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Origin Story

DangerousMaisie’s middle name is Danger because her parents thought it would be funny, but she embraces her middle name when she goes on the adventure of her life. Dangerous, a new novel by award-winning author Shannon Hale, is fraught with adventure and gripping storylines, a combination that makes it hard to put down.

 

Maisie has always dreamed of becoming an astronaut, and even though she’s never heard of a one-armed astronaut, she’s not going to let that stop her from trying. It’s no surprise that when she spots a contest for astronaut camp on a box of cereal she enters immediately, but winning the contest changes her life more drastically than she could have ever anticipated. 

 

After arriving at astronaut camp, Maisie is assigned a fire team to work with. Her team excels, and because it finishes in the top spot, it is given an opportunity to visit a launch site owned by the sponsors. Upon arriving, each member of her team is unexpectedly given a token beyond anything from this world, and it’s a gift they can’t give back.

 

With these tokens comes a new sense of purpose and responsibility. The group must learn how to use its gifts and work together to accomplish a common goal. The goal is at first ambiguous, causing the fire team to slowly weaken as a group and its members to go their own way. However, the team leader must learn how to reunite the group in an effort to have a positive global impact.

Randalee

 
 

What's Your Choice?

What's Your Choice?

posted by:
March 4, 2014 - 8:00am

DivergentAllegiantFourVeronica Roth’s bestselling dystopian novel, Divergent, is coming to the big screen in one of the most buzzed about movies of this spring. Divergent, starring Shailene Woodley, Theo James and Kate Winslet, will be in theaters on March 21. 

 

In Beatrice “Tris” Prior’s world, everyone is separated into factions based on their dominant personality traits. The factions are Candor, Abnegation, Dauntless, Amity and Erudite. Each person is given an aptitude test as a teenager. That is followed by the Choosing Ceremony, in which each person publicly declares which faction he or she will join. Tris grew up in Abnegation, but she has a secret. Her test reveals that she is Divergent, which means that she exhibits the traits of multiple factions. That secret could get her killed. Tris has a choice to make. No matter which faction she chooses, her decision will change her life irrevocably.

 

Divergent is the first novel in Roth’s blockbuster trilogy for teens. The series is fast-paced and compulsively readable. Although Allegiant, the final novel in the trilogy, was published last year, fans have one more book to look forward to reading. Four: A Divergent Story Collection will be published this summer as a companion to the Divergent trilogy. Four is a collection of short stories told from the perspective of Four, the popular character portrayed by Theo James in the movie.

 

Roth and the cast of the movie talk about the factions in this behind-the-scenes video. What faction are you? Take this quiz to find out where you fit.

Beth

 
 

Nature vs. Nurture

Nature vs. Nurture

posted by:
February 28, 2014 - 8:00am

UninvitedAre some people just born evil? In Sophie Jordan’s Uninvited, the answer is yes. In the not too distant future, advancements in genetic research will enable scientists to preemptively identify violent offenders with a simple blood test for Homicidal Tendency Syndrome. People identified with what gets nicknamed “the kill gene” are then segregated from the rest of the population for everyone’s safety. The public is warned to treat these carriers with extreme caution due to their vicious, unpredictable nature.

 

Davy Hamilton is the girl everyone envies. She is pretty, popular, has an amazing boyfriend and her gift of music has secured a place for her at Juilliard once she completes her senior year at her exclusive prep school. However, her life and dreams are shattered when she tests positive for HTS. Labeled with the genetic predisposition to kill, Davy watches as all vestiges of her near-perfect life disintegrate. Davy is uninvited to attend her current high school, abandoned by her friends and feared even by her own family. Uninvited chronicles the tragic transformation the HTS label inflicts upon her life and Davy’s fight to survive her new reality.

