers leftover from a war long concluded and the wild creatures lurking in the wastes just outside of town are just a few of the fascinating inhabitants that come into play. Colorist Ron Riley ties the package together with a unique mix of vibrant colors and gritty textures that grant a distinct Old West style to the science fiction world. The final result of this fantastic collaboration is a world that fits in somewhere between Fargo and Blade Runner. The quirky cast, unforgettable setting and intricate plot make for a truly exceptional take on the classic murder mystery that’s sure to entertain.

 


 
 

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage coverAutomatons! Higher mathematics! World domination! The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace and Babbage by Sydney Padua contains everything inquiring minds could ask for. A history of the nascent development of computing, it contains a detailed and thoroughly researched account of the collaboration between Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage in their creation of the Analytical Machine (now known as a computer). Not limited to just explanations of the mechanical and theoretic processes, Padua also delves into contextualizing the machine’s creation with profiles of the people, culture and time period that had an influence on its formation. Any dryness you might expect of such subject matter is diverted by speculation of what Sherlockian adventures could have happened if the groundbreaking machine actually managed to be produced in the Victorian era of its imagining.

 

Padua’s zeal for her subject is infectious and her research has yielded amusing vignettes of the characters who were involved in the creation of computation, including cameos by George Eliot, Lewis Carroll and Queen Victoria. Despite her frequent demurrals to expertise, she concisely breaks down the complex engineering of her subject (with diagrams!) so that it is understandable for those of us who aren’t engineers, mathematicians or wizards. Be warned: It is text heavy for a graphic novel, primarily because the number and density of footnotes rivals those of the late Terry Pratchett. Like The Great Pratchett, however, the footnotes contain amusing digressions whose levity make them worth the effort. 

Liz

Liz

 
 

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