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God Help the Child

posted by: July 20, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for God Help the ChildFans of Toni Morrison will find the new and not-so-new in her latest novel, God Help the Child. The new: This is Morrison's first book to be set in present day instead of the historical past. The not-so-new are the issues Morrison is known for tackling, such as sexual abuse, betrayal and race perceptions. Each is accounted for in this slim, spare novel about the ways in which people revive themselves from life's early trauma and rejection.

 

This story of a mother and her daughter stares down a heartrending path, punctuated by cruelty and denial. Sweetness, the mother, is a light-skinned African-American woman who is repulsed by the midnight blackness of her own daughter, Lula Ann. “She was so black she scared me,” says Sweetness, who calls herself “high yellow.” For Lula Ann, growing up with a distant mother meant that she would do just about anything to gain her attention, including telling a devastating lie that will haunt her. As an adult, Lula Ann changes her name to Bride. Successful, with a soon-to-be-launched cosmetic line, the stunningly beautiful young woman embraces her fashionable blue-blackness, dressing in accentuating white. She falls apart when her lover leaves her. Her search for him leads to more discoveries about herself and the man she may not know at all.
 
Told from shifting points-of-view, God Help the Child exudes characteristic Morrison prose with its powerful imagery and subtle emotional probing. There is also a bow to the author's canon of previous works, including a spell of magical realism that readers may recognize. The first African-American woman to win the Nobel Prize in literature, Morrison is widely considered one of the world’s superb storytellers. And while the length of her novels may be shortening (this is her 11th and one of the leanest at 178 pages), the 84-year-old continues to mine the black American experience for lessons from the past. In her latest work, a breach of trust in childhood becomes the conduit that shapes all that comes later, making forgiveness and reconciliation necessary but daunting.

 


 
 

Behind the Big Screen

posted by: July 17, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for We Don't Need RoadsCover art for As If!

In 1985, the first Back to the Future movie was released and was an instant blockbuster. Two sequels followed and the trilogy remains popular. Ten years later, Amy Heckerling’s Clueless, a modern retelling of Jane Austen’s Emma, was released and became a touchstone for a generation. Two new books go behind the scenes of these seminal movies and offer gossipy tidbits, interviews, photographs and more.

 

We Don’t Need Roads: The Making of the Back to the Future Trilogy by Caseen Gaines explores the time-travelling vehicle which brought us Marty McFly and catapulted Michael J. Fox to superstardom. More than 50 original interviews were conducted with key players, including director Robert Zemeckis, Christopher Lloyd, Lea Thompson and Huey Lewis. Gaines shares insider information about the movie, including details of the recasting of Eric Stoltz and the resulting domino effect, but he also looks at the staying power and devoted fan base of these three inventive films.

 

As If!: The Oral History of Clueless As Told by Amy Heckerling and the Cast and Crew by Jen Chaney delivers on its title’s promise with an in-depth account of this innovative movie told by the people who were there. Chaney’s interviews garnered information about casting, costume design, soundtrack and setting, all of which were so vital to the film’s message and success. It appears that this Beverly Hills comedy of manners holds up after 20 years as it remains one of today’s most streamed movies. Chaney includes never-before-seen photos, original call sheets and casting notes, along with ideas as to why the movie continues to have such a powerful pop culture presence. Think you’ll find a more fun summer read? As Alicia Silverstone’s Cher would say: As if!


 
 

Early Warning

posted by: July 15, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Early WarningJane Smiley continues the saga of the Langdon family with Early Warning, the second installment in her trilogy. Picking up the story from where it left off at the end of Some Luck, Early Warning begins in 1953. We follow the second generation through the Cold War, the assassinations of the Kennedys and Dr. King and wars across the planet. Mothers raise their children according to Dr. Spock and Penelope Leach. Fathers take jobs that make their fortunes and bend their principles. Through the social unrest of the campuses, the shifting political tides, the Jonestown Massacre and Watergate there is one constancy — the family.  

 

Only one child of Matthew and Roseanna Langdon will choose to stay on the farm. The siblings roam the country — in some cases the world — and settle in locations from Maryland to California. The Langdons are prolific, but fortunately Smiley provides a family tree in case we get lost. Indeed, some of the characters lose themselves along the way, only to find themselves in unexpected ways. Through it all, we find ourselves sharing the joy and heartache as each Langdon child negotiates the perils of adulthood and defines their own family. Despite the foibles of the world, it is ultimately the daily challenges that affect our lives the most.  

 

Each chapter depicts a year of the characters’ lives. Smiley, who won the Pulitzer Prize for A Thousand Acres, is a master at weaving a tale through large historical events while never losing the minutia of daily life. In Early Warning, she chronicles the story of America through the lens of 19 characters while staying true to the story and their personalities.

