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Bound to a Forgotten Promise

Bound to a Forgotten Promise

posted by:
February 25, 2015 - 8:00am

The Oathbreaker's Shadow by Amy McCullochAmy McCulloch is an editorial director for a children’s publisher, so while this is her debut as a novelist, she is no stranger to the writing process. It’s clear from this novel that she carefully constructed a young adult series that weaves together mysticism, intrigue and suspense.

 

The Oathbreaker’s Shadow is the first in McCulloch’s The Knots Duology. This introductory novel is set in a fantasy world where a person’s oath is their soul and the consequences of going back on your word have a devastating effect. It’s the very foundation of the world’s structure and is infused in every decision each character makes.

 

Raim, the protagonist, is from a nomadic tribe of goat herders and has been raised as a warrior apprentice since he was 7. He was just a baby when he was given an oath that he wears as a knot around his wrist — a reminder of a promise he cannot remember. It’s this oath, made long before his memories start, which holds a mystery that could unravel his well-planned future or be the answer that saves a kingdom.

 

This historical fantasy is a fast-paced whirlwind of a ride that will leave you eager for more. Its sequel The Shadow’s Curse, though already published in Canada and the UK, does not yet have a publication date for the US. After The Oathbreaker’s Shadow, you won’t be able to wait for its release.

Randalee

 
 

Thrasher Thresher

Thrasher Thresher

posted by:
February 20, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for If I Fall, If I DieAge and ability share a unique relation in fiction. Sometimes authors choose to write prodigious characters who display impressive physical prowess and struggle with complicated emotions earlier in life. In his debut novel If I Fall, If I Die, author Michael Christie pits 11-year-old protagonist Will against the sprawled, dilapidated Canadian port town of Thunder Bay.

 

Will’s childhood has been squandered within the confines of his home, due to his mother’s plethora of phobias. A former artist, Will’s mother is so afraid of what exists beyond her front door that she cloisters herself and her son within their dwelling. Will stews in his room painting abstract art while nursing a burgeoning curiosity of the Outside, about which everything he knows is cobbled from brief interactions with delivery men on the porch. One such meeting with a boy named Marcus opens Will’s eyes to the omnipotent wonders of the woods beyond his yard, and leaves him yearning for adventure into town. Exceptionally wily thanks to his mother’s unique homeschooling methods, Will finds every opportunity to venture further into the world with his only friend Jonah, resorting to his recently acquired and rapidly evolving sense of perspective as a heading.

 

Readers will delight in Christie’s frequent and masterful use of similes throughout If I Fall, If I Die as they color Will’s Wizard of Oz-esque quest for humanity. A debut that reads as beautifully as it echoes, If I Fall, If I Die is for readers who enjoy coming-of-age stories or tales of adventure. Readers who enjoyed Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian will see shades of Junior in Will, and will definitely like his story too.    

 

Tom

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Macabre Medium

Macabre Medium

posted by:
February 5, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for WhenVictoria Laurie doesn’t just write about mediums. In addition to being a New York Times bestselling author, Laurie does psychic readings as well. One of her new novels, When, hits close to home with a story about a girl who sees the date someone is going to die, just by looking at them.

 

It’s unfortunate that Maddie didn’t understand what those numbers were in time to let her father know. She is now being raised by her mother who has become a severe alcoholic after her husband’s murder. In order to help support the family, Maddie’s mother sets up appointments where she can do readings for people who want to know when they or a family member will pass away.

 

While doing a reading, Maddie has to give a client sad news, and is met with skepticism and disregard. In an effort to help her client’s child, she calls to repeat her plea to keep her son close on his death date. When the boy goes missing, Maddie comes under scrutiny as the prime suspect, and rumors about her involvement run rampant through her school, making her life miserable.

 

Laurie has created a fast-paced thriller that is hard to put down. When is a character driven novel sure to entice not only young adults, but anyone looking for a page-turner in the same vein as The Naturals by Jennifer Lynn Barnes.

