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Fall Picture Books

posted by: September 25, 2017 - 7:00am

 

Cover Art for After the Fall Cover art for Good Day, Good Night Cover Art for La La  La

Cover Art for Robinson Cover Art for The Wolf, The Duck and the Mouse

After the Fall (How Humpty Dumpty Got Back Up Again) by Dan Santat

What if you could no longer do what you loved to do? After Humpty Dumpty’s fall, he is afraid of doing what he once enjoyed -- perilous heights, bird watching from tall trees and climbing into bed at night. Caldecott Medal-winning author and illustrator Dan Santat brings us the story of Humpty Dumpty after his fall. Will he be able to overcome his fear?

 

Good Day, Good Night by Margaret Wise Brown, illustrated by Loren Long

This recently discovered story from Margaret Wise Brown was written in the same word pattern as her classic, Goodnight Moon. Little bunny embraces the morning with a "good day" to those he encounters and a subsequent "good night" when his day is done. While not a sequel to Goodnight Moon, it can be seen at an extension of it and is sure to please.

 

La La La: A Story of Hope by Kate DiCamillo, illustrated by Jaime Kim

In a mostly wordless picture book, Newberry Medal winner Kate DiCamillo brings us the story of a girl who is searching for what we all want -- someone who understands us. A lonely girl sings “la,” but she hears no response and keeps trying until finally, the moon answers back. This is an inspiring story that is executed beautifully by the illustrator.

 

Robinson by Peter Sís

No matter whether you’re a child or an adult, it can be difficult being different. Peter and his friends love playing pirates and decide to all dress as pirates for a school costume party. However, Peter’s mother reminds him how much he loves Robinson Crusoe’s adventurous spirit and makes him a Crusoe costume instead. Much to the dismay of his friends, Peter wears the costume his mother made him, and this choice of his gets him teased for being different. The story is based on an incident from the author’s childhood.

 

The Wolf, the Duck and the Mouse by Mac Barnett, illustrated by Jon Klassen

A mouse is swallowed by a wolf and just as he thinks all is lost, he makes friends with the duck who is already there. In the belly of the beast, there are candlelight dinners and dancing, which gives the wolf a stomachache. Mouse and duck actually enjoy their new life inside, but it is soon threatened by a hunter who is after the wolf. They must all band together to save themselves and their new home.


 
 

Dog Days of Summer

posted by: August 9, 2017 - 12:00am

Cover Art for Hey Boy Two new moving picture books depict expressive child and canine relationships. In Hey, Boy by Benjamin Strouse and illustrated by Jennifer Phelan, a young boy adopts a stray, but his family soon realizes the responsibilities are too much. The dog remains in the boy’s life, though, adopted by another couple living nearby. As boy and dog age, their relationship evolves, until another change reconnects the (now) young man and his (now) old friend. Phelan’s background as a graphic designer is evident in her stylized illustrations and use of generous white space on each page.

 

 

Cover Art for Stay Kate Klise’s Stay: A Girl, a Dog, a Bucket List is illustrated by her equally talented sister, M. Sarah Klise. Eli, a shaggy white and gray pooch has known Astrid ever since her parents brought the newborn home from the hospital. The two have been inseparable, sharing their lives and space together as they age. One day, Astrid notices that Eli’s fur is turning whiter, and he isn’t as quick on his paws as she remembers. She creates a bucket list of things that they will do before Eli becomes too old, and they ride a bike together, enjoy plates of spaghetti and meatballs, and simply sit and stare at the sunset. The illustrations are child-friendly and clearly show the aging process that both girl and dog must accept. Thankfully, neither book ends in tragedy, but both set the stage for helpful discussions between adults and children about the limited lifespans of our furry companions.     
 


 
 

This month's BCPL's Reading Challenge is read a book that takes place in Asia. Here are some of our suggestions. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. You can participate in BCPL's Reading Challenge with the help of a parent or guardian on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #Bwellread to earn prizes at the end of each month!