 


 
 

The Third Wife

posted by: July 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Third Wife by Lisa JewellLisa Jewell’s riveting family drama The Third Wife unravels the layers of a seemingly cohesive blended family to reveal emotional scars and disquieting truths, all while delivering an authentic tale complete with love, loss and renewal. Jojo Moyes raves that this remarkable new novel is “Clever, intelligent . . . wonderful.”

 

At 48, Adrian Wolfe’s life is ideal. He is married to the much younger Maya who is perfectly at home in his world which consists of two ex-wives and five children. Maya’s calm spirit and amenable attitude mask a different reality which comes to a head when she can’t cope any more, gets plastered and is killed when she steps in front of a bus. Circumstances indicate that it was just a tragic accident, but a string of events a year after her death prompt Adrian to investigate what really happened.

 

First, Jane, an attractive stranger, begins appearing wherever Adrian and his family are. Then a series of vitriolic emails directed to Maya are unearthed and Adrian vows to uncover what really happened to his wife. As he uncovers more facts, he tries to avoid the real truth that his marriage was not a happy one and his family is not perfect. Jewell successfully manages to present multiple perspectives, including Maya’s, which allows the reader to see the other side of the Wolfe family, the unpleasant reality which Adrian ignored in an effort to make himself feel at peace with his abandonments. The characters are sharply written and the quick pace will keep you turning the page as revelations from the past affect the present all while creating an honest portrayal of a real modern family.


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Go Set a Watchman

posted by: July 10, 2015 - 10:00am

Cover art for Go Set a Watchman

Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, set for publication on July 14, is one of the most anticipated books in recent memory. Publisher Harper Collins has said that pre-orders for this novel are the highest in company history. The book has been closely guarded, but now a few details are being revealed with both The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian previewing the first chapter available here. If you want to get a taste of Reese Witherspoon’s narration of the audio book, here’s a sneak listen to the first chapter.

 

Lee’s second novel takes place in the 1950s, 20 years after her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, and opens with Scout returning by train to Maycomb, Alabama. Lee has said the novel did not undergo any revisions since she completed the manuscript in the 1950s and is “humbled and amazed that this will now be published after all these years.”

 

Learn more about this big event, including a preview of PBS’ Thirteen Days of Harper Lee, on BCPL’s Tumblr, and be sure to check back for a Between the Covers post about the novel soon!


 
 

Thin Air

posted by: July 10, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Thin Air by Ann CleevesUniversity chums meet to celebrate the wedding of one of their friends in Ann Cleeves’ Thin Air. Lowrie and Caroline want to start married life in the Scottish tradition, with a hamefarin’ on the most northerly Shetland Island of Unst. After the bridal march, friends of the bride and groom serve the celebration supper. It’s a time of joyous celebration, of new beginnings and old friends. That is, until Eleanor disappears, and Polly receives a text message, “Don’t bother looking for me. You won’t find me alive.”

 

Detectives Jimmy Perez and Willow Reeves investigate. They discover that Eleanor was desperate to have a child and had lost a baby late in her pregnancy. Before she disappeared, Eleanor claimed to see the ghost of a local child who drowned in the 1920s. Did Eleanor commit suicide? What is the meaning of the apparition? Is the mystery of the child’s death linked to Eleanor’s disappearance?

 

We become a part of the old college crowd, living through the evolution of their relationships and their personal development from students to adults in a competitive world. We are privy to the maturation of the investigative team as well, as they resolve personal as well as professional challenges. Through it all, Cleeves’ tale has as many twists and turns as the cliff paths on the Shetland Islands. The stark remoteness of the Shetland landscape hints at undercurrents that ebb and flow with the tide.

 

Ann Cleeves’ body of work has been long-listed for the Crime Writers Association’s Dagger in the Library Award. This is the 6th entry in the Jimmy Perez series. The other titles are Raven Black, White Nights, Red Bones, Blue Lightning and Silent Voices. Her Jimmy Perez and Vera Stanehope characters are the basis of the television series Shetland. Fans of Peter Robinson, Elizabeth George and Stephen Booth will find a deeply satisfying mystery with an ending you won’t see coming.


 
 

Eight Hundred Grapes

posted by: July 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura DaveEight Hundred Grapes is what it takes to make a single bottle of wine, and one family’s secrets can’t be contained in a bottle in Laura Dave’s excellent new summer read.

 

Georgia Ford walks out of her wedding dress fitting and shows up at her childhood home on her family's vineyard, still wearing her dress, grappling with a major question about her future life with her fiancé, Ben. Looking for the comfort of her parents and her two brothers, not to mention her mother’s famous lasagna, she finds not everything at their once idyllic Last Straw Vineyard is the way it is supposed to be.

