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Going, Going, Gone

Going, Going, Gone

posted by:
November 5, 2013 - 7:00am

The Rules for DisappearingDancer, Daughter, Traitor, SpyLife on the run might appear glamorous. Travelling to new places, assuming new names and identities, and trying out new living arrangements all seem like obvious perks. But as the young heroines of two new teen novels learn, the truth is far from that.

 

In The Rules for Disappearing, by Ashley Elston, “Meg” (her latest identity) and her family have been in the Witness Protection Program for eight months, and have already lived in six different places. She is tired of the subpar housing and lifestyle, but mostly she is worried about the toll the program is taking on her family: her mom is drowning her anxieties and depression in alcohol, her little sister is a shell of her former self, and her father seems oblivious to it all. Mainly, Meg just wants to know what her father did to land them in the program in the first place. Elston creates grounded characters, realistic depictions of small-town high school life and a suspenseful mystery that draws the reader in.

 

In Elizabeth Kiem’s debut novel, Dancer, Daughter, Traitor, Spy, Marina is a young dancer living in the lap of luxury in the Soviet Union, thanks to her famous ballerina mother’s connections. But when her mother disappears, Marina and her father must defect to the United States to protect themselves. As Marina tries to continue her dance training, she must also juggle more practical responsibilities, navigate Manhattan and Brooklyn and adapt to the new capitalist culture. At the same time, Soviet secrets are casting a long shadow from halfway around the world, and what her family knows about the government cover-ups becomes the crux of this dark tale. Kiem brings the 1980s landscapes of gritty Brooklyn and frozen Moscow to life with a suspenseful story of overprotected teenager meets international intrigue.

Melanie

 
 

The Dark Side of the Moon

The Dark Side of the Moon

posted by:
October 29, 2013 - 7:00am

The Shade of the MoonA meteor knocked the moon dangerously close to the earth and brought about tsunamis that wiped out whole continents and blocked the sun from reaching the planet, permanently changing everything. Susan Beth Pfeffer concludes her teen dystopian series with the fourth installment The Shade of the Moon. The Life As We Know It series follows the lives of a family and their friends as they grapple with the world they now live in and their struggle to survive as everything and everyone around them perishes.

 

Jon Evans and his remaining family have found themselves in Sexton, a heavily guarded community known as an “enclave” where the inhabitants are referred to as “Clavers.” His position in the prestigious town is always in jeopardy and his whereabouts are shrouded in suspicion. He, his stepmother Lisa and stepbrother Gabe gained entry to Sexton with passes given to them by another family. Jon takes advantage of the life he leads where he has access to purified air, education, health care and food while others work while exposed to chemicals in the air.

 

One wrong move can be fatal and no one is safe from the prying eyes of the officials who run Sexton. They will do whatever they need to do in order to maintain the safety and order of their community. The Shade of the Moon examines what the world could be like in the event of such a tragedy and the lengths people will go to save the ones they love.

Courtney

 
 

Trusting a Memory

Trusting a Memory

posted by:
October 22, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for FracturedIn a world where nothing is what it seems and no one is safe to speak out against a tyrannical government for fear of disappearing forever, Kyla must be careful of the questions she asks and of every move she makes. In Fractured, book two of Teri Terry’s Slated trilogy, teenage Kyla has recovered some of the memories of who she was before she became a “Slated” and had her memory wiped clean of her past. Kyla is desperately looking for clues as to what happened to her friend Ben who disappeared after attempting to remove his “Levo,” a GPS and monitoring device fitted onto the wrists of all “Slateds” to keep tabs on them. Kyla fears that Ben is dead, along with so many others discarded by the “Lorders," those in charge of enforcing the laws of society.
 

When Kyla reconnects with Nico, a face from her past, she begins to “remember” things. But are they really her memories or imposters? Each step Kyla takes only leads to more questions, more danger and still people are missing. Kyla can’t even be certain if finding out who she was before she was slated will solve her problems or make them worse, but she knows one thing — she at least has to try.
 

Terry’s second installment to her trilogy is a fast paced read, aimed toward readers who enjoyed dystopian series such as Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games and Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life As We Knew It.

Courtney

 
 

Debate team, flash mobs and broken hearts

Cover art for The Beginning of EverythingBefore The Beginning of Everything starts, Ezra Faulkner leads a pretty happy life. He’s the popular star of the tennis team with a beautiful girlfriend. That all changes the day he catches his girlfriend cheating on him at a party. After storming out of the party, he is hit by a car. In an instant, his tennis career ends and he goes from the most popular student at Eastwood High to the most pitied. Robyn Schneider’s new teen novel The Beginning of Everything picks up just after what Ezra calls his “personal tragedy,” as he gives up his tennis racket and joins the debate team, makes new friends, reconnects with old ones and falls in love again.

