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Librarians

It is Not in the Stars to Hold Our Destiny, But in Ourselves

Jepp, Who Defied the StarsFor almost as long as monarchs have held court, dwarfs have found a foothold – however humble – amongst their courtiers. More often for the amusement or the curiosity of their host royals, the role of a court dwarf was like to be as ignominious a position as it was privileged. It is into the world of this overlooked margin of court society that author Katherine Marsh first thrusts her appealing protagonist, Jepp, Who Defied the Stars.

 

Born to a loving mother and cosseted by the tiny close-knit community of Astraveld, Jepp has enjoyed a sheltered childhood.  As the son of the village’s only innkeeper, Jepp has become accustomed to meeting strangers and hearing curious tales of faraway lands. Over time too, he has become accustomed to being considered a bit of a curiosity himself, at least to the inn’s less frequent visitors. One night in his fourteenth year, Jepp’s quiet and comfortable life comes to an abrupt crossroads with the arrival of a well-dressed stranger. The courtier, known to the reader as Don, offers Jepp what appears to be the opportunity of a lifetime – a position as a court dwarf at Coudenberg Palace, the lush seat of the Spanish Infanta. Jepp’s decision to follow his stars to court will forever alter his destiny, for good and ill.

 

Out of the sparse strands of the historical Jepp and those like him, Marsh weaves a startlingly graceful and poignant tale. Readers will come to care for this vulnerable yet strong, sensitive yet brave boy as he leaves his sheltered childhood behind to follow and mold his destiny. At turns heart-wrenching and gentle, suspenseful and reflective, Jepp’s story is one that will resonate with teens and adults alike. 

Meghan

 
 

Teenage Clone Drama

Teenage Clone Drama

posted by:
December 4, 2012 - 9:01am

BetaRachel Cohn, a seasoned author of books for teens, takes her first steps into the world of dystopian literature with her latest novel Beta. The first in a planned four book series, the novel takes place on Demense, an island paradise off the coast of the mainland. Demense is an escape from the problems that exist on the mainland following the Water Wars. Only the most elite can reach Demense, and once there are served by clones who were created so humans wouldn’t have to do any work on the island. In the book, readers are introduced to Elysia, a teenage clone prototype. Within the first chapter, the governor’s wife, Mrs. Bratton, purchases Elysia as a companion for her children, and to fill the hole left by her oldest daughter. She recently left the island to attend university on the mainland.

As Elysia grows accustomed to life with her new family, she finds that she is unlike other clones—she enjoys food, she has desires, and she remembers her First, the girl from whom she was cloned. Initially, Elysia decides to keep her unique qualities to herself, but as she learns more about her island home and the process of cloning, she realizes there is more at stake than pleasing the family that purchased her. Cohn reimagines our world in Beta, like the worlds created in other dystopian teen novels, such as Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games or Scott Westerfeldt’s Uglies. Fans of dystopian novels will surely enjoy the first in Cohn’s series. This novel deals with a number of mature themes, making it a better novel for older teens as well as adults. The book keeps readers guessing right up until the last sentence, and leaves us eagerly awaiting the next installment in the series.

Laura

 
 

Come on Up for the Rising

Come on Up for the Rising

posted by:
December 4, 2012 - 8:45am

ReachedUnless you have been living under a rock, you know that teens are driving the literary and cinematic marketplace these days. Popular series such as Twilight and The Hunger Games have exploded into pop culture, and many adults are coming along for the ride. In the crowded market of dystopian teen fiction, Ally Condie has carved out a niche with her Matched series. The long-awaited finale is Reached, and fans of the series will be thrilled to discover what becomes of Cassia, Ky and Xander.

 

The three main characters have been separated as they serve The Rising, and the action begins early as the “rebels” take over the territories and distribute the plague cure. Until it is certain that everyone is recovered, healthy and safe, a quarantine is imposed. Ky is flying aircraft that carries the cure as well as supplies for those in need. Xander is a medical officer, directly treating the infected and distributing the cure. Cassia is working as a sorter, and her sabotage of the matching ceremony data is the impetus for the Rising. As the days drag on, frustration and loneliness lead all three to question the effectiveness of the cure and even the rebellion itself.

