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Roommate Drama

Roommate Drama

posted by:
January 10, 2014 - 8:55am

Cover art for RoomiesRoomies by Sara Zarr and Tara Altebrando is a new teen novel set during the summer between high school and college. Elizabeth and Lauren live on opposite ends of the country, so when they’re paired as roommates for their first year of college at the University of California at Berkeley, they begin emailing to get to know one another and make plans for the fall.

 

Roomies begins in June, as Elizabeth sends her first email to Lauren immediately after receiving her housing information from Berkeley. Her enthusiasm surprises Lauren, who, after sharing a room at home with multiple younger siblings for most of her life, had been hoping for a single room. The girls continue to email throughout the summer, making plans and sharing personal details. At the same time,  Elizabeth feels herself becoming disinterested with her friends at home and caught up in a new relationship with a seemingly perfect yet complicated guy. Meanwhile, Lauren is dealing with the idea of leaving her family behind as she heads off to college, as well as her feelings for her coworker, Keyon. As Elizabeth and Lauren help each other work through their respective problems, the two end up in a fight that puts their relationship as future roommates in jeopardy.

 

Roomies is a fun, realistic story that deals with many of the issues that arise for teens during the summer between high school and college. The mix of emails and prose makes for an interesting story that teens are sure to enjoy.

Laura

 
 

Ned Vizzini, 1981 - 2013

Ned Vizzini, 1981 - 2013

posted by:
December 20, 2013 - 4:18pm

Cover art for It's Kind of a Funny StoryAcclaimed writer Ned Vizzini died Thursday at age 32 in Brooklyn. Vizzini was a successful young adult author, television screenwriter and essayist. His first novel, It’s Kind of a Funny Story, was published in 2006 and is the semi-autobiographical account of a high school student dealing with depression. Vizzini’s account of this high achiever who spends time in a mental hospital following a suicide attempt has become a contemporary classic in teen literature. In 2010, it was adapted for the big screen as a feature film starring Zach Galifianakis.

 

Vizzini’s other novels include Be More Chill and The Other Normals which also focus on outsiders and their struggles. His most recent project was a middle-grade series he co-authored with film director Chris Columbus. House of Secrets, an electrifying adventure, is the first in this series which reads like a movie. Vizzini also wrote for television, including the shows The Last Resort, Teen Wolf and Believe, the new show from J.J. Abrams premiering in March. His essays have appeared in a wide variety of outlets such as The New Yorker, Los Angeles Review of Books and The Daily Beast.
 

Maureen

 
 

Dancing with the Devil

Dancing with the Devil

posted by:
December 20, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for UnbreakableHow do you vanquish a demon? One day, Kennedy Waters is mourning the death of her mother and packing up her life before heading to boarding school, the next she finds herself on the run from vengeful spirits. Unbeknownst to her, Kennedy’s mom was a descendant of The Legion, a secret group of five individuals who unwittingly released the demon Andras into our world two centuries ago. Since that time, one blood relative from each family has been tasked with trying to protect the world from the demon’s army of poltergeists and ghosts. Unbreakable, a new novel by bestselling author Kami Garcia, takes the reader on the fast-paced and exciting quest of five teens determined to complete this job.  Ancient journals reveal a device they believe can be used to destroy the demon, however it needs to be assembled and the parts are hidden in different locations around Maryland. Together they must decipher the clues to some of the creepiest settings collected within the pages of one story and exorcize the evil spirits determined to protect their treasure.
 

Kami Garcia, a coauthor of Beautiful Creatures, has created another thrilling and captivating story.  Unbreakable, which was only released in October, has already been optioned to be a feature film. The novel is complex and frightening, yet has moments of tenderness and romance. Throughout the story the reader will empathize with Kennedy’s desire to belong to this makeshift family, and fear that she may not really be one of them. The sequel is due to be released in 2014, and I haven’t been this excited for a follow-up book since I finished reading The Hunger Games.

Jeanne

 
 

What price would you pay?

Cover art for Dead SetNew York Times bestselling author Richard Kadrey delights adults and teens alike with Dead Set. After the unexpected death of her father, Zoe and her mother must move to the Tenderloin area of San Francisco while they wait for dividends from her father’s life insurance policy. To deal with her troubles in the real world, Zoe escapes into her dreams where she finds comfort and friendship from her dream brother, Valentine. A mysterious something — or someone — has also joined them in her dream world.

 

Back in the real world, Zoe happens upon a dark and dingy old record store. Most people walk right past the back room with the beaded curtain, but Zoe is curious and goes inside. There she discovers a collection of albums that contain something other than music. The grooves on these records contain lives — souls of people who have passed on but lingered in this world. Emmett, the proprietor of the record store, promises to help Zoe reconnect with her father. All it would cost her is a piece of herself. It starts with a lock of her hair.  The next time, the price is a tooth. How much would you pay to spend another moment with someone you loved and lost? And at what point does the price become too much?