Randalee

 
 

ALA Awards Announced

ALA Awards Announced

posted by:
February 2, 2015 - 12:30pm

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat The Crossover by Kwame Alexander Firebird by Misty Copeland The most prestigious awards for teen and children's literature were announced by the American Library Association (ALA) in Chicago today. Awards were given in a wide range of categories that covered all formats and age levels. You can find a complete list of awards, winners and honorees on the ALA website.

 

The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. This year’s winner is The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend written and illustrated by Dan Santat. This beautifully illustrated tender tale of one imaginary friend waiting patiently to be picked by a child will captivate young readers with its creative spark.

 

The oldest of the medals awarded, the John Newbery Medal, is awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. This year’s medal recipient is Kwame Alexander for The Crossover, a novel in verse sharing the coming-of-age story of twins Josh and Jordan and their changing lives on and off the basketball court.

 

The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit. This year’s winner is I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson, the story of twins (again!) Noah and Jude, their fractured relationship and attempt to recover what they once had.

 

The Coretta Scott King Awards are given to outstanding African-American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African-American culture and universal human values. Christopher Myers received the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his vibrant collage combinations of paint, paper and photographed elements which bring to life the inspirational story of a budding ballerina in Firebird, written by Misty Copeland. Jacqueline Woodson, already the recipient of the National Book Award, was awarded the Coretta Scott King Author Award for Brown Girl Dreaming, her lyrical novel in verse of her childhood in the 1960s and 1970s.

 

Check out the winners and honorees at BCPL!

Maureen

 
 

Heartbreaking Loss

Heartbreaking Loss

posted by:
January 20, 2015 - 8:00am

I Was Here by Gayle FormanUnlike Gayle Forman’s previous two-book series (If I Stay/Where She Went and Just One Day/Just One Year,) I Was Here, is a standalone novel. Nevertheless, it feels very much like her previous novels. I Was Here is heartbreaking and beautifully written, with characters that are relatable. The novel begins after the funeral for Cody’s best friend Meg, who partway through her freshman year of college commits suicide. Cody and Meg had been almost inseparable since they became friends in kindergarten, and now Cody, left behind, must figure out how to deal with the loss of her best friend and her guilt at not being able to stop Meg before it was too late.

 

After graduating from high school, Cody and Meg began to drift apart as Meg left their small Northwestern town to attend college in Tacoma, Washington on a scholarship, and Cody stayed behind to go to community college. Cody felt like their friendship was changing, which only adds to her guilt when she receives Meg’s goodbye email. When Meg’s parents ask Cody to go to her dorm room and bring her things home, Cody sees it as a request she can’t deny. There Cody meets Meg’s former roommates and begins to discover more about her recent life which sets her on a journey to find out why Meg made the decision to end her life.

 

I Was Here is a heartbreaking story of young adults dealing with friendship, love, loss and guilt. Forman again deals with difficult issues like depression and suicide. Best for older readers, I Was Here is a strong follow-up to Forman’s other novels.

Laura

 
 

Finding Light in the Dark

Finding Light in the Dark

posted by:
January 14, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for All the Bright PlacesOne day during their senior year, Theodore Finch and Violet Markey find each other on the bell tower at their Indiana high school, each contemplating ending their lives. Violet saves Finch or Finch saves Violet (that part is unclear to both them and the reader), but what is important is that they both leave the bell tower alive and now their lives are inextricably linked. Jennifer Niven’s All the Bright Places tells the story of Finch and Violet’s lives after that fateful day.

 

Violet’s life has been forever changed since her sister died in a car accident that she survived. Since the accident, she hasn’t been herself — refusing to drive in cars, not writing, disengaging from her friends and ending up at the bell tower with Finch. Finch goes through periods of days or weeks when he shuts down and sleeps, but when he’s awake, life isn’t much better. He’s abused by his father who has left his family for a “better” one, and everyone at school thinks he’s a freak, so he spends his time thinking about death and ways he could commit suicide. But after the bell tower, Finch and Violet begin spending more time together — initially because they’re working on a school project together that has them wandering around Indiana, but eventually because they find they help each other grow.

 

All the Bright Places is “the story of a boy called Finch and a girl named Violet,” but it’s also a beautifully told story of grief, depression and finding yourself again. Niven has written a powerful, heartbreaking, romantic novel that is difficult to put down. All the Bright Places is set to become a film starring Elle Fanning.