 

As Ezra settles in with his new less popular group of friends, he meets Cassidy Thorpe, a former debate champion who dropped out of her old private school, deserting her debate team and leaving a trail of secrets in her wake. Cassidy and Ezra are paired up as debate partners and eventually become friends as they prepare for debate tournaments and participate in flash mobs. It doesn’t take long for Ezra to fall for the mysterious Cassidy, despite his friend Toby’s warnings. Ezra tries to get to know Cassidy despite her reluctance to open up.

 

Schneider’s story is a funny, realistic teen novel that deals with Ezra’s ability to overcome his “personal tragedy,” and deal with life’s many issues that come after. The Beginning of Everything is perfect for fans of John Green’s novels who are looking for a new book that’s funny, while at times heartbreaking.
 

Laura

 
 

Water Water Everywhere

Water Water Everywhere

posted by:
October 16, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Not A Drop To DrinkLibrarian Mindy McGinnis’s debut novel, Not a Drop to Drink, shows us just what it would take to live outside of civilization, doing whatever it takes to survive just one more day. Sixteen-year-old Lynn has spent her life defending her most precious commodity: her freshwater pond. The world’s water supply has run dangerously low, and the remaining population is struggling to make it at any cost. Some are packed into cities with strict rules for living and the ever- present threat of cholera looming. Others, like Lynn and her mother, make their own way, eking out a living in the country.

 

Their only neighbor, a mysterious older man named Stebbs, is their last link to the way things used to be, when people helped one another during tough times. When Lynn finds herself injured and alone after a violent attack, Stebbs helps her find her purpose and her place in the world. Lynn’s mother always taught her not to trust strangers – shoot first, ask questions later. What Lynn didn’t know was how strangers can become family more precious than the water she has guarded and how family, though bound by blood, can be really nothing more than strangers. Readers of teen dystopian fiction will be sure to find themselves loving Not a Drop to Drink.

Courtney

 
 

Secrets to Keep

Secrets to Keep

posted by:
October 3, 2013 - 7:00am

The Truth That's in MeOne day, Judith and her best friend Lottie both go missing. When Lottie is discovered dead several days later and Judith is nowhere to be found, the residents of her puritanical town fear the worst for their beloved girls. Several years later, everything changes when Judith appears on her mother’s doorstep with a terrible secret she has been violently forbidden to share with anyone in All the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry. Instead of being greeted with open arms, Judith finds herself shunned by all of those around her, including those she loves the most. In the time she’s been gone, the boy she intended to marry has moved on and found another, her father is dead, her mother and brother have written her off as damaged goods and the townspeople have drawn their own suspicious conclusions as to where Judith may have been all this time.

 

In her first novel for young adults, children’s book author Julie Berry creates a riveting story of the power that secrets can have over us. Written from Judith’s narrative point of view we see her find her strength even through her own silence. It’s a story of finding your own legs to stand on even in the face of pain, loss and tragedy. Readers who enjoy historical fiction with a hint of mystery and romance will find themselves unable to put this book down!

Courtney

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If at First You Don’t Succeed, Die, Die Again

A Midsummer Night's ScreamLove triangles, a cursed movie set, magic potions, gruesome murders; R.L. Stine’s newest teen fiction A Midsummer Night’s Scream has it all. Claire Woodward is a 16-year-old girl living a life of privilege in Hollywood. Her parents own a film studio and have finally given consent for her to act in one of their movies, the remake of Mayhem Manor. The excitement of being cast in a movie with her best friend as well as some notable actors is tempered when talk turns to how the movie set is cursed. The original Mayhem Manor was a horror film about six teens who get trapped in a spooky old house and one by one, die a terrible death. Shooting stopped after not one, but three of the actors died during the filming. Sixty years later the producers elect to reshoot the movie at the same location. Author R.L. Stine has proven to be a master of macabre with the success of his Goosebumps and Fear Street series, so readers will not be surprised when his newest novel takes a decidedly dark turn.

 

This story is part teenage romance, part horror story. There is a mystical element in the character of Benny Puckerman, who peddles magic potions, can only be seen by Claire and has his own agenda regarding the movie remake. Claire narrates the story in a casual conversational tone, at times directing comments to the reading audience. Those discerning readers looking for a sophisticated Shakespearean work should keep on looking, but if you are interested in a quick-moving, fantastical tale with a nice touch of suspense, A Midsummer Night’s Scream will really get your heart pumping.