 

Kadrey is best known for his Sandman Slim series. This dark, twisted, stand-alone fantasy novel will appeal to those already familiar with his work as well as those who enjoy a quiet horror story with a strong, albeit sometimes lost, female character.

Christina

 
 

To Leningrad, With Love

The Boy on the BridgeOh, the romanticism of falling in love abroad, even when the city is Soviet-era Leningrad in the 1980s. In Natalie Standiford’s new novel, The Boy on the Bridge, Laura is an eager college student who's had a love affair with Russia since childhood. Studying abroad in Leningrad, despite the hardships of the time, is just another way to immerse herself in the culture and language. During a chance encounter, Laura meets Alyosha, a mysterious young man who defies the profile of the typical Soviet youth. He questions his government, is scornful of the blind devotion Russians have towards their leaders and is fascinated by all things American, including Laura. Unfortunately, all of these qualities make him a target for the KGB, and Laura becomes increasingly afraid for Alyosha’s safety, especially as she falls in love with him. But in a time of strained American-Soviet relations, when many Russians dream of escaping to the West by any means possible, can she really trust Alyosha’s affections?

 

Beautifully written and peppered with details about Soviet food, culture, manners, housing and customs, The Boy on the Bridge transports readers to frozen Leningrad in all its authenticity. Standiford presents a unique and nuanced love story with realistic characters and an honest look at Soviet Russia with its many complexities and contradictions. Like her main character, she spent a college semester abroad in Leningrad, and photos and information on her website provide context and visuals for what is in the story. In a recent interview in Baltimore magazine, Standiford, a Baltimore native, also answers questions about how this story differs from her own study abroad experience and shares some information about her upcoming books.

Melanie

 
 

After Life

After Life

posted by:
December 3, 2013 - 7:00am

In the AfterImagine one day you are at home watching TV and the world just… collapses. You don’t know what has happened to anyone you know, you can’t get your parents or anyone on the phone. At one point, you even go through the phone book calling every number you can, hoping someone answers—they don’t. You hear shooting and screaming in the streets until eventually you hear nothing. Good thing your mom was a paranoid government official and surrounded your house with a huge electric fence that keeps out whatever it is that is out there. Good thing your dad was an environmental enthusiast who installed solar panels and a vegetable garden on your roof so you have power and a food source once the world goes dark. In Demitria Lunetta’s debut novel, In the After, 16-year-old Amy finds herself in this very situation.

 

Amy learns how to survive in her fortified home by eating the vegetables her father grew and rationing the remaining food in her fridge and pantry. She learns that whatever is prowling the streets retreats once the sun goes down and that as long as she remains completely quiet, she is safe. Eventually when her food begins to run out, she must venture out to scavenge. She walks to the nearby stores in her socks to stay as quiet as possible. One day she makes an unexpected and life-altering discovery, a baby girl sitting on the floor of the supermarket.

 

Amy’s world has changed and she doesn’t know why. When her home becomes threatened, she and the girl she named “Baby” embark on an escape that leads them only to more questions and less answers. Lunetta’s first novel, the first in a series, will appeal to readers of science fiction and dystopian worlds.

Courtney

 
 

Paranormal Quest

Paranormal Quest

posted by:
November 20, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art ofr The Dream ThievesThe Dream Thieves, book two in Maggie Stiefvater’s four-book Raven Cycle series picks up after Gansey, Adam, Ronan and Blue woke the ley lines around the town of Henrietta at the end of The Raven Boys. Things are changing around them in ways none of them would have expected, ways that impede their search for the resting place of the legendary Welsh King Glendower. The second book raises the stakes of their quest and adds to the already richly detailed paranormal world that Stiefvater created in the first book.
 

Throughout the story, each of the main characters is distracted in some way from their hunt for Glendower. Gansey becomes frustrated with developments in his friendships with Adam and Ronan, and his inability to understand them. Adam has started distancing himself from his friends as a result of his personal involvement in waking the ley lines and his fear of being dependent on his rich Aglionby friends. Meanwhile, Blue becomes increasingly concerned about the prediction that her kiss will kill her one true love, which is further complicated by the love triangle forming between her, Adam and Gansey. All the while, Ronan, whose storyline takes precedence in The Dream Thieves, reveals that he can pull things from his dreams. This trait, inherited from his murdered father, is putting his life and the lives of his friends in danger as new evils come to Henrietta.
 

