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Zombie Aftermath

Zombie Aftermath

posted by:
December 28, 2012 - 8:50am

HomeHome by Matthew Costello follows a mother and her two children as they make their way back to New York City in a hostile post-apocalyptic environment. Tragic events preceding this novel have forced Christie Murphy and her two children to flee a family vacation camp and head out into the unknown. Creatures known as Can Heads are roaming in mobs, killing and eating anything or anyone that gets in their way. Christie needs to usher her children past several small towns that could possibly have a mob mentality and try to make it to the safety of a fenced and protected highway.   They must face check points for entry, and their lack of any identification could hinder their progress. Without any active radio broadcasts, they cannot be sure that things are still the same in New York. Their home and neighborhood could have been overrun with horrible, hungry, feral cannibals. Will their home still be safe and protected or will they need to formulate a plan that could take them to another destination?

 

Readers who love a chilling, horror tale will really enjoy Costello’s writing style.  He is good at terse suspense, and his use of shorter chapters and many action sequences keep the novel fresh and exciting. He creates an interesting zombie-like villain without trying to recreate actual zombie lore, and this makes Home a thrilling read. The novel Home picks up after the events in his earlier novel, Vacation. Fans of The Walking Dead will really devour this novel.

Doug

 
 

Dogs, Cats, and Facts

Paw Prints in the MoonlightI Want to Kill the DogWeirdopediaGood things come in small packages this time of year, as this delightful trio of recently published stocking stuffer-sized books demonstrates. From pondering the idiosyncrasies of domestic life with man's best friend (dog or cat) to a quirky collection of curious tidbits about our world, here are some lighthearted, quick reads to enjoy or give.

 

Feline lovers will cheer for Toby Jug, the enterprising black and white kitten in Denis O'Connor's  Paw Prints in the Moonlight: the Heartwarming True Story of One Man and His Cat. Set in rural Northumberland, O'Connor rescues the badly injured kitten one snowy night and brings it back to his 18th century cottage, where he keeps the kitten in a large cotton ball-cushioned pitcher. The kindhearted nature lover and his Maine Coon form an inseparable bond through many of Toby Jug's escapades. Lovely descriptions of the English countryside and delicate color illustrations enrich this poignant and charming tale for young and old.

 

Unfortunately, it’s not all domestic bliss for Richard Cohen when the family pet gets in the way. His new book, I Want to Kill the Dog, chronicles in jest the master-versus-canine tug of war. The author is married to television journalist Meredith Vieira, definitely the animal lover of this long married couple. Jasper is the “dog of many flavors," whose many annoying habits (ear splitting bark, for one) threaten marital harmony. Pet peeves aside, Cohen’s story belies what is really important: marriage and family come with good and bad and even the dog.

 

A potpourri of trivia awaits readers of Alex Palmer's Weird-o-pedia: the Ultimate Book of Surprising, Strange, and Incredibly Bizarre Facts about (Supposedly) Ordinary Things. For instance, did you know that mosquitoes prefer people with Type O blood, or that humming is good for your sinuses? In 12 humorous chapters, each containing alphabetized entries, Palmer focuses on food and drink, friends and family, work, play, and so forth. A useful list of sources is also included. Parents beware, though; some mature topics are presented. 

 

Cynthia

 
 

A Man Called Hitch

HitchcockAudiences continue to be fascinated by the life and work of legendary filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock. He is the subject of the new theatrical film based on Stephen Rebello’s Hitchcock!: Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho. Rebello begins with the story of Ed Gein, whose grisly crimes inspired Robert Bloch to write the novel Psycho. Hitchcock’s selection of Bloch’s gruesome novel was an abrupt departure from the expected, eliciting doubt from everyone including the studio. When Paramount made it clear that they wouldn’t back Psycho, Hitchcock offered to finance the movie himself if Paramount would distribute the finished product. Rebello pulls together details about the production of the film and explores the public reaction after its record-breaking openings in Boston, Philadelphia, and Chicago in June 1960. Hitchcock, starring Sir Anthony Hopkins and Dame Helen Mirren, brings to life Hitchcock’s relationship with his wife Alma and their collaboration during the production of Psycho.