Jeanne

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A Degree in Fandom

A Degree in Fandom

posted by:
September 27, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for FangirlIn Rainbow Rowell’s latest young adult novel, Fangirl, Cather is a huge fan of Simon Snow, a fictional Harry Potter-like book and movie series. Cath isn’t a casual fan, she’s the definition of a fangirl — she doesn’t just read the books and watch the movies, she goes to midnight release parties, writes well-known fanfiction and interacts with other Simon Snow fans online. The Simon Snow fandom has been Cath’s escape from the problems in her life for years. As Fangirl begins and Cath heads off to her first year of college at the University of Nebraska, she falls further into fandom.

 

Cath expected to room with her twin sister Wren, as they have all their lives, until Wren tells Cath that she doesn’t want to be roommates anymore. Cath is surprised and understandably upset. When Wren begins partying heavily at school, Cath becomes increasingly worried and feels isolated. Meanwhile, Cath has to deal with her standoffish roommate Reagan and Reagan’s potential boyfriend, Levi, who is in their room constantly and has definitely captured Cath’s attention. Cath also has to deal with the typical college adjustments — the dining hall, classes, meeting new people and romance, all the while maintaining her fangirl status.

 

Fangirl is a coming-of-age story about a girl enraptured in fandom who has to figure out how to deal with her changing life and how her life as a fangirl fits into it. The novel has excerpts from Cath’s fanfiction, which is an added bonus for anyone who has ever been a super fan. Others will be able to identify with Cath’s adjustment to campus life and her attempts to find her place in the world. Fans of Rowell’s earlier young adult novel Eleanor & Park will find Fangirl lives up to their expectations.
 

Laura

 
 

Holly Black to Visit Reisterstown Branch

Cover art for The Coldest Girl in ColdtownAuthor Holly Black will visit BCPL’s Reisterstown Branch on September 23rd at 2:30 p.m. to meet her readers and talk to teens about her new novel The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. Black has written many novels for children and teens, including co-authoring the bestselling Spiderwick Chronicles series. This dark new novel features vampires, but it isn’t the typical teen vampire novel. Black brings a new twist to vampire mythology in this spine-tingling story.
 

Seventeen-year-old Tana lives in a world that is a lot like ours. The big difference is that in her world vampires aren’t just found in stories. They are real, and they are terrifying. When someone survives being bitten by a vampire, that person is infected and becomes Cold. Those who have been infected become crazed, craving blood beyond reason. If they drink human blood while infected, they turn into vampires. Special walled cities called Coldtowns have been created to quarantine both vampires and the infected. Coldtown is a dangerous and terrible place. Most humans fear vampires and Coldtown, but some romanticize it and find it glamorous. They see the endless Coldtown parties that are broadcast on TV and the Internet 24/7. They don’t understand the horror that takes place there, so they think that they want to be part of it.
 

When Tana wakes up at a party to discover that all of her friends have been massacred in a bloody vampire attack, she finds that the only other person left alive is her ex-boyfriend Aiden who is now Cold. Tana is bitten during her escape, so she takes Aiden and a mysterious vampire named Gavriel to the nearest Coldtown. She knows that she has to go inside with them, but everyone knows that once you enter Coldtown, you won’t ever leave.

 

The Coldest Girl in Coldtown is a compulsively readable novel that is written for teens but will also appeal to adult readers. Tana is a strong heroine, and Black’s world of vampires is unique and compelling. Readers will race through this story, eager to find out what happens to Tana next.
 

Click the link for more information about this exciting opportunity for teens to meet Holly Black, or contact the the Reisterstown Branch.

Beth

 
 

Seeking Solace in Revenge

Seeking Solace in Revenge

posted by:
September 18, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for Premidiated What would you do if someone caused your best friend to attempt suicide? Josin L. McQuein’s upcoming novel Premeditated describes just how far one devastated teen goes to exact revenge for her comatose best friend. Claire is more than Dinah’s best friend; she is her 14-year-old cousin too. Claire attempts to kill herself leaving her best friend and close family wondering why. Though her attempt was unsuccessful, she unfortunately hits her head on the sink as she passes out and is living in a coma, teetering on the brink.
 

Dinah is devastated when she hears about her cousin and she searches Claire’s room to find her diary and discover what caused her to feel like she needed to commit suicide. After reading the diary, Dinah uncovers that it was because of a 17-year-old prep school boy she’d been spending time with. Upon learning this, Dinah decides that she is going to destroy his life like he destroyed Claire’s. Before she can set her plan in motion, she must transform her edgy and alternative persona into a prep school Barbie doll for the covert mission.
 

This book follows Dinah in her efforts to find retribution and solace in bringing her own special kind of justice. The novel unfolds the story of Dinah’s transformation as well as Claire’s secret past and how she came to feel that suicide was her best option. Readers who enjoy Premeditated, may also enjoy Laurie Halse Anderson’s book Speak, which unfolds much like Claire’s story.
 

Randalee

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