 

The main messages in Condie’s Matched trilogy are the impact of creativity and individuality on a society. The importance of creativity on the human spirit comes full circle in this final book, and the singing of the first non-Society song is a tear-inducing moment. The theme of individuality that runs through the series is mirrored in the three protagonists, and Reached is told from their alternating points of view in quick chapters. Ky, Xander, and especially Cassia all show growth and maturity in Reached, as each becomes more self-aware and less egocentric. Love is still their underlying motivation, but it is no longer the intense, gut–wrenching angst of the young but a more thoughtful and inclusive love. New readers should begin with Matched by looking for the highly appealing and eye-catching cover art that easily identifies this well-written dystopian series.

Sam

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Behind Mansion Walls

Behind Mansion Walls

posted by:
November 27, 2012 - 9:01am

The InnocentsSisters Charlie and Alice Flaherty are The Innocents in Lili Peloquin’s gripping debut that mixes a splash of The Great Gatsby with a dash of Gossip Girl. The duo arrives in posh Serenity Point, a beach town on the Connecticut coastline to spend the summer before heading off to boarding school. Their lives have changed drastically, and a mansion in Serenity Point is a long way from their tiny apartment in Cambridge. But in the span of just a few months, their parents divorced, their father moved across the globe, and their mother married the uber-rich Richard Flood.

 

The sisters approach their new life differently. Alice, the elder by one year, is more introspective, while Charlie is a free spirit looking for fun. Charlie becomes fast friends with the hard-partying, maybe-couple Jude and Cybil, while Alice is drawn to Tommy, the handsome son of a scandalized physician. The country club is a world full of secrets and Alice and Charlie grow increasingly shocked as they learn more about their stepfather, his family, and even their own mother. Just one year ago, Richard’s wife died from cancer and their sixteen year old golden girl daughter, Camilla, committed suicide soon after. Alice is intrigued by inconsistencies surrounding Camilla and starts investigating, but the truth proves to be highly disturbing. Things get really creepy when Alice finds photos of Camilla and realizes she is a dead ringer for the dead girl. And what about Alice’s clandestine boyfriend Tommy? Turns out he was Camilla’s boyfriend at the time of her death.   

 

The Innocents is the first in a new series which has something for everyone – mystery, romance, and good old-fashioned drama. Readers won’t have long to wait to learn what happens next with these compelling teens as the sequel, This Side of Jealousy, is scheduled for summer 2013.

Maureen

 
 

The Girl Without a Dragon Tattoo

The Girl Without a Dragon Tattoo

posted by:
November 27, 2012 - 8:51am

Don't Turn AroundThe real threat of today does not come from a foreign enemy, a natural disaster, or even a medical mystery. It lies in the bits and bytes of cyberspace, where crimes can be committed and identities erased faster than you can blink an eye. Those who navigate this modern-day battlefield are the true soldiers, and they are the catalyst for thriller author Michelle Gagnon’s first novel for teens, Don’t Turn Around. Knowing how to manipulate the system has kept sixteen-year-old Noa alive. She has been in foster care for over five years, using it when she needs to and then escaping into online anonymity. When she wakes up on a cold, metal operating table in a warehouse surrounded by doctors, guards and thugs, her survival instincts kick in and she escapes. Without money, clothing, or access to her online identity, Noa needs help fast.

 

Peter is a rich kid, the only surviving son of a lawyer and an investment banker. After his brother’s death, he retreated to the world of online gaming, eventually becoming accepted into the brotherhood of elite online hackers and creating the group ALLIANCE. While breaking in to in his father’s desk one night to help himself to the bourbon hidden there, Peter finds a set of files that seems to allude to large sums of money and terrifying medical experiments. Before he can discover more, the door is smashed in and a small army of black-suited men throw him down, grab his laptop, and tell him to give a message to his parents. Peter calls on ALLIANCE for help, and Noa answers his call, for a price. The two soon discover that they are running from the same enemy, and Noa is one of the test subjects in a twisted plot to cure PEMA, the disease that killed Peter’s brother.