 

 BCPL Reading Challenge 2017 In Partnership with WBALTV

Cover art for And The Bollywood Burglary Cover art for Boxers and Saints Cover art for The BreadwinnerCover art for Chandra's Magic Light Cover art for Children Growing Up With War Cover art for Climbing the Stairs Cover art for The Contest Cover art for A Crack in the Sea Cover art for Cracker! Cover art for Diary of a Tokyo Teen Cover art for Dumpling Days Cover art for Every Falling Star Cover art for Factory Girl Cover art for The Forbidden Orchid Cover art for Four Feet, Two Sandals Cover art for Golda Meir Cover art for The Golden Sandal Cover art for Grandma and the Great Gourd Cover art for The Green Bicycle Cover art for Hush! Cover art for I Am Malala Cover art for I Remember Beirut Cover art for I Survived the Japanese Tsunami Cover art for Ibn al-Haytham Cover art for Inside Out & Back Again Cover art for Into the Killing Seas Cover art for Jungle Adventures Cover art for The Jungle BookCover art for The Knight, the Princess and the Magic Rock Cover art for The Last Cherry Blossom Cover art for The Last King Angkor Wat Cover art for Listen, Slowly Cover art for Little Lek Longtail Cover art for Lost and Found Cover art for Malala A Brave Girl from PakistanCover art for Mission Mumbai Cover art for The Monkey King Cover art for The Monster on the Road is Me Cover art for My Beautiful Birds Cover art for Night of the Ninjas Cover art for One Half from the East Cover art for The Paper Dragon Cover art for Patrol Cover art for Rutabaga Peak Cover art for The Persia Cinderella Cover art for A Piece of Home Cover art for Ronit & Jamil Cover art for The Jungle Book Cover art for Sachiko Cover art for SadakoCover art for Samurai Rising Cover art for Saving the Ghost of the Mountain Cover art for Season of the Sandstorms Cover art for Shalom Everybodeee! Cover art for Seven Days of YouCover art for Sherlock Sam Cover art for Shooting Kabul Cover art for he Imagination Station Cover art for Ticket to India Cover art for Tiger Boy Cover art for Tuko and the Birds Cover art for The Turtles of Oman Cover art for Vietnam Cover art for Women Heroes of World War IICover art for Year of the Jungle Cover art for Let's Celebrate Diwali Cover art for The Nian Monster Cover art for The Shady Tree


 
 

Dino-mite Picture Books

posted by: March 15, 2017 - 8:00am

Cover art for How Do Dinosaurs Choose Their Pets?Cover art for Dino-RacingCover art for Dinosaurs in DisguiseIf your little one is besotted by brontosauruses and infatuated with iguanodons, here are three new picture books from acclaimed authors and illustrators to satisfy their undying devotion to dinosaurs.

 

The latest in Jane Yolen and Mark Teague’s popular series is How Do Dinosaurs Choose Their Pets? Written in perfect rhyming couplets, the first half of this picture book explains, with hilarious accompanying illustrations, how a dinosaur should not behave, before explaining the proper protocols. The dinosaurs are colorfully illustrated, and smaller versions on the inside cover let curious readers know the names of each.

 

Dino-Racing by Lisa Wheeler, with illustrations by Barry Gott, is the ninth book in a series about sports-loving dinosaurs. Young readers will be riveted as the dinosaurs compete in a drag race, a three-day off-road trek through the desert and, finally, a stock car race. Little ones will learn more about cars than the crustaceous period, and NASCAR families will especially appreciate this one.

 

In Dinosaurs in Disguise by Stephen Krensky and illustrator Lynn Munsinger, a young protagonist imagines that the dinosaurs are not extinct, but merely hiding in plain sight. Amusing illustrations depict dinosaurs disguised as camels, pilgrims and even Santa Claus. The visuals get even funnier when the boy imagines the disasters that would ensue if dinosaurs came out of hiding and attempted to integrate with modern society.


 
 

Local Interest Picture Books

posted by: March 6, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Poe’s Road Trip to Ravens GamedayCover art for The Autobiography of a Pigeon Named PeteCover art for Night-Night MarylandWhat’s more exciting than cracking open a book and recognizing your own neighborhood? Here are three new picture books featuring fun and history from the Baltimore area.

 

First, we have Poe’s Road Trip to Ravens Gameday written by the Ravens mascot Poe and illustrated by Brian Martin. Poe begins his week pumping iron at Merritt Athletic Club, shares his favorite story (The Raven by Edgar Allan Poe, of course) on the Ravens Bookmobile, visits Maryland’s capital city, goes down the ocean, visits several Baltimore-area landmarks and ends the week on game day at M&T Bank Stadium. Anyone can appreciate this jaunt around Maryland, but football fans will be especially enamored.

