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Librarians

While You Were Sleeping

While You Were Sleeping

posted by:
October 9, 2012 - 8:01am

Anything But OrdinaryAnything But Ordinary, by Lara Avery, is a candid, touching story of a girl who needs to create a new identity for herself while struggling to cope with how everyone close to her has moved on with their lives, while she was sleeping. Seventeen-year-old Bryce’s promising future as a high diver is tragically derailed due to an accident that occurs during her Olympic diving trial. Her family, friends, and a greater portion of her hometown turn out to support her during the diving meet. They witness as the dive goes horribly wrong and she cracks her head on the concrete platform. When Bryce awakens in the hospital she learns that she has been in a coma for five years, and everything in her life has forever changed. There is no Olympic gold medal in her future, her best friend and boyfriend have finished college and are backpacking across Europe. Her parents now have a strained and distant relationship and her younger sister acts angry at the world.

 

Tired of being kept in the hospital under observation, Bryce neglects to tell her doctors about the stabbing headaches or the shooting pains down her back. Nor does she mention the flashes of visions she periodically gets of things that occurred while she was in the coma and sometimes even of future events. Although alarmed by this, she refuses to let it impact her recovery. Readers will admire and possibly envy Bryce’s inner strength as she fights to regain her mobility, combat loneliness, and cope emotionally with the changes that have taken place in those she loves. While reclaiming her life, she assists her family in the rebuilding of their relationships. Bryce discovers her world may not be the vacuum she initially believed when she first wakes up. This is an inspirational and poignant story that will leave you wanting to cherish each and every day.

Jeanne

 
 

Online Voyeurism

Online Voyeurism

posted by:
October 9, 2012 - 7:55am

ButterJournalist Erin Jade Lange turns to fiction to shine the spotlight on the epidemic of childhood obesity in Butter. Alternately chided by his mother for being too heavy and then for not eating enough, teenaged Butter cannot win the battles in his life. Worse than the bullying is the way his classmates, teachers, and even his father seem to look past him rather than at him. One day, a news story about an airline charging obese fliers for 2 seats prompts a reaction in Butter. Tired of being invisible, he decides to do what he does best…he will eat and eat and eat until he dies, and he invites his classmates to watch online.

 

The reaction to Butter’s announcement is swift and unexpected. Rather than prompting more taunting, the "event" gains him a morbid popularity. Everyone is talking not just about him but to him. He no longer sits alone at lunch, and everyone wants to wish him luck and make suggestions to his last meal menu. For the first time, Butter has friends, and it is intoxicating. If only things could be this way all of the time. But as his self-imposed deadline approaches, can he go through with it?

 

Lange’s writing is very matter-of-fact and her tough honesty blends well with her dry humor. She has created a fascinating character in Butter, who is by turns hilariously witty and tenderly heartbreaking. He gives voice to all of the geeks, nerds, and fat kids of the world who just want to be seen and heard.

Sam

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Another Opening, Another Show

DramaFans of graphic novelist extraordinaire Raina Telgemeier will be thrilled to get their hands on a copy of her latest work, Drama. Seventh grader Callie’s life revolves around the annual school theater production, and this year it’s the musical Moon over Mississippi. Callie’s not an actress; she’s all about the set design. Told in a traditional comic panel style and rendered in vivid full color, Drama follows Callie and her production crewmates as they navigate relationships both onstage and off. Intended for a slightly older audience than the autobiographical Smile, this graphic novel addresses not only the complexities of boy-girl relationships, but also those of boy-boy.

 

A former high school drama performer herself, Telgemeier stays in touch with her inner theater geek, perfectly capturing the immersive nature of working on a school production. Can inexperienced Callie pull off an incredible set design (including a real working cannon and a leaf-shedding tree) on a bare-bones budget? What will the new guys at school, twins Jesse and Justin, lend to the show? And will Callie ever find her very own leading man?

 

Drama is rife with in-the-know backstage details, from the somewhat creepy costume vault to the lighting cues and the set change challenges. Callie is a likeable, fully-realized girl who readers can’t help but root for. Telgemeier populates Eucalyptus Middle with a diverse group of passionate, relatable friends. Her drawing style portrays both expression and depth, realism layered with comic conventions. Drama stands out as an appealing, addictive graphic novel, a book that will no doubt be read, re-read, and passed from friend to friend.

Paula G.

 
 

Free As We’ll Ever Be

Free As We’ll Ever Be

posted by:
September 18, 2012 - 7:55am

Pushing the LimitsDebut author Katie McGarry’s edgy new contemporary novel Pushing the Limits was written for older teens, but it is also attracting the attention of Romance readers.

 

Echo Emerson and Noah Hutchins are high school seniors brought together by Mrs. Collins, the new social worker who has taken on their cases. Each of them is facing serious struggles. During Noah’s freshman year, both of his parents died, and he and his two younger brothers were placed in separate foster homes. He hates the system and is desperate to find a way to bring his family back together. Echo is dealing with the loss of her brother Aires, a Marine killed in Afghanistan. She is also trying to understand another event that rocked her world. During Echo’s sophomore year, something happened while she was visiting her mother. What happened that day left Echo’s arms badly scarred, but she can’t remember anything about it. No one will tell her the whole truth, and a restraining order now prevents her from having contact with her mother. Rumors about what happened to her have made her a social outcast at school. As Echo and Noah fall in love, they both search for the truth and work to repair their own lives.