 

Treated as the cruel killer society knows she will become, Davy is assigned a new school that has a special class just for HTS carriers. Secured in a room in the basement of the school, with a floor-to-ceiling chain-link fence separating the teacher from the students, she first encounters her new peers. Whereas Davy could never imagine inflicting pain on another, this is not the case for her new classmates. An intimidating and fierce boy advises her of the need to make allies for protection in her new violent world. Conversely, she is shocked when another carrier, a boy branded with an H for violent behavior, intervenes on her behalf when she is cornered by a lecherous teacher.

 

The question of how the killer gene label alters the environment for the carriers is thought-provoking and profound. While some characters are clearly sociopathic, how society treats the apparently nonaggressive carriers pushes them in the violent direction just to survive. This is an exceptionally well-written story, and accompanying Davy on this journey of self-discovery is as fascinating as it is frightening.

Jeanne

 
 

Good Girl Gone Bad

Good Girl Gone Bad

posted by:
February 25, 2014 - 8:00am

AfterpartyEmma has always been a good girl—her overprotective father has controlled her every waking moment since her mother overdosed when she was young. After her mother’s death, Emma and her dad moved all over Canada and the United States, never staying very long in one place. Upon arriving in Los Angeles at the start of Ann Redisch Stampler’s new teen novel, Afterparty, Emma quickly finds a new friend in Siobhan. As the two become closer, Emma the Good takes a back seat and Totally Bad Emma takes over.

 

When Emma starts at the snobby Latimer school she is immediately made fun of by her rich classmates for wearing vintage clothes and not being rich enough to have her own horse. Siobhan rescues her and the two become best friends, and suddenly the opinions of her classmates matter less to Emma, with the exception of Dylan, her new crush. Emma and Siobhan spend hours together drinking, shopping and partying. Siobhan even makes a list of wild things Emma must do in order to stop being Emma the Good. Meanwhile, Emma has to lie to her father at every turn, sneaking out of her window to go out with Siobhan at night. As she becomes less recognizable as Emma the Good, she realizes her friendship with Siobhan might not be as healthy as she once thought.

 

Afterparty is a book full of scandal, backstabbing and partying, perfect for older teens who are fans of Cecily von Ziegesar’s Gossip Girl series or Lauren Conrad’s L.A. Candy novels. Stampler has written a book full of drama that will keep readers interested until the very last page, determined to find out how bad Emma becomes.

Laura

 
 

No Asylum Here

No Asylum Here

posted by:
February 19, 2014 - 8:00am

AsylumGo to a New Hampshire college for a summer prep program, only to find out your dorm was an old psychiatric hospital. Needless to say, you won’t be having a peaceful summer. In Madeleine Roux’s new book, Asylum, this is teenager Dan Crawford’s experience when he arrives for a program for gifted students. An outsider at his school, he sees this trip as a chance to be with like-minded students and finally have some friends. But his stay starts out as anything but ordinary when he finds a disturbing photograph in his dorm room upon check-in. Soon, he and two friends discover old patient records, medical instruments and more ominous photographs in the old warden’s office and in a series of hidden rooms, all of which hint at horrific treatment of patients and human experiments gone awry. To make matters worse, Dan begins having nightmares about the old place, receives strange emails and discovers some chilling connections between the history of the asylum and his and his friends’ present-day lives.

 

Staying away from anything too mind-bending or fantastical, Roux creates a good old-fashioned scarefest of a story, one where you’re holding your breath as the characters open up the next door or descend yet another flight of stairs. The suspenseful nature of the book and the well-developed characters will appeal to both readers of realistic fiction and horror/suspense. Similar to Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, Roux’s tale adds to the unsettling ambiance of the story by incorporating photographs from real asylums. Roux has left plenty of loose ends and unanswered questions for another book, which is due out later this year.