 

Audiences looking for more Hitchcock will also want to see HBO’s The Girl. The film focuses largely on Hitchcock’s dark and often abusive relationship with Tippi Hedren, leading lady in his iconic films The Birds and Marnie. Hitchcock and Hedren, played by Toby Jones and Sienna Miller, create unforgettable films together but at a steep price to Hedren’s well-being.

 

Beth

 
 

Keep Calm and Carry On

Keep Calm and Carry On

posted by:
December 21, 2012 - 9:15am

God Save the QueenIn Kate Locke’s God Save the Queen, the Plague has infected the Aristocracy with something called the Prometheus Protein, which led to vampirism in England and lycanthropy in Scotland. Queen Victoria, a vampire, is about to celebrate 175 years on the throne. British society is now a strange blend of Victorian and modern, and the social ranks are comprised of the infected Aristocracy, Halvies (the half-blood offspring of the Aristocracy), and humans. They all coexist, but animosity between humans and the infected is high.

 

Xandra Vardan, a member of the Royal Guard, is a halvie; her mother was a human courtesan, and her father is an Aristo vampire. Shortly after Xandra’s half-sister Dede disappeared, her family was told that Dede committed suicide, but Xandra has good reason to believe that the corpse provided for her family to identify is not her sister. Xandra’s search for Dede leads her to the goblins’ underground kingdom and to Bedlam where she learns about dark secrets that someone would kill to keep hidden. She soon realizes that everyone she trusts may be part of a conspiracy, and her blood could be key to it all. With the help of Vex MacLaughlin, the sexy Alpha of the UK wolves, and an unlikely cast of outsiders, Xandra must navigate the secrets and lies that could bring down the British Empire.

 

Locke’s unique blend of alternate history, urban fantasy, romance, and steampunk will appeal to readers who enjoyed Gail Carriger’s Parasol Protectorate series. Xandra is a tough, smart heroine, and the story reads like the script of an action movie. The Queen is Dead, the next book in Locke’s Immortal Empire series, will be published in February 2013.

 

Beth

 
 

Secrets, Politics and Life in the โ€˜70s

You are the Love of My LifeUnrelated secrets simultaneously surface, threatening to destroy a family, a neighborhood and a country in Susan Richards Shreve’s latest novel, You Are the Love of My Life. A community on the outskirts of Washington, DC is the perfect backdrop for this story set in 1973, just as Watergate is ready to engulf the capital and the nation. In this seemingly tranquil neighborhood, Lucy Painter grew up in a family drowning in secrecy. Her father, an advisor to Harry Truman, committed suicide due to “the information he kept”. Her mother changed their last name and moved them across the country for a fresh start, but these actions only served to catapult Lucy towards an adult life equally full of secrecy and lies. When Lucy moves with her two children back to her childhood home, she hopes for a life of anonymity. But intrusive neighbors, especially fellow mother Zelda who has been hiding a dysfunctional marriage, threaten the protective shell she’s built around her life. When Lucy’s daughter Maggie becomes entranced with Zelda and further isolates herself, Lucy realizes she must lay bare her past in order to move forward in her own life and rescue her daughter.

 

Shreve does an excellent job creating nuanced characters who don’t reveal all their cards. In addition to Lucy and Zelda there is August, a former professor who’s widowed and struggling with professional shortcomings, Lane, who is coping with the then-shame of breast cancer treatment, and Adam, Zelda’s husband and Vietnam veteran who is silently suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Shreve’s novel highlights a time in American history when normalcy and conformity battled with larger social issues and political blunders too big to ignore, a time when underlying tensions came to a roiling boil.

