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You Have to Say Every Word โ€“ No Matter What

Cover of The Book with No Pictures by B.J. Novak Sample pages from The Book With No Pictures by B.J. NovakA picture book with no pictures? Leave it to Emmy Award winning actor B.J. Novak to create just that with his innovative and interactive The Book with No Pictures. Sure to be a repeat story time request, this is one that parents won’t tire of either.

 

There is one rule when reading this gem that begs to be read aloud – everything written on the page has to be spoken out loud by the reader. The reader may be compelled to sing or even scream as the words could be a zany song about eating ants for breakfast or just a list of splendiferously ridiculous sounds like Fa-rumpa-jumpa and BA-DONGY FACE!!!!!!

 

A white background carries the varied font types, sizes and colors which are expertly employed to emphasize a change in tone and voice for the reader of this story. Novak also creatively breaks the fourth wall with direct address allowing for interaction as the reader beseeches the listener to let him stop throughout and  even at the end begs, "please please please please please choose a book with pictures." Novak, whose author picture is appropriately a verbal description, is a beloved and talented comedian who has achieved great success making grown-ups laugh and has now charmed a whole new audience who won’t  stop giggling. Find out for yourself by watching this YouTube clip of Novak’s delightful reading in front of a roomful of laughing children.

Maureen

 
 

Ye Gods!

Ye Gods!

posted by:
October 28, 2014 - 7:00am

Percy Jackson's Greek GodsSo you raced through the Percy Jackson series by Rick Riordan, all the way from The Lightning Thief through The Last Olympian. Then you settled into the Heroes of Olympus series, flying through those tomes like Hermes fleeing Typhon. Now you’re just waiting around for your copy of The Blood of Olympus to hit the hold shelf and your journey through all things Greek and godly will be complete.

 

Probably think you’re an expert on Greek mythology by now, right?

 

Think again.

 

Sure, you know all about Zeus, Athena, Poseidon; all the poster children of Greek legend and lore. And by now you’ve gotten a handle on what it means to be a demigod. But how about Minthe or Metis? Thetis or Themis? Ring any bells? Face it, when it comes to real expertise, you’ve got a ways to go. Fortunately, Professor Percy Jackson has got your back.

 

Here to guide you through the chaotic origins of Greek mythology, including nymphs, lesser gods, heroes and upstart mortals of latter days, Percy Jackson’s Greek Gods covers it all.

 

Not in some boring lecture-style either. Nah, Percy wouldn’t have the attention span for it, and you don’t have TIME for that right now anyway! You’re about to embark on the very last book in the Heroes of Olympus series for Pan’s sake! Percy knows that and doesn’t want to shake your focus.

 

But seriously, at a time like this, do you REALLY want to face Gaea without a complete working knowledge of the whole Greek godly shebang? When you’re in the thick of battle, you don’t want any multi-headed, poison-dripping surprises. So while you’re waiting for The Blood of Olympus, do yourself a favor and brush up on your myth know-how. You’ll be glad you did.

Meghan

 
 

Quoth the Big Bird

Quoth the Big Bird

posted by:
October 21, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Happy Halloween!Cover art for The Ghosts Go HauntingCover art for At the Old Haunted HouseIt’s October, and that means it’s time to carve the pumpkins, get out the spooky decorations and get the candy ready for the trick-or-treaters. It’s also a time for great Halloween-themed picture books! Stories that feature our television friends are always popular with the kids, but Sesame Street: Happy Halloween!, written by Lillian Jaine and brightly illustrated by Ernie Kwiat, has an added treat for grown-ups. One by one, Elmo, Big Bird and the rest of the monsters from Sesame Street rap upon the Count’s castle door to visit him on Halloween. After all ten of the friends arrive, they hear another tap, tap, tapping. “Deep into that darkness peering, long they stood there wondering, fearing.” Who could it be? With literary elements from Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Raven,” the lilting cadence of the text makes this a great story to read with your kids and discover the identity of the final guest coming to join in the spooky fun!
 