 

Laura

 
 

Lumbar Grind

Lumbar Grind

posted by:
December 26, 2014 - 10:40am

Cover art for In Real LifeJournalist, novelist and activist Cory Doctorow has teamed up with illustrator and cartoonist Jen Wang to create an unprecedented graphic novel about a girl gamer who discovers real social issues lurking behind the colorful facade of her favorite online world. In Real Life is one of the first books written for the burgeoning audience of self-identifying girl gamers, which is growing at an exponential rate as more girls — and women — embrace their passion for gaming.

 

Anda, the heroine of In Real Life, enjoys playing Dungeons and Dragons with her friends during their lunch period, kicks butt in her Python computer programming class and walks the high school halls worrying more about surviving a tough boss fight than she does about staying fashionably relevant. With her mother’s blessing (and credit card), she delves into the digital world of Coarsegold Online and becomes totally enthralled, allying herself with a guild of other like-minded girl gamers. Quests call Anda and a feisty guildmate to a hidden verdant enclave lousy with gold farmers — players who repeatedly collect valuable items to sell to other players for real money. Anda and her friend defeat the illicit farmers and take their items and gold to stymie the questionable practice.

 

Initially, Anda is excited to be completing quests and leveling up her character, but after a gold farmer shows some compassion and helps her obtain a rare item, she begins to ponder the consequences of her actions. Who are the other players behind these foreign avatars? Why do they congregate in droves and move around in secrecy? What does "Ni Hao" mean? And most importantly, what happens when they’re killed and lose their farming progress?

 

Doctorow’s purpose-driven storyline presents many social issues that may be unknown to people who have yet to be acquainted with online gaming, and Wang’s adorable artwork inspires a world teeming with vibrant beauty and softens the blow of an otherwise rough reality check. In Real Life is a great read for anyone who enjoys young adult graphic novels, and is essential for MMO and gaming fanatics.

Tom

 
 

Not for the Faint of Heart

Not for the Faint of Heart

posted by:
December 23, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Laughing at My NightmareOne of Shane Burcaw's biggest goals was getting people to see past his disability. It's fair to say he accomplishes that and more in his candid new memoir, Laughing at My Nightmare. Even the title suggests some of the self-deprecating humor that helps shape the amusing but bittersweet tone of Burcaw’s story. Saddled with spinal muscular atrophy at age 2, the 21-year-old has been in a wheelchair his whole life, but that's not what this young man’s story is about. It’s about figuring out how to live a life as close to normal and sharing his daily successes and failures along the way.

 

There is no cure for Burcaw’s condition. His body does not produce the enzyme necessary for producing and maintaining muscle tissue. His body is failing him, but he refuses to fail his body. Disease aside, the Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, native is just a normal guy. He hangs out with his buddies, admits to liking girls and goofs off playing video games. The difference is he depends on others to do everything for him, from dressing to toileting. He has a hard time when it comes to fitting in with others with disabilities. The fact that he doesn’t want sympathy comes through loud and clear.

 

Burcaw shares his experiences through his blog, (also called "Laughing at My Nightmare"), where humor is an integral component. He figured there were people out there who would want to know what life for a severely disabled person is like. So he starts writing about sex, fear of dying, questions about God. Before he knew it, he had several thousand followers and was soon embarking on a national tour to raise money and awareness for his disease. Burcaw’s story is not without its somber moments. With short chapters, black and white photos and text bubbles, he manages to strike just the right chord for what he is trying to accomplish. “What if we traveled to schools and talked about humor and positivity?” he says, “We could help kids see that life is what they made it.” Teens and adults will find much to like in Burcaw’s heartfelt journey.

 

Cynthia

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Holiday Cheer

Holiday Cheer

posted by:
December 18, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for My True Love Gave To MeMy True Love Gave to Me is a collection of 12 holiday stories from young adult authors like Rainbow Rowell, Stephanie Perkins, Laini Taylor and David Levithan, among others. Each story is unique — some are realistic, romantic stories set at Christmas or New Year’s Eve celebrations, others are fantasy stories filled with elves or set in far-off lands. They’re all sure to put readers in the holiday mood!