 

Her mother seems distracted and far away, her brothers are barely speaking and her father, well, he’s the workaholic he’s always been, but there’s a difference she can’t quite put her finger on. Then, there’s the grapes: Will this year’s harvest be their best but their last? As Georgia stays in her old bedroom and ignores Ben’s frantic phone calls, she finds herself taking on the responsibility of keeping everything and everyone together: The family she thought nothing could ever break apart, the relationship she thought was invincible and the family business, the one constant beauty they have all revolved around for their lives.

 

If you devoured two of the most popular books of last summer, Rainbow Rowell’s Landline and Emma Straub’s The Vacationers, you’ll love Eight Hundred Grapes. Enjoy with a glass of your favorite wine!


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Cover art for Eye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black PressEye on the Struggle: Ethel Payne, the First Lady of the Black Press by James McGrath Morris is the biography of a groundbreaking reporter who covered seminal events of the civil rights movement. Morris, a former journalist himself, writes about Payne’s work in journalism which forged a new path, as a woman and as an African American.   

 

Ethel Payne, born in 1911, was raised in Chicago’s West Englewood area—one of the few enclaves in Chicago which permitted  African-Americans to live outside the racially segregated “Black Belt” neighborhoods. By 30 years old, this granddaughter of slaves was reporting for one of the nation’s preeminent African American newspapers, the Chicago Defender. Her trajectory continued as Ms. Payne reported on civil rights issues domestically and abroad. She investigated the state of black soldiers stationed in Japan and interviewed Vietnam’s General Westmoreland about the treatment of black troops fighting in the war. As a member of the White House Press Corps, she won accolades from Clarence Mitchell after she questioned the Eisenhower administration about discriminatory practices. Payne was present for the signing of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, rubbed elbows with presidents (even entertaining Richard and Patricia Nixon in her home), met with foreign leaders and traveled with Winston Churchill in Africa. Her efforts to end apartheid allowed her a private audience with Nelson and Winnie Mandela. Eye on the Struggle chronicles Payne’s illustrious career, made all the more remarkable by Payne’s unswerving approach of recording events both important to and from the perspective of black Americans. 


 
 

The Doll Maker

posted by: July 3, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Doll MakerJessica Balzano and Kevin Byrne are back and hot on the trail of serial killers in Richard Montanari’s The Doll Maker, the eighth installment of this series about his Philadelphia-based investigators.

 

Byrne is grappling with the impending execution of a woman he put behind bars a decade before. The woman kidnapped and murdered a child, and he is convinced she had a hand in the disappearance of several other children. Determined to get her to confess to these disappearances before she dies, he has to navigate an endless spool of red tape to get close to her. However, there’s a new case developing that will take up all his time.

 

A girl sits placidly on a painted yellow bench as if waiting for a train, a half-smoked cigarette in her fingers. A passing cyclist initially doesn’t think anything is wrong, but then goes in for a closer look. The girl is dead, and the elaborately staged scene around her is part of a sick puzzle designed by killers who call themselves Mr. Marseille and Anabelle. When detectives Balzano and Byrne stumble upon an invitation to tea the next week at the murder site, they know they’re racing against time before the next death.

 

The next death happens, and this time it is two young people, but there’s something even more eerie waiting for the detectives: A doll designed to look exactly like the first victim and another invitation to tea for seven days from now. The victims seem random, but something about them triggers a memory for Byrne about a case he worked long ago.

 

Full of twists and turns and heart-stopping action, The Doll Maker is one to read for those who want to be spooked enough to sleep with the light on. Readers who enjoyed James Patterson’s The Postcard Killers, fans of a series like Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay and those who enjoy the show Criminal Minds will want to dive into the entire Balzano/Byrne series, starting with the first book, The Rosary Girls. 


 
 

Awards Aplenty

posted by: July 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Thief of GloryCover of Ancillary SwordThe Christy Awards were awarded Monday, June 29 at a banquet in Orlando, Florida, with Sigmund Brouwer and Thief of Glory walking away with both "Book of the Year" and "Historical Romance of the Year". The Christy Awards honor and promote excellence in Christian fiction. Awards are given in several genres, including contemporary and suspense. Other winners included Mary Weber’s Storm Siren for "Young Adult" and Feast for Thieves by Marcus Brotherton which picked up the award for "First Novel". The Christy Awards are named in honor of iconic novelist Catherine Marshall’s Christy. A complete list of winners can be found on the Christy Award website.

 

Last weekend, the Locus Award winners were announced in Seattle, Washington, at a banquet emceed by Connie Willis. The Locus Awards are presented to winners of the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus' annual readers poll. Winner of the "Science Fiction Novel of the Year" went to Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie while the "Fantasy Award" winner was The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison. Like the Christys, Locus Awards are also given to best debut and best young adult. Best First Novel was The Memory Garden by Mary Rickert and Young Adult was awarded to Half a King by Joe Abercrombie. For other winners, check out the complete list.


 
 

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