As their storylines seem to diverge from the search for Glendower, readers eventually find that all the stories come together and their quest takes a new and unexpected turn. The Dream Thieves’ many mysteries will keep readers enthralled, and the novel’s cliffhanger will leave them eagerly awaiting the third book in the series.

Laura

 
 

Falling in Love in a Day

Falling in Love in a Day

posted by:
November 7, 2013 - 7:00am

Just One YearJust One Year, the sequel to Gayle Forman’s teen novel Just One Day is the conclusion to Allyson and Willem’s whirlwind love story, told this time from Willem’s perspective. Picking up from when Allyson and Willem were separated in Paris, Just One Year follows Willem as he wakes up there, alone, confused and missing Allyson. After their day in Paris, Willem only knows Allyson as Lulu, a nickname he gave her based on her resemblance to actress Louise Brooks. Despite the small amount of time they spent together, their feelings for each other are strong.  Just as Allyson searched for Willem, tried to get over him and find herself in Just One Day, Willem does much the same in Just One Year.

 

As Willem travels the world, readers are taken along on his physical and emotional journey. Those who read both books will see the number of close misses Allyson and Willem had during the year following their single day together in Paris. But most of all, readers will enjoy learning who Willem really is. His secretive nature in Just One Day kept readers and Allyson second-guessing his motives. However in Just One Year, Willem’s character and his struggles are shown, and Forman makes him a relatable character.

 

For those who have read Just One Day and patiently (or not so patiently) waited for the conclusion, Just One Year will not disappoint. Forman writes a heartfelt end to Allyson and Willem’s love story, which romance fans will enjoy. As an added bonus, readers will feel like they have traveled the world with Allyson and Willem by the end of the two books. As she previously did with If I Stay and Where She Went, Forman does a fabulous job telling one story from two perspectives.

Laura

 
 

Going, Going, Gone

Going, Going, Gone

posted by:
November 5, 2013 - 7:00am

The Rules for DisappearingDancer, Daughter, Traitor, SpyLife on the run might appear glamorous. Travelling to new places, assuming new names and identities, and trying out new living arrangements all seem like obvious perks. But as the young heroines of two new teen novels learn, the truth is far from that.

 

In The Rules for Disappearing, by Ashley Elston, “Meg” (her latest identity) and her family have been in the Witness Protection Program for eight months, and have already lived in six different places. She is tired of the subpar housing and lifestyle, but mostly she is worried about the toll the program is taking on her family: her mom is drowning her anxieties and depression in alcohol, her little sister is a shell of her former self, and her father seems oblivious to it all. Mainly, Meg just wants to know what her father did to land them in the program in the first place. Elston creates grounded characters, realistic depictions of small-town high school life and a suspenseful mystery that draws the reader in.

 

In Elizabeth Kiem’s debut novel, Dancer, Daughter, Traitor, Spy, Marina is a young dancer living in the lap of luxury in the Soviet Union, thanks to her famous ballerina mother’s connections. But when her mother disappears, Marina and her father must defect to the United States to protect themselves. As Marina tries to continue her dance training, she must also juggle more practical responsibilities, navigate Manhattan and Brooklyn and adapt to the new capitalist culture. At the same time, Soviet secrets are casting a long shadow from halfway around the world, and what her family knows about the government cover-ups becomes the crux of this dark tale. Kiem brings the 1980s landscapes of gritty Brooklyn and frozen Moscow to life with a suspenseful story of overprotected teenager meets international intrigue.

Melanie

 
 

The Dark Side of the Moon

The Dark Side of the Moon

posted by:
October 29, 2013 - 7:00am

The Shade of the MoonA meteor knocked the moon dangerously close to the earth and brought about tsunamis that wiped out whole continents and blocked the sun from reaching the planet, permanently changing everything. Susan Beth Pfeffer concludes her teen dystopian series with the fourth installment The Shade of the Moon. The Life As We Know It series follows the lives of a family and their friends as they grapple with the world they now live in and their struggle to survive as everything and everyone around them perishes.

 

Jon Evans and his remaining family have found themselves in Sexton, a heavily guarded community known as an “enclave” where the inhabitants are referred to as “Clavers.” His position in the prestigious town is always in jeopardy and his whereabouts are shrouded in suspicion. He, his stepmother Lisa and stepbrother Gabe gained entry to Sexton with passes given to them by another family. Jon takes advantage of the life he leads where he has access to purified air, education, health care and food while others work while exposed to chemicals in the air.

 

One wrong move can be fatal and no one is safe from the prying eyes of the officials who run Sexton. They will do whatever they need to do in order to maintain the safety and order of their community. The Shade of the Moon examines what the world could be like in the event of such a tragedy and the lengths people will go to save the ones they love.

Courtney