 

This novel takes on loss, mental illness, and family dynamics. Echo and Noah are both damaged people, but despite their unusual circumstances, they are also both relatable characters. The narration alternates between their points of view, giving each of them a unique voice and perspective. Pushing the Limits marks Katie McGarry as a hot new author to watch.

Beth

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Hey Jude

Hey Jude

posted by:
July 17, 2012 - 7:55am

Before You GoThe summer before senior year is a season of firsts for Jude. He begins his first job at a food shack on the beach, and there he meets the girl who will become his first love. He also breaks with family tradition, and for the first time talks to someone about the darkness that surrounds them -- the accidental drowning of his sister in the backyard pool. Jude’s long-suppressed emotions come to the surface in Before You Go by James Preller.

 

The beauty of this book is in the drawing of the teen characters. The friendships between the boys are realistic and the dialogue is believable. No one is overly-pathetic or incredibly cool; these are everyday kids growing up in an ordinary town doing what teens do. They work “undesirable” part-time jobs, drink a little, get bored sometimes, explore dating and relationships, distance themselves from their parents, and start to realize that life may not work out the way you plan it.

 

Preller is the author of the Jigsaw Jones series and the children’s fiction title Bystander. He makes his teen fiction debut with Before You Go. Although it begins with a fatal car accident, this book is not action-packed. Readers drawn to emotional stories with subtle character development will enjoy this novel.

 

Sam

categories:

 
 

Pretty or Not?

Pretty or Not?

posted by:
July 3, 2012 - 1:49pm

The ListIt’s a given: high school, angst, and a painful self-consciousness go hand in hand for everyone except the “in-crowd,” right? Or maybe not. Siobhan Vivian takes a probing look at high school students in her new novel, The List, and explores the impact of being one of the infamous eight girls named on a cruel, anonymously authored cataloging of the prettiest and ugliest in each grade.

 

Being listed as the prettiest would seem to guarantee a charmed life for a high school girl and initially, ninth grader Abby revels in the extra attention garnered due to her appearance. Senior Margo feels somewhat entitled to be in the prettiest category, as was her older sister a few years back. Sophomore Lauren is surprised by her inclusion especially as this is her first year of public school, having been homeschooled previously. Struggling with a blooming eating disorder, junior Bridget rationalizes that making the prettiest list means her weight loss was—and is-- necessary.

 

On the flip side, receiving the label of ugliest should be devastating and for eleventh grade Sarah, always a nonconformist, the list pushes her to an extreme. Jennifer, hiding a secret, decides to celebrate her notoriety as a 4-time “winner” while beautiful queen-bee Candace is certain that her name was placed on this side of the sophomore list in error. Freshman varsity athlete Danielle just hopes her new boyfriend isn’t bothered by her being tagged as “Dan the man.”

 

Taking place in the week leading up to the homecoming dance, each girl has the opportunity to look at friendships and family in a new light; each must also decide if she embraces the label thrust upon her or forge her own identity independent of The List. Fans of realistic fiction will enjoy this title which reminds us to look inside not only others but ourselves, too.

Lori

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No One is to Blame

No One is to Blame

posted by:
May 22, 2012 - 8:07am

The Fault in Our StarsAdult readers are catching on to what many librarians have known for years—some of the most vibrant, intriguing books in the library are in the teen section. Word of mouth and media buzz have been building for teen lit star John Green’s latest title, The Fault in Our Stars, and for good reason. This smart, funny and altogether engrossing novel follows the evolution of a romance that begins in the most unlikely of places, a cancer support group for teens.

 

Neither Hazel Grace Lancaster nor Augustus Waters show up at the meeting with romance on their minds.  Hazel Grace, a 16 year-old with terminal thyroid cancer, is clinically depressed. Her mother is forcing her to attend. Augustus, a former high school basketball star, is dealing with bone cancer and the loss of his leg. And he can’t help but notice how much Hazel Grace resembles his late girlfriend.

 

Homeschooled since her diagnosis at age thirteen, her best friends are her parents. She spends much of her time reading and watching America’s Next Top Model. Her favorite book above all is An Imperial Affliction, about a teen with leukemia who is dying. Hazel Grace identifies with the protagonist, and finds it maddening that the novel ends mid-sentence without wrapping up important plot strands. She’s written the author, Peter Van Houten, numerous times without getting a response.

 

She and Augustus bond immediately, as “Citizens of Cancervania” who each have an insider’s understanding of what the other is going through. And the chemistry between them is almost palpable. Augustus spends a good amount of time gaming and watching movies; his book of choice The Price of Dawn, is based on his favorite video game. He understands how much An Imperial Affliction means to Hazel Grace, so much so that he uses his “wish” from The Genie Foundation to take her and her mother to Amsterdam to meet Van Houten and demand some answers.

 

Green has a knack for bringing his characters to life through believable, snappy dialogue. He is a true, honest observer and reporter of the human condition, making his books memorable. Hazel Grace and Augustus will stay with you long after the last page is turned. Readers will need to keep a tissue box close at hand, as The Fault in Our Stars is a tearjerker throughout. Teen readers as well as adult fans of character-driven novels and love stories against all odds will find much to like here.

Paula G.