 

Echoes of Lisbeth Salander ring through in Noa, a computer genius with few social skills who is distrustful of anyone in authority and who prefers to be alone. Gagnon twists threads of corporate espionage, bioterrorism, and government corruption into an edge-of-your-seat thriller. A good choice for teens who are asking to read Stieg Larsson or for readers who like a good corporate thriller that is not too graphic. 

Sam

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Perfect Is as Perfect Does

Perfect Is as Perfect Does

posted by:
November 20, 2012 - 8:15am

OriginPia, the heroine of Jessica Khoury’s novel, Origin, is a perfect girl, or so she has been told all her life. In fact, Pia is far from perfect, but she is immortal. For years, a team of scientists has been working to create an immortal human being, and Pia is their first success. She has been raised in Little Cambridge (better known as Little Cam), a research facility hidden in the middle of the Amazon. The scientists, who have studied Pia since she was born, raised her to believe that she is perfect, and trained her to take over their operation permanently once she has passed all of their tests.

 

Most of the process of creating immortal beings has been kept secret from Pia, as has any information about the outside world. Beyond the scientific training deemed appropriate by the project’s directors, Pia is kept largely ignorant. However, with the arrival of a new scientist, things begin to change in Little Cam; Pia begins to question her life and everything she has been taught. This pushes her to sneak out of Little Cam, leaving for the first time in her life, at which point, Pia meets Eio, a boy around her age. As their relationship develops, Eio tries to convince her that Little Cam is dangerous and that she should flee. The mystery deepens the more Pia investigates his claims and considers leaving.

 

Origin imagines a future drastically altered by scientific advancements. Pia’s investigation into Little Cam’s quest for immortality leads her to ask—at what cost? Khoury offers readers a thought-provoking story full of science, romance, and suspense. Teen and adult readers alike will enjoy Khoury’s debut novel.

Laura

 
 

Dystopian Dynamite

Dystopian Dynamite

posted by:
November 13, 2012 - 8:31am

CrewelReaders of the dystopian fiction genre will thoroughly enjoy Gennifer Albin’s debut novel Crewel. Albin has created a world which is fascinating and imaginatively detailed, with believable characters that are both likeable and imperfect. In the novel, the inhabitants of Aras are fortunate to have The Guild oversee their civilization. This governing body of men instructs the Spinsters in fulfilling the needs of its citizenry. Only the most gifted and talented girls are selected for the elite role of Spinster, whose job is to weave together substance and time. Through this process the population can be fed, sheltered, kept safe, and everyone’s life can run smoothly. 16-year-old Adelice Lewys is an extraordinarily gifted girl who would be an obvious selection for this elite role. However, since she was a young girl, her parents have secretly been training her to be clumsy and awkward in an attempt to hide her ability from the Guild.

 

If Adelice fails to prove she can weave during “testing” she can look forward to a life just like her mother’s. She will have a prearranged marriage, a job determined for her, possibly as a secretary or a teacher, but most important to Adelice, she will be allowed to maintain contact with her family. To pass the Guild’s test means being taken away to the Western Coventry, never to see her parents or sister again and unfortunately this is just the situation she finds herself in. Events take a tragic turn when her parents try to help her escape before the official retrieval.

 

Watch out Suzanne Collins, step aside Lois Lowry, there is a new author in town that will truly captivate your fans. Crewel is fast-paced, with an intense plot, and will grip readers from page one as Adelice discovers the truth behind the perfection.