 

Though each story is delightful, Stephanie Perkins’ “It’s a Yuletide Miracle, Charlie Brown” was my personal favorite. Perkins, who is also the editor of My True Love Gave to Me, brings holiday romance into readers’ lives with Marigold and North’s story. When Marigold buys a tree at North’s family Christmas tree lot, he agrees to help her carry the tree across the street to her apartment, not knowing the night of adventures this decision will bring. Other stories deal with lesser known holiday traditions, like Holly Black’s “Krampuslauf” about a group of teenagers who live in a town who have an annual celebration for “Saint Nick’s creepy buddy, the Krampus.” Gayle Forman’s “What the hell have you done, Sophie Roth?” follows Sophie, a freshman at a college in the middle of nowhere, who is sad to be away from her mother on the last night of Hanukkah. Other stories are totally fantastical, like Laini Taylor’s “The Girl Who Woke the Dreamer,” set on the Isle of Feathers, where a girl named Neve must face the Advent traditions of her home.

 

Perkins did a wonderful job editing a diverse group of stories dealing with holiday traditions both real and imaginary. My True Love Gave to Me is a great holiday read, especially for those looking to find new teen authors to enjoy in the future. As an added bonus, make sure to pay close attention to the cover, as you can see the couples from each of the stories!

Laura

 
 

Who’s Ready for an Audrey Hepburn Marathon?

Being Audrey HepburnOh Yeah, Audrey!The icon of timeless style for the 20th century, Audrey Hepburn has left a legacy of grace and compassion through her movies, her images and her work with UNICEF. Young adult publishers have picked up on the popularity of all-things-Audrey with the publication of two novels this fall, Being Audrey Hepburn by Mitchell Kriegman and Oh Yeah, Audrey! by Tucker Shaw.

 

“Here’s the big secret—Audrey Hepburn is the cure for everything,” says Lisbeth, a bored 19-year-old New Jersey diner waitress in Being Audrey Hepburn. Audrey fans and those who remember Kriegman’s classic Nickelodeon sitcom Clarissa Explains It All will cheer as Lisbeth gets into some wild escapades. Stuck meeting the demands of her alcoholic mother and explosive older sister, Lisbeth spends quality time by herself in a hall closet watching Breakfast at Tiffany’s on a loop and writing a fashion blog titled “Shades of Limelight.” The only people she can depend on for support are her best friend Jess and her grandmother, Nan, who shares her love of Audrey.

 

When Jess needs help at her job at the Met, she rewards Lisbeth with a glimpse of one of the most iconic dresses ever worn: the black Givenchy dress Holly Golightly dons at the open of Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Begging and pleading with Jess, Lisbeth puts on the dress and finds herself at the Met gala. Suddenly, she’s the mysterious It-Girl on Page Six. Pop stars and fashion designers are blowing up her phone with text messages. Her humble fashion blog goes viral. Paparazzi are snapping pictures of her everywhere. Can Lisbeth keep herself grounded in her new-found fame, or will she forget her real friends for a chance to be in the spotlight?

 

In Oh Yeah, Audrey!, teen Gemma Beasley has landed in New York City for the weekend of her life, chock-full of Audrey-inspired events and recreating some of the most famous scenes from Breakfast at Tiffany’s. The author of a popular Audrey Tumblr called “Oh Yeah, Audrey!,” she sets out to finally meet some of her best Internet friends in person: the flamboyant Brian, the sarcastic Trina and even Telly, who trolls the site. But when Gemma meets up with Dusty, a handsome “almost” stranger, he promises her something more special than just an ode to her favorite icon: a chance to wear one of Audrey’s dresses from the film. Will Gemma abandon her friends and her grand plans to spend her weekend with mysterious Dusty, or will she continue with the careful itinerary she put together for the best weekend of her life?

 

Reading these books is a must for all Audrey obsessives and a wonderful companion for your own Audrey Hepburn movie marathon night. BCPL's collection feature many Audrey Hepburn's most iconic films on DVD, so pick up a few of your favorites, put on your little black dress and enjoy.

Jessica

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