Melanie

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Growing Up at a Young Age

Growing Up at a Young Age

posted by:
February 4, 2014 - 7:55am

Cover art for The Impossible Knife of MemoryThe Impossible Knife of Memory, Laurie Halse Anderson’s latest teen novel, tells the story of Hayley Kincain and her father. Hayley’s mother died when she was a baby, and ever since it’s just been Hayley and her dad. When Hayley’s father returns from war with severe post-traumatic stress disorder, her life gets turned upside down. In order to deal with the memories that haunt him, he becomes a truck driver, driving all over the country trying to outrun his memories. After years of homeschooling Hayley on the road, he decides they should move back to his hometown. Since they set out on the road years before, Hayley has had to be the responsible one, taking care of herself and her father. She hopes that moving home will mean that their life will settle down. Her father isn’t getting better at home either. He continues to self-medicate his PTSD with drugs and alcohol, forcing Hayley to run the house and keep her teachers and friends from noticing.

 

At school, Hayley struggles to deal with her zombie-like classmates and teachers who don’t accept her unorthodox education. Her only friend is Gracie, a friend from elementary school who barely remembers her. Finn, another classmate, has made it his mission to get Hayley to write for the school newspaper in order to become closer to her. As she begins to fall for Finn, her father takes a turn for the worse and her life falls to pieces.

 

Much like Anderson’s earlier novel Speak, The Impossible Knife of Memory deals with many heavy themes. Hayley’s distinct voice and vibrant personality make her a character readers will identify with and remember long after they finish the book.
 

Laura

 
 

Gray Skies

Gray Skies

posted by:
January 30, 2014 - 10:19am

When you are harboring a sinister secret, who better to hear the confession than a convicted murderer on death row? In Annabel Pitcher’s new teen novel, Ketchup Clouds, that’s what British teenager Zoe is doing as a cathartic way of telling what happened when she became romantically involved with two brothers and ultimately was responsible for the death of one of them.

 

To sort out her thoughts and feelings, Zoe begins writing to Mr. Stuart Harris, who killed his wife in a jealous rage and is awaiting execution in Texas. Through a series of letters, Zoe (which is not her real name) chronicles her seemingly typical teen drama of the previous year. There was rising tension at her home, due in part to her father’s unemployment and her mother’s control issues. At a party, she met an amazingly unique guy, Aaron. What she didn’t realize until later was that Aaron was Max’s older brother – Max being the guy she is semi-enthusiastically dating. As the story progresses, her true feelings about Aaron and Max and the series of events leading to Max’s death come to light, as do some missing pieces of her family’s history. Suspense builds as Stuart’s looming execution date coincides with the anniversary of Max’s death.

 

Pitcher’s first novel, My Sister Lives on the Mantelpiece, was highly acclaimed for its down-to-earth approach to a unique premise, and in Ketchup Clouds she likewise employs engaging, candid writing to solve a compelling mystery: Why does Zoe feel she’s to blame for Max’s death? A refreshingly honest character with a unique outlook on the world, Zoe will resonate with teen and adult readers as someone struggling toward resolution after long internalizing her fear and guilt.

Melanie

 
 

ALA Awards Announced

ALA Awards Announced

posted by:
January 27, 2014 - 1:40pm

LocomotiveMidwinter BloodFlora and Ulysses: The Illuminated AdventuresThe most prestigious annual awards for teen and children's literature were announced by the American Library Association in Philadelphia today. Awards were given in a wide range of categories that covered all formats and age levels. A complete list of awards, winners and honorees can be found here.

 

The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. This year’s winner is Locomotive by Brian Floca, an exploration of America’s early railroads. Stunning, detailed illustrations and vibrant text bring the sounds, smells and strength of these mighty vehicles alive on the page.

 

The oldest of the medals awarded, the John Newbery Medal, is awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. This year’s medal recipient is Kate DiCamillo for Flora and Ulysses: The Illuminated Adventures, the story of a cynical girl and an ordinary squirrel. DiCamillo, a previous Newbery Medal winner, was recently inaugurated to serve a two year term as the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature.  