If your children enjoy songs as well as stories, then there are two great new picture books by Helen Ketteman to share! The Ghosts Go Haunting lends itself to be sung to the tune of “The Ants Go Marching.” At M.T. Tombs Elementary, things are getting a bit spooky as the ghosts go haunting one by one, black cats go hissing six by six and even the zombies are stumbling ten by ten looking for brains all over the school! With green faced witches and big eared goblins, Adam Records pictures are lively and fun. Ketteman’s other sing-along Halloween story is At the Old Haunted House, with darkly delightful illustrations by Nate Wragg. Anyone familiar with the children’s song “Over in the Meadow,” may find themselves singing the text of this story to your wee witchy one.

Christina

 
 

Sibling Storytime - A Reasonable Compromise

Cover art for Jack and JillCover art for Hickory, Dickory, DockCover art for Humpty DumptyWe library-goers are in the know: Reading to your little ones from an early age can provide an early literacy boost. And the earlier you start, the bigger the boost! Of course, for parents of more than one young child, the two or three year gulf separating bouncing baby from precocious tot can complicate communal story times. Baby has a penchant for crumpling pages in picture books. Your toddler is easily bored by the simple words and lack of plot typical of board books.

 

Enter Charles Reasoner.

 

This veteran author/illustrator features indestructible reads which are nevertheless engaging for older siblings. Bright, full-color images and sturdy board pages will hold a baby’s attention, while die-cut pages and rhyming text will keep older siblings amused. Eschewing the traditional rectangular shape, Reasoner’s playful curvilinear pages combine to mimic a three-dimensional picture, inviting young readers to enter the book and explore its interior scenes in greater detail. Beyond the colorful images and rhymes, Reasoner’s books also boast some surprisingly subtle touches, such as background character comments and seek-and-find opportunities for older children.

 

Reasoner is the author and/or illustrator of over 200 works, but the following series are particularly well-suited to bridging the young sibling story time age gap: Nursery Rhymes, Holiday Books and Peek-a-Boo!. Be sure to check out the newest titles to hit your library shelves this fall, including Humpty Dumpty, Hickory Dickory Dock and Jack and Jill, as well as fresh holiday favorites: Peek-a-Boo Elves, Peek-a-Boo Reindeer, and Peek-a-Boo Snowman.

Meghan

 
 

Believe in the Possible!

Believe in the Possible!

posted by:
October 16, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Fourteenth GoldfishMeet 11-year-old Ellie. She feels like something of a misfit in her artistic family. Her theater director mother and actor father wonder why she doesn’t have the theater gene, and Ellie worries that she’ll never find her passion in life. Adding to her loneliness, she misses elementary school and her best friend Brianna, who suddenly doesn’t seem to realize she’s even alive. Things aren’t going great for Ellie, and then Melvin appears.

 

Melvin is 13, grouchy and likes to wear old man’s clothes. He only wants to eat Chinese food. He argues with Ellie’s mom about the man she’s dating. He is forced to go to Ellie’s school and he gets detention for yelling about science. In fact, he sounds suspiciously like her scientist grandfather, but how could it be possible?

 

Through Melvin, Ellie discovers her hidden passion all along: science. She learns about famous scientists like Salk, Oppenheimer, Curie and Pasteur. She goes on madcap adventures and failed heists. She asks some difficult questions: are all scientific discoveries good for everyone? What happens if they’re not?

 

Written by three-time Newbery Honor-winning author Jennifer L. Holm, The Fourteenth Goldfish is making itself known on the Newbery Medal blogs as a front-runner for the prize in January. Told with heart, humor and mischief, this is a must-read for all young scientists starting to discover the world on their own and for the adults who want to cultivate the wonder of lifelong learning. It teaches us not to just believe in the impossible, but to believe in the possible!