 

For another exciting tale penned by a local bird, check out The Autobiography of a Pigeon Named Pete: A True Baltimore Story by Pete the Pigeon, interpreted by Gary Meyers and illustrated by Stephanie Helgeson. This book tells the true tale of a pigeon with ordinary beginnings in an ordinary Baltimore row home who went on to live a long, happy and extraordinary life with his “person” Muriel. Although the story is largely based on news articles, author Meyers has a special connection to this special pigeon — Muriel is his mother.

 

Finally, we have Night-Night Maryland: A Sleepy Bedtime Rhyme by Katherine Sully and illustrated by Helen Poole. Young readers will recognize the Baltimore-centric landmarks, from sleeping animals at the Maryland Zoo and the ducklings of Patterson Park to the quiet darkness of Fort McHenry and Port Discovery at night. The short, pleasant rhymes make for a nice final book before bed.     


 
 

This month's BCPL's Reading Challenge is read a book recommended by a librarian. Here are some of our suggestions; select any title to learn more or to request a copy. You can participate in BCPL's Reading Challenge with the help of a parent or guardian on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram with #Bwellread to earn prizes at the end of each month!

 

 BCPL Reading Challenge 2017 In Partnership with WBALTV

Cover art for And the Trees Crept In Cover art for As Brave As You Cover art for Asking for It Cover art for The Bad Beginning Cover art for The Best Man Cover art for Booked Cover art for Crooked Kingdom Cover art for Du Lz Tak? Cover art for A Family is a Family is a Family Cover art for The First Step Cover art for Freedom in Congo Square Cover art for Ghosts Cover art for Giant Squid Cover art for The Girl Who Drank the Moon Cover art for Grumpy Pants Cover art for The Hammer of Thor Cover art for Hare and the Tortoise Cover art for I Dissent Cover art for If I Was Your Girl Cover art for In Plain Sight Cover art for In the Shadow of Liberty Cover art for The Inquisitor's Tale Cover art for Labyrinth Lost Cover art for Leave Me Alone! Cover art for Maybe Something Beautiful Cover art for Oops, Pounce, Quick, Run! Cover art for The Passion of Dolssa Cover art for Pride Cover art for Rani Patel in Full Effect Cover art for Sachiko Cover art for Scythe Cover art for The Serpent King Cover art for The Sun is Also A Star Cover art for This Land is Out Land Cover art for Unbecoming Cover art for Uprooted Cover art for The Water Princess Cover art for We Will Not Be Silent Cover art for When We Collided Cover art for Wolf Hollow Cover art for Bringing the Outside In Cover art for A Poem for Peter Cover art for The Creepy Case Files of Margo Maloo Cover art for They All Saw A Cat

 


 
 

Bedtime Books

posted by: February 9, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Bedtime for YetiCover art for A Number SlumberCover art for Goodnight EveryonePut on your jammies, grab your favorite stuffed animal and snuggle up with these new picture books perfect for bedtime.

 

In Bedtime for Yeti by Vin Vogel, Yeti must put on a brave face at bedtime when he discovers that his favorite stuffed animal is missing. Where could his sidekick be? And is he in danger? Will little Yeti be brave enough to save the day?

 

Various anthropomorphic animals perform familiar bedtime rituals in A Number Slumber by Suzanne Bloom. Then the alliterative text counts down from 10 (terribly tired tigers) to one (really weary wombat). The pastel illustrations are soft and soothing and evocative of dreaming.

 

Goodnight Everyone by Chris Haughton features a simple and repetitive story, with everything from the quietest yawns from the smallest sleepy mice to the mighty yawns of Great Bear. The real pleasure, though, comes from the illustrations. The predominantly pink, purple and blue color palette gets darker as the pages turn and bedtime approaches. The inside cover offers a brief astronomy lesson with its depiction of the solar system and a map of the constellations featuring Ursa Minor and Ursa Major — the namesakes for the story’s Little Bear and Great Bear.  


 
 

Bedtime Stories for the Shore

posted by: August 8, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The StormCover art for MayaWhether you’ve just been down the ocean or you’re anticipating your next trip, here are three seaside bedtime stories to share with your kids — especially if they’re fans of Ponyo.

 

The protagonist of The Storm can’t wait to go to the beach tomorrow with his parents! But one of Japan’s infamous monsoons threatens to douse their plans. Can his family weather the storm through the night or will their plans be rained out? Akiko Miyakoshi’s masterful charcoal illustrations depict this story of anticipation and overcoming fear with the same finesse as fellow illustrators Chris Van Allsburg and Daniel Miyares.