Jeanne

 
 

Departures and Arrivals

Departures and Arrivals

posted by:
November 6, 2012 - 9:11am

Ask the PassengersAsk the Passengers, by A.S. King, is a unique, yet highly relatable coming-of-age story set in a small Pennsylvania town. Astrid Jones’ life is complicated, to say the least. She may very well be the most responsible member of a household that includes a dad with substance abuse issues, an overbearing mom who only sees things her way, and a popular younger sister who teeters on the edge of perfect. Astrid’s holding down a job at the local Mexican restaurant, while navigating the demands of high school academia and the social scene as defined by her particular group of friends. She’s trying to come to terms with her own secret--she is increasingly attracted to a girl at work. She keeps her clandestine encounters with Dee hidden from everyone.

 

Who can Astrid open up to? As strange as it may seem, she sends her thoughts and love to the people on the airplanes that pass over. Surely they won’t share the same small-minded attitudes of everyone around her. Astrid lies on the picnic table in her yard in an almost meditative state, telepathically communicating with the passengers. King intersperses their stories throughout the narrative, making this novel an especially intriguing read. Teens will be instantly drawn to the acerbic Astrid, an immensely likable character surrounded by more than her share of drama. Known for her Printz- honor book Please Ignore Vera Dietz, and the critically-acclaimed Everybody Sees the Ants, King has become a favorite go-to author for well written, insightful realistic teen fiction.

Paula G.

 
 

Is Anything More Important than Being Popular?

SpeechlessChelsea Knot is superficial and selfish, a major gossip and a snob. There is actually very little to like about the main character in Hannah Harrington’s novel, Speechless. After lying to her parents to attend a party, and blackmailing a classmate for a fake ID, she drunkenly stumbles into a room where two guys are making out. In typical Chelsea fashion, she runs to tell her best friend, but this time spreading a rumor leads to horrific ramifications and one of the boys ends up in a coma, the result of a severe beating.

 

Against the wishes of her friend, Chelsea reports the jocks responsible for this act of violence, sacrificing her status in the popular crowd by turning in their peers. After reflecting how her words have been responsible for almost getting a classmate killed, Chelsea takes a vow of silence in order to refrain from hurting anyone else. At school she finds herself ostracized and bullied by those she once considered her friends. She endures the constant ridicule and abuse with the assistance of an unlikely support system.

 

The author crafts an amazingly heartfelt story about the true meaning of friendship and how kindness and generosity can help heal. With an authentic voice, Harrington depicts the metamorphosis of a self-centered teen as she discovers how it feels to care about others. Without saying a word, Chelsea is able to forge honest relationships while learning to forgive herself. What will it take for her to start talking again? Will it result in the old Chelsea returning? Will her new friends still like her? This story is one of soul searching, personal growth, and courage. Speechless compellingly represents the advantages of being your own person.

Jeanne

 
 

Fifty Shades of Crime

Fifty Shades of Crime

posted by:
October 23, 2012 - 8:01am

CrusherHigh school dropout Finn Maguire spends his days selling pseudo-food at the Max Snax and his nights watching tv with his stepdad, an unemployed actor trying to write his own perfect role. When Finn arrives home from work one night, he finds his stepfather bludgeoned to death with his 1992 Best Newcomer award. The pursuit of the killer drives the story in Crusher, the debut novel by Niall Leonard. 

 

In working-class London, corruption is rampant and Joseph McGovern (a.k.a. The Guvnor) rules the streets with an iron fist. Finn’s stepfather was using The Guvnor as a springboard for his script, spinning a loosely-fictional yarn about the crime lord and his subordinates, one of whom plots a violent takeover. The police seem doggedly-focused on Finn as the main suspect in the murder, so he decides to launch his own investigation. He fears that the script may have hit too close to home, so he begins at the Guvnor’s mansion. Playing dumb, he bumbles his way into a job so that he can keep searching for clues. He soon begins uncovering secrets and revealing connections that turn his world upside-down.

 

Leonard, husband of best-selling author E. L. James, has written for many British television series including Wire in the Blood and Ballykissangel. He packs Crusher with heart-pounding action, leaving the reader as breathless as a boxer in the final round of a bout. The raw language and violence make the novel an appropriate read for older teens and young adults. Recommended for fans of true crime or gritty realism such as Sons of Anarchy.

Sam