Jessica

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Heroes Needed, Never Deserved

Heroes Needed, Never Deserved

posted by:
October 6, 2014 - 8:34am

Cover art for The Luck UgliesIn years past, whenever the tiny fishing village of Drowning was in dire straits, unlikely heroes would skulk from its darkest corners to lend their dexterous yet reluctant hands. These mysterious "Luck Uglies" used to be revered among the villagers as masters of skullduggery and subterfuge, but after an order from "The Great" Earl Longchance, the former peoples' champions became fugitives overnight. In The Luck Uglies, much time has elapsed since the Uglies' presence in Drowning; so much so, that they're presently regarded as little more than tall tales.
 

Riley and her best friends Folly and Quinn read all about the fabled Luck Uglies in a book they pilfer from a poet in town. The book is filled with all sorts of hearsay about Drowning and its surrounding territories, including the foreboding forest known as "Beyond the Shale" and the bogs known as, well, "The Bogs." The Bogs are said to be inhabited by a nasty group of creatures known as Bog Noblins — think hobgoblins, but way meaner and even way uglier. Bog Noblins haven't been seen around Drowning since even before the Uglies disappeared. Imagine everyone's surprise when one emerges from The Bogs and trundles into town!
 

The adventurous trio has so many questions. Where'd the Bog Noblin come from? Wait, we know that: The Bogs. But why, after all this time, did it suddenly show up? And have the nights seemed darker lately? And why have the rooks and ravens recently taken to roosting at the Dead Fish Inn? And wait, wasn't that gargoyle atop a different building yesterday?
 

Paul Durham's The Luck Uglies is the first book in a planned series with great potential. With a vibrant, fanciful world teeming with creatures to discover and adventures to be had, Riley, Folly and Quinn are given chances to become true heroes — not the kind that have to hide in the sewers to avoid the Earl.

Tom

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Myth or Monster

Myth or Monster

posted by:
September 11, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Yeti FilesThe legends of Bigfoot and his cryptid relatives (Yeti, Chupacabra, etc.) have been around for centuries, but author/illustrator Kevin Sherry has put a new spin on this old standard. In The Yeti Files #1: Meet the Bigfeet, Sherry tells the story from a Yeti’s point of view. Told in semi-graphic novel style with lots of illustrations, the reader is introduced to Blizz Richards, the Yeti narrator, and many of his friends and relatives. After receiving an invitation to a Bigfeet family reunion, Blizz relates how such reunions used to be held annually until his cousin Brian broke the code of the cryptid community and vanished forever.
 

Filled with silly humor, the story follows the plight of Blizz and his helpers — a goblin, an elf and an Arctic fox — as they try to find Brian and thwart the attempts of an evil cryptozoologist who wants to expose the cryptids to the world! While elementary aged children will undoubtedly enjoy the illustrations and offbeat story, Sherry has put enough subtle details in his drawings to entertain older readers too. The vocabulary can be a bit daunting, but Sherry does explain some of the more difficult terms (for example, cryptid is “a hidden animal whose existence has never been proven”). The first book in a new series, the story ends with a teaser for the next installment which may involve the Loch Ness Monster!

 

Kevin Sherry is a local Baltimore author who also founded Squidfire.com, an online t-shirt business.

Regina

 
 

Flesh and Blood

Flesh and Blood

posted by:
August 29, 2014 - 8:00am

SistersAt turns hilarious and poignant, Sisters marks Raina Telgemeier’s latest autobiographical graphic novel reminiscence of her childhood and adolescence. This family story is a companion of sorts to her earlier Eisner Award-winning Smile. The events of a fateful summer of her early adolescence are clearly depicted in episodic arcs which show the early days of two young artists. As the book opens, Raina, her younger sister Amara, and little brother Will are packing camping supplies with their mom as they travel from San Francisco to a family reunion in Colorado. This road trip doesn’t go quite as planned, of course, and the journey plainly displays a long-seething sibling rivalry between the two girls. In flashbacks, Raina’s initial desire for a baby sister quickly turns sour when Amara’s personality doesn’t match Raina’s expectations.