 

Maya by Mahak Jain is having trouble sleeping as well. Troubled by the dark when the power goes out, her mother comforts her with the story of the first banyan tree. Through this story and her dreamy imaginings, Maya learns how to transform her fears and overcome the sadness plaguing her from a recent loss. Elly MacKay’s ethereal cut-paper diorama illustrations, reminiscent of Lotte Reiniger’s Adventures of Prince Achmed, set the perfect tone in their depiction of Maya’s dream world.

 

Finally, be lulled to sleep by Anne Hunter’s onomatopoetic depiction of animals’ lullabies in Cricket Song. As the sun sets across the ocean, two worlds comingle as the diurnal creatures settle into their beds and nocturnal creatures start to wake. This understated story captures a sense of the earth’s orbit, starting in a forest in the Pacific Northwest and ending on an island in the South Seas. The interchange of the animals across the world makes for a tranquil procession as the two children in the book (and your own) drift off into slumberland.

Liz

Liz

 
 

A Few Unbearably Entertaining Picture Books

posted by: May 2, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Shh! Bears SleepingCover art for A Beginner's Guide to Bear SpottingCover art for Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World's Most Famous BearAfter a long and snowy winter, springtime is here...and so are the bears! If you like your picture books entertaining and educational, be sure to check out these three new books.

 

Shh! Bears Sleeping written by David Martin with pictures by Steve Johnson and Lou Fancher opens with a mama bear and her two cubs awakening at the beginning of spring, and then follows the three American black bears through the year, all the way to the next winter when the bears again pile in their den to sleep. The oil painting illustrations depicting scenes throughout the four seasons are beautifully done, and readers will enjoy the short, fun rhyming text as well as the additional facts presented in a short section at the end.

 

In A Beginner’s Guide to Bear Spotting by Michelle Robinson and illustrated by David Roberts, the narrator guides you through a walk in the woods where you are lucky enough to encounter both a black bear and a brown bear. The narrator talks you through the encounter and explains a few differences between them. While the book is humorous, it is careful to let young readers know that the only bears you should snuggle are of the stuffed variety. The illustrations are gorgeous, quirky and sure to bring laughs.

 

Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear by Lindsay Mattick and illustrated by Sophie Blackall tells the fascinating story behind the namesake of Winnie-the-Pooh. In 1914, a veterinarian and solider named Captain Harry Colebourn bought a bear cub for $20 at a train station. The cub traveled across the Atlantic Ocean with the Second Canadian Infantry Brigade and became their mascot and companion as they trained in England. Named Winnipeg in honor of Colebourn’s hometown, the bear found a permanent home at the London Zoo when the soldiers shipped to France. Author Mattick is the great-granddaughter of Colebourn and frames the tale as a bedtime story to her young son, Cole. The story is fascinating, and the connection to A. A. Milne’s famous bear adds extra interest.


 
 

Punk Skunks

posted by: March 31, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Punk SkunksChances are you've never heard of the Punk Skunks. Despite their unique sound and emphasis on positive themes such as friendship, they remain largely ignored by the music industry, perhaps because they are skunks. But all of that’s about to change thanks to the new picture book Punk Skunks by the husband and wife team of Trisha Speed Shaskan and Stephen Shaskan.

 

Kit and Buzz were two BSFs (best skunks forever) who loved skateboarding, riding bikes, spray painting (literally spraying smelly pictures with their tails) and hanging out at their favorite club, ABCDs. But what they liked to do most of all was rock out. They bonded over their love of great punk bands such as the Ratmoans, the DescendAnts and Shrewsie Shrew, and gained a cult following thanks to their catchy songs “We’re Buzz and Kit” and “BSF.” But all of that was about to change.

 

One day while jamming at their practice space, the two musical geniuses clashed. Kit wanted to sing a song about skating and Buzz wanted to sing a song about painting. The creative differences were irreconcilable, and the Punk Skunks were no more. But was this really the end? Will this dynamic duo go the way of Lennon and McCartney, Jones and Strummer, Adam and his Ants? You’ll have to read to find out!

 

Even if you aren’t familiar with the Punk Skunks, this playful homage to the days of Chuck Taylors and safety pins has enough charm to make superfans of even the most jaded punks. And you can get to know these creative critters even better through this article at The Little Crooked Cottage where they were recently interviewed by a pig.


 
 

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