 

Melanie

 
 

You Are What You Eat With

You Are What You Eat With

posted by:
December 20, 2012 - 9:15am

Consider the ForkWhat do frying pans, spit-jacks, and molecular gastronomy have in common? They are all kitchen technologies that have affected how humans accomplish the very basic task of feeding themselves. Some are ancient, like the wooden spoon, which has been around for thousands of years. Some are complex, like the SousVide SVK-00001 Supreme Water Oven, which can hold a vacuum-sealed package of chicken breast at a constant temperature of 137 degrees Fahrenheit until the meat becomes succulent, juicy, and somehow safe enough to eat. And some, like the basic cooking pot, are more influential than others. They all have a place in Bee Wilson’s insightful and entertaining new history, Consider the Fork: A history of how we cook and eat

 

In a work that spans time from before the development of agriculture through today’s high-tech kitchen gadgetry, it is impossible to be comprehensive. Wilson, instead, focuses on certain culinary implements that have had an impact on what we eat and how we go about preparing to eat it. Each chapter explores a different kitchen tool or concept, with charming hand-drawn illustrations of the various equipment sprinkled throughout the text. Wilson also includes short spotlights on particularly useful, unique, and interesting examples of kitchen technology that punctuate the end of the every chapter. 

 

Witty and filled with wonderful obscure facts about famous and long-forgotten kitchen equipment, Consider the Fork is perfect for anyone who has ever looked in their kitchen drawers and wondered, “Where did all this stuff come from?” Food history enthusiasts and fans of Mark Kurlansky’s Salt: A world history will devour this delightful read.

 

Rachael

 
 

Outside Looking In

Brain on FireAs Susannah Cahalan waited in the doctor’s office the painting of Miro’s Carota, with its twisted, unnatural grin, seemed to smile down at her. She would revisit the colorful and distorted face over the next several months as she battled a mysterious neurological illness that almost permanently severed her connection with reality. In her candid and gripping new memoir, Brain on Fire: My Month of Madness, the New York Post reporter reconstructs in a riveting fashion the journey that carried her to the brink of lunacy.

 

For twenty-four-year-old Cahalan the illness crept up innocently enough. She believed her flu symptoms were the result of bedbugs in her Manhattan apartment. Once she began experiencing numbness she sought out a doctor. Soon she was missing deadlines at work, and her increasingly erratic behavior now included paranoia and hallucinations. Cahalan and her family worried she was having a nervous breakdown. It was her first blackout at her boyfriend Stephen’s house that “marked the line between sanity and insanity,” she recalled. Doctors were baffled, and on March 23, 2009 she was admitted to the hospital. Eventually, a prominent neurologist's hunch followed by a brain biopsy confirmed that she suffered from rare autoimmune encephalitis. Recovery would take months. Her zombie-like behavior scared people who wondered what was wrong with her. She described running into an old high school friend as a "soul crushing moment." Her rock remained her family, Stephen and her parents, who never wavered.

 

Cahalan admits writing her story was difficult. With only flashes of memory intact she relied on interviews, medical records, journals, and hospital video footage to complete the picture. Absorbing and fast paced, the book’s short chapters read like a medical mystery that takes an eye-opening look inside the misfiring of the human mind and its ability to repair and emerge from the abyss.

 

Cynthia

 
 

Natty Boh and Pitchers from the Sunpapers

Baltimore BeerDays RememberedBaltimore CountyCare for a stroll down memory lane? How about a local history lesson? Check out this trio of books focusing on Bawlmer and its ‘burbs. Baltimore Beer: A Satisfying History of Charm City Brewing joins Days Remembered: Iconic Photography of the Baltimore Sun and Baltimore County: Historical Reflections and Favorite Scenes in a remembrance of things past.

 

Local author, former Sun food columnist, and founder of Baltimore Beer Week, Rob Kasper knows his food and drink. In Baltimore Beer, he traces the growth of the brewing industry beginning with the influence of the German immigrants who brought their craft with them from Europe. Loaded with anecdotes and moving from early biergartens to modern brewpubs, Kasper explores the breweries’ social and economic influence on the Baltimore area. “Ain’t the beer cold?”

