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Baby on Board

Baby on Board

posted by:
April 18, 2012 - 10:35am

Lola reads to LeoPecan Pie BabyChloe, InsteadThe challenge of a new sibling is addressed in several new picture books which provide different spins on the blessed event. In Lola reads to Leo, by Anna McQuinn and illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw, our favorite book lover Lola is delighted to welcome new brother Leo. Lola helps care for Leo by sharing her love of reading. She brings him a soft book for his crib when she meets him, holds her best bear story while Mommy feeds him, and tells him a duck tale during his bath time. While many new baby books focus on the negative, this gentle celebration of family and reading offers the fun side of being a big sib!  Other Lola stories include Lola Loves Stories and Lola at the Library

 

Gia has heard all she can about "the ding-dang baby" that her mother is expecting in Pecan Pie Baby by Jacqueline Woodson and illustrated by Sophie Blackall. But that baby is all ANYONE wants to talk about.  Gia is worried about the upheaval ahead and already knows what she will miss the most:  “My whole, whole life.” Her emotions come to a head with a very public meltdown.  But Mama is able to calm her by showing Gia her important role in their expanding family. The subtle seasonal changes complement Gia’s changing attitude. This is an honest story about the very real feelings children have when faced with change.  

 

Molly already has a sister, but not the sister of her dreams.  “I was hoping for a little sister who was just like me, but I got Chloe instead.”  In Chloe, Instead by Micah Player, Molly colors with crayons while Chloe eats them. Molly loves books. Chloe loves to tear pages. Molly is frustrated but still sympathetic and Player uses stylized, colorful graphics and simple text to share her perspective. Player is a graphic designer whose work might be familiar to Target shoppers – he designed the branding for their popular Paul Frank line. (Learn more about this exciting new voice at www.paperrifle.com.) With this fresh story, Molly does come to see that Chloe’s personality can be fun too, and readers who are still on the fence about a younger sibling will see that there may be some good in it after all!

Maureen

 
 

One Cool Book

One Cool Book

posted by:
April 18, 2012 - 10:32am

One Cool FriendQuality picture books have the ability to engage both the youngest and oldest of readers with stories and illustrations that work together to capture the imagination. One Cool Friend, by Toni Buzzeo with illustrations by David Small, falls into that elite category of books we return to again and again. Tuxedo-clad Elliot is a “proper young man,” a boy who prefers quiet, solitary pursuits. When his scientist father proposes a trip to the aquarium, Elliot is unsure. He’s quickly enchanted by the penguins, asking his distracted father if he might have one. A misunderstanding leads a confident Elliot to pop the smallest Magellanic bird into his backpack for the journey back to their spacious, well-appointed home. His new friend proves to be a delight, if not a bit of a challenge.

Small works in pen and ink, ink wash, watercolor, and colored pencil, rendering charmingly witty pictures that add a surprising amount of humor and depth to the story. Readers will delight at the details Small works in to give depth to the character of Elliot’s father, details that begin to hint at the surprise that reveals itself as the story progresses. This is a sophisticated, nuanced book that demands multiple readings in order to fully appreciate the interdependence of Buzzeo’s highly original plot and Small’s clever illustrations.

 

Paula G.

 
 

Moose Meltdown

Moose Meltdown

posted by:
April 18, 2012 - 10:29am

Z is for MooseMost kids love alphabet books and this one will not disappoint. In Z is for Moose by Kelly Bingham, Zebra is organizing the alphabet into an A-B-C show and Moose cannot wait! His eagerness gets him into trouble with Zebra and the others.  See what happens when one excited Moose doesn’t get his way. Perfect for the youngster who knows the alphabet and who has felt disappointment! Beautiful bold pictures accompany the story and will make the reader laugh out loud. Poor Moose will tug at the reader’s heart. Fans of Mo Willems’ Pigeon books will surely enjoy this twist on the traditional ABC book. Check it out to see why Z is for Moose!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diane

 
 

Superhero Showdown

Superhero Showdown

posted by:
April 18, 2012 - 10:26am

Question Boy Meets Little Miss Know-It-AllIn a world of superheroes, Question Boy defeats Garbage Man, Paperboy, Mailman and others with his unending questions. Nobody had enough answers for him until he meets…..Little Miss Know-It-All.  In Question Boy Meets Little Miss Know-It-All by Peter Catalanotto, the two have a showdown at the park. Miss Know-It-All starts out strong, but Question Boy fights back with the dreaded “Why? Why? Why?” Showcasing two of the most annoying but utterly adorable traits of childhood, this brightly colored picture book will strike a chord with children and adults alike. A crowd gathers to watch the little boy with unending questions take on the girl with all the answers (even if she has to make some up.) Tensions rise. Who will triumph in this battle of annoying childhood traits? The artist complements his story with expressive pictures. By making community workers into superheroes, Catalanotto reminds the reader of that certain time of childhood when seeing the trash truck was an event and getting the mail could be the highlight of a day. (And adults, don’t worry, the author kindly lists Miss Know-It-All’s made up facts on the back cover, so there’s no need to research.)

 

Diane

 
 

Goofy Goodness

Goofy Goodness

posted by:
April 18, 2012 - 10:23am

The Crazy Case of Missing ThunderGoofiness abounds with the newest detective agency to hit the scene. The Goofballs are four elementary school friends with unique goofy talents like making funny disguises and nutty inventions. Jeff, Mara, Brian and Kelly have been a team since first grade. They solve mysteries. In The Crazy Case of Missing Thunder, by Tony Abbott, the gang is hired to find a rich kid’s missing pet. With the help of Jeff’s dog, Sparky (the official Goofdog), the friends ferret out clues and don disguises, all the while dropping puns and having a good time.

 

This series is sure to be a hit with young readers who enjoy a mystery and a good laugh. Your 2nd to 4th grader will giggle at the word play and have a good time. It’s a fresh silly series for your young reader who is ready for chapter books. Parents will love the underlying message of friendship and self-confidence the young sleuths demonstrate. Be sure to also check out the second in the series - The Startling Story of the Stolen Statue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diane

 
 

Children's Books at the Oscars

Invention of Hugo CabretHarry Potter and the Deathly HallowsAdventure of Tintin, Volume 1

It's no secret that many of Hollywood's most successful blockbusters are adaptations of popular books. The recent Academy Award nominees refect this, especially when it comes to family films. Here are some of the children's titles that brought magic to the movies this year:

 

The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick became the visually stunning film Hugo directed by Martin Scorsese.  This tale of an orphaned boy living in a Paris train station was the surprise winner of the Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished picture book in 2008.  Selznick’s creative style mixes pages of text with wordless pages that opens the reader’s imagination and invites them to create parts of the story for themselves.  Selznick’s newest title Wonderstruck is similarly illustrated.

 

The Adventures of Tintin is adapted from the classic graphic novel series of the same name written by Belgian writer/artist Herge.  Tintin is a young reporter who gets caught up in dangerous adventures as he completes his story assignments.  Modeled after the boy scout values, Tintin always knows what is right and acts in the most upstanding manner.  He is a role model for children (and perhaps adults everywhere.

 

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part II marks the end of the film journey into J.K. Rowling’s magical world.  The books are now over 14 years old and a whole new generation of readers are jumping on the Hogwarts express and following Harry as he learns to be a wizard and discovers both good and evil along the way.  The Harry Potter books have spawned movies, video games, board games, toys, websites, and even a theme park.  The audiobooks are magnificently narrated by the Grammy award-winning Jim Dale.  A fun fact—Jim Dale holds the Guinness World Record for creating 146 different character voices for the audiobook version of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows!

Sam