 

The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit. This year’s winner is Midwinter Blood by Marcus Sedgwick.  Readers will be hooked by the masterful storytelling that links seven stories of passion and love separated by centuries but mysteriously intertwined.

 

The Coretta Scott King Awards are given to outstanding African-American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African-American culture and universal human values. Bryan Collier received the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his magnificent watercolor and collage art in Knock, Knock: My Dad’s Dream for Me, written by Daniel Beaty. Rita Williams-Garcia was awarded the Coretta Scott King Author Award for P.S. Be Eleven, the continuing coming-of-age stories of the Gaither sisters, first introduced in One Crazy Summer.

Maureen

 
 

You Will Never Be Younger Than You Are Today

Sex & Violence by Carrie MesrobianHarrowing and piercingly realistic, Carrie Mesrobian’s Sex & Violence is a tour de force of contemporary teen fiction. Nominated for a 2014 William C. Morris Award for best debut of a book for young adults, this is the story of Evan, a disaffected 17-year-old who has been raised solely by his workaholic father since his mother’s death years earlier. Though clever and handsome, Evan and his father have moved so often that his connection to peers is limited. Evan uses his perpetual new-guy status to bed “left-of-normal” girls, including Collette, a teen who used to date one of Evan’s classmates at the boarding school they attend. When their relationship is discovered, Evan and Collette are brutally assaulted, and his father (at last realizing the seriousness of the situation) moves them to a cottage on a lake in Minnesota, near where Evan’s parents grew up.

 

After a long physical recuperation, Evan works to pick up the pieces of his shattered psyche. Through a therapist’s help, he slowly confronts the PTSD that he has been experiencing. He meets a group of teens, many of whom are spending their last summer at the lake before heading off to college, and they quickly add him to their group. The summer brings romance, friendship and unexpected turns for Evan, growing into a person his pre-assault version never knew had been inside him. Mesrobian deftly handles a number of themes, among them, the uneasy manner in which Evan approaches sex, the eventual fallout between Evan and his father, the highs and lows of casual drug use and how delicately trust can be won and lost. She weaves these into a concise package that is dark, with no easy answers, but is also not hopeless.   

 

The author does a phenomenal job getting the voices right, most remarkably that of Evan. The teens, all of whom are well-drawn, are written with pitch-perfect dialogue, and there are few wasted words. Mesrobian’s well-crafted debut novel is a brutally honest work for older teens from an author with loads of potential.

Todd

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Gothic, Punk Wonderland

Unhinged by A.G. HowardA.G. Howard creates a new twist on an old tale in her Splinte  red trilogy. Unhinged is the newly released second installment of this gothic and modern rendition of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Howard plays on the fact that Carroll based his novel off of a girl he knew, Alice Liddell. In Howard’s debut young adult novel Splintered, the reader is introduced to Alyssa Gardner who is a descendant of Alice Liddell.

 

When Alyssa was young she began to hear insects and plants talking to her, causing her to fear that she would go crazy like her mother and the other women in her family. The only way she can break the curse and free her mother from the binds of insanity is to jump down the rabbit hole and right the wrongs of Alice Liddell. Her adventures in Wonderland leave a lasting impression, and Alyssa becomes forever tied to the ethereal realm.

 

Unhinged picks up one year after Alyssa’s return to the mortal world, where she is doing her best to live a normal life. Because she is so consumed with preparations for prom, graduation, college and planning her future with her boyfriend Jeb, she tries to ignore the whisperings of trouble in Wonderland. When her wonderland mentor Morpheus comes to explain the dire situation, Alyssa is forced to acknowledge that there is a problem. Despite initially feeling like it’s not her problem, she quickly changes her tune when Wonderland begins to spill over into the mortal world.

 

Howard manages to weave together a rich combination of dark and gothic with colorful and creepy to create a unique world Tim Burton fans are sure to appreciate. This trilogy is one of those series that has the ability to cross over from young adult fiction to adult, so don’t hesitate to pick it up for a paranormal adventure.

Randalee