 

Baltimore residents Barton and Elizabeth Cockey teamed up to produce a charming look at ye olde suburbia in their book Baltimore County. Divided into sections such as Transportation, Public Buildings and Schools, and Wars, this book takes the reader on a tour of county peoples and places and offers an informative narrative laced with personal recollections. Instead of photographs, the book is illustrated with artist Elizabeth’s paintings of the area.

 

2012 marked the 175th year anniversary of the Baltimore Sun. While no longer a “penny paper,” the power of its photographs to inform and inspire remains a constant. Days Remembered is a collection of images from the Sun spanning from the 1901 debut portrait photograph of Judge Sherry of the Maryland Court of Appeals to the Blue Angels flight over Fort McHenry this past summer. Grouped by decade and including pictures of Babe Ruth, marble step-scrubbing, Blaze Starr, the Berrigan brothers, and the integration of Southern High, this visual history perfectly captures the past one hundred-plus years of Maryland living.

 

Lori

 
 

Meet Jack Reacher

Meet Jack Reacher

posted by:
December 17, 2012 - 8:45am

Jack Reacher's RulesOne Shot, the ninth book in Lee Child’s bestselling Reacher series, has been adapted for the big screen in a new film called Jack Reacher. A sniper fires six shots into a crowd, leaving five people dead. The prime suspect, a former Gulf War sniper named James Barr, insists that he’s innocent and says, “Get Jack Reacher for me.” Reacher, a larger-than-life ex-military investigator, appears on the scene and concludes that Barr isn’t the shooter. Reacher teams up with a young lawyer to find the truth and uncover the puppet-master behind it all. With its pulse-pounding suspense, it is no surprise that One Shot was destined for the big screen. New fans and long-standing Reacher Creatures (a moniker for Child’s fans) will also want to check out Jack Reacher’s Rules, a new compendium of trivia, quotations, and advice. This definitive guide to all things Reacher is a fun treat for fans and a great way to get to know the world of Jack Reacher.

 

The filmmakers’ decision to cast Tom Cruise as the 6'5" Jack Reacher was widely criticized by fans of the series. In a recent interview, Child said, “It’s not just about the size. Reacher is also very smart. He’s very intimidating. He’s the coolest guy in the room, and Cruise can do that. On the screen, he nails it.” Can Tom Cruise fill Reacher’s shoes? Decide for yourself! The trailer is available now, and Jack Reacher will be in theaters on December 21.

Beth

 
 

Girls Gone Wild

Girls Gone Wild

posted by:
December 14, 2012 - 9:35am

Wild GirlsKate Riordan, the teenage heroine of Wild Girls by Mary Stewart Atwell, has lived in the depressed, left-behind Appalachian river town of Swan River all her life. Swan River is just not the kind of town that people leave - and there's nothing particularly sinister about that, it's only that Swan River's falling-down shacks, meager businesses, and dark wooded roads inspire little ambition. Kate fears this. She has an older sister, Maggie, whose intelligence and talent might have propelled her out of Swan River for good, but instead Maggie works at the coffee shop and drinks wine coolers in the Tastee Freez parking lot with her girlfriends. And there is something else that Kate fears. Sometimes, in Swan River, a teenage girl will suddenly go wild for a night. Full of furious supernatural power, she may destroy lives and property. Even Maggie had a wild night once, during which she flew out a window and torched the library. Kate’s salvation, if she can avoid falling victim to Swan River’s twin perils of rage and inertia, is her education. Thanks to her mother's job as secretary to the headmaster, Kate attends an exclusive private boarding school called the Academy – although the Academy is not without its own perils.

 

Prose as sharp and pungent as a red autumn leaf describes Kate's vertiginous passage through her senior year at the Academy. And while Wild Girls touches on a number of themes that have become popular recently - boarding school, magical realism, mean girls - it never feels formulaic. Wild Girls is a great read for teenage girls and grownup girls alike.

Paula W.