 

And there are other issues at play here as well – Raina’s father has been laid off from his job, and her parents’ relationship suffers because of it. A string of ill-conceived pet adoptions, culminating in a snake escape, adds another wrinkle of tension among the family members. But the concerns are limited compared to the amusing situations Raina finds herself in. Telgemeier’s signature vibrant line-drawings are deceptively simple, and her characters are portrayed with expressive detail. The full-color illustrations make for an appealing package which is easy to follow, given the non-linear chronology. Readers can easily empathize with the Telgemeier family and their frustrations and triumphs. Sisters is a quick, pleasurable read, and the book will become a sure-bet for siblings dealing with conflict.

Todd

 
 

Off to School We Go

Off to School We Go

posted by:
August 19, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for EddaCover art for Monsters Love SchoolAs summer draws to an end, it’s time to start getting the little ones ready for school. This new adventure can be a little scary for kids. What will they do at school? Will they make any friends? Will their teacher be nice? Help your child prepare for the first day of school with these new picture books.
 

Being the littlest Valkyrie in Asgard is a lot of fun, but sometimes Edda wonders what it would be like to be with kids her own age. Fortunately, Edda’s papa knows just what to do in Edda: A Little Valkyrie’s First Day of School, written and illustrated by Adam Auerbach. Flying down to earth for her first day of school, Edda is worried. She’s never been away from Asgard and isn’t sure that she will fit in. Things are a lot different at school on earth than they are in Asgard, but Edda is brave and, through a writing assignment, soon makes some new friends. Auerbach’s simple pen and ink illustrations have been digitally colored and help tell this mythology-meets-real-life story.
 

Monsters love adventures, but with summer coming to an end, Blue must prepare to go on his biggest adventure of all in Monsters Love School, written and illustrated by Mike Austin. With the help of his monster friends, Blue makes sure he has all the supplies needed to start school. But why does he have to go to school? “I already know my ABGs and 413s and XYDs!” says Blue. Children will be able to relate to Blue’s worries and cheer him on as he experiences all the wonders of his first day at school. Digitally enhanced illustrations with monsters reminiscent of Monsters Inc., Austin’s book is sure to please your little monster.

Christina

 
 

Growing Up with WondLa

Growing Up with WondLa

posted by:
August 5, 2014 - 8:00am

The Battle for WondLaWhat is WondLa? When Eva Nine left home in the first book of the WondLa trilogy by Tony DiTerlizzi, all she had was her robotic Muthr and a picture of a place called WondLa, a land that seemed to offer everything she ever wanted out of life. A lot has changed since then. She's made friends, she's made a few enemies and she's discovered that the world has changed from what she was trained to face. The entire Earth had gone dormant until a life generator tried to make the planet livable again for alien colonists. Eva Nine has discovered that she's not the last human in the world, but what's left of humanity is being pushed into a war that doesn't need to be fought. The time has come for The Battle for WondLa.

 

This is a great series to grow up with. There's action, adventure, even a little romance, but there's also some pretty hefty philosophical concepts so the book is not age-locked. Alien — and not-so-alien but still bizarre — beasts live and die and figure out what they stand for. Tony DiTerlizzi was also one of the writers and illustrators for the Spiderwick Chronicles, and just as he did with those books, the WondLa trilogy overflows with inventive and monochrome character-filled illustrations. It's possible to get a sense of who the characters are and what they'll do just by looking at them.

 

This might not be an appropriate read for very young children. Violence abounds and terrifying situations are common, but that's part of growing up. Scary story elements are right next to affirmations of friendship, fascinating world building and the essential idea that all people see things differently. This may be a children's book, but readers of any age should be able to enjoy this one.

Matt