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Ready, Dater One

Ready, Dater One

posted by:
January 15, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Geek's Guide to DatingIt may be as cold as Hoth out there, but Valentine’s Day will soon be upon us, and you want to make sure that you're ready to explore those strange, new worlds of romance. Whether you are a comic book fan, a gamer or a techno-nerd, it’s time to stop being a n00b when it comes to your love life and “boldly go where no geek has gone before!” The Geek’s Guide to Dating by Eric Smith is a great walkthrough guide to help you navigate the dating scene and avoid an epic fail. While most of the book is written for the geek guy, there is still plenty of pertinent information for the geek with XX chromosomes.
 

From selecting your character to first contact and all the way to the boss level, Smith will give you the cheat codes and troubleshooting tips to help make that first date result in a sequel.  Have no fear if you crash and burn, sometimes the princess is in the other castle. You will also learn valuable tips on how to respawn without losing XP.  Filled with colorful eight-bit illustrations and loads of geek culture references, this book is a fun read for geeks of all ages — even if you've already found the droid you were looking for!

Christina

 
 

New Year, New You

New Year, New You

posted by:
January 8, 2014 - 4:10pm

Cover art for Super Shred DietCover art for The Pound a Day DietCover art for The 3-1-2-1 DietIf losing weight and getting in shape top your New Year’s resolutions, three new books will help you maximize success. One celebrity chef and two fitness superstars offer diverse plans which all share the foundations of healthy eating and exercise and promise an end result of melting pounds away.

 

Super Shred: The Big Results Diet by Dr. Ian Smith is a more concentrated program utilizing the principles and building blocks behind Smith’s previous bestseller, Shred. Diet confusion, meal replacement, frequent meals and snacks throughout the day will keep metabolism stoked and reduce hunger pangs. This is the program for those looking to get lean fast or those who have had past success on other programs and need a quick refresher. Smith, a co-host of The Doctors, and medical contributor to the Rachael Ray Show, has a strong social media presence and stays connected with his Shredder Nation via Facebook and Twitter.  

 

Celebrity New York chef Rocco DeSpirito offers a lifestyle plan for dieters to lose up to five pounds every five days in The Pound a Day Diet. This Mediterranean style program allows enjoyment of favorite foods while still losing weight. DeSpirito provides alternatives for weekday and weekend dining with healthy recipes for 28 days. He also shares alternatives for those with no time or inclination to cook. The menus are complemented by his 13-week exercise program which outlines calories lost during various exercises.

 

One of The Biggest Loser’s trainers, Dolvett Quince, reveals his method of losing pounds fast without feeling deprived in The 3-1-2-1 Diet: Eat and Cheat Your Way to Weight Loss. Quince focuses on mental fitness so the physical transformation can follow. His clean eating plan must be adhered to for three days, but then it’s cheat day! Pizza, ice cream or a glass of wine are all permissible indulgences and these cheat days help satisfy physical and psychological cravings while upping metabolism. Quince’s detailed workout regime is all part of his straightforward plan which takes dieters from inception through maintenance.

Maureen

 
 

MIA No Longer

MIA No Longer

posted by:
January 8, 2014 - 8:55am

Cover art for VanishedIn September of 1944, in the final year of World War II, a B-24 bomber piloted by Jack Arnett and carrying 10 servicemen plummeted into the western Pacific Ocean near the Micronesian islands of Palau. The wreckage of the plane disappeared, and the men were presumed dead though no bodies were found. Baltimore author Wil S. Hylton examines the quest of the man who worked to unravel the mystery of crash and the fate of the men on board in Vanished: The Sixty-Year Search for the Missing Men of World War II.

 

In 1993, middle-aged medical researcher Pat Scannon was a novice scuba diver, so when an invitation came to search for the underwater ruins of a sunken Japanese hospital ship supposedly laden with gold stolen during WWII, he was hesitant to accept. While diving on the trip, Scannon saw a wing of a different submerged American plane and became determined to answer the question of what happened to Arnett’s aircraft and crew. He assumed that, due to the massive size of a B-24 bomber, he’d locate the crash site fairly quickly; instead, his detective work spanned more than 10 years.

 

Hylton documents the details of Scannon’s research utilizing books, government documents, archival material and networking with veterans and military contacts. Yet, Vanished is far more than a paper trail. Particularly compelling are the parallel stories of Scannon, the crew members and their families who had been waiting for nearly 60 years for information about the fate of their loved ones. Vanished is a moving account of one man’s determination to lay to rest with honor a forgotten crew of our country’s airmen.  
 

Lori

 
 

Of Banquets and Breadlines

Mastering the Art of Soviet CookingSoviet Russian cooking may conjure up images of boiled cabbage and overcooked potatoes, but Anya von Bremzen’s fascinating food memoir Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing reveals a much more rich and flavorful history as it pertains to Soviet-era dishes. As von Bremzen, a food writer, muses in the prologue: “All happy food memories are alike; all unhappy food memories are unhappy after their own fashion.” Following this sentiment, von Bremzen travels between past and present as she and her mother cook and recreate both the supreme and humble food concoctions relational to their homeland’s state of being. There’s the pre-Bolshevik Revolution richness where dishes boast complex flavors and labor-intensive preparation, the uniformity of Lenin’s new Soviet model when blandness and simplicity prevailed, the starvation years of the Stalin- and World War II-eras which lay bare the “recipes” created solely for survival, and the “Thaw” of the 1950s and 1960s when food began to reappear but scarcity still ruled. In the book’s final chapter, aptly titled “Putin on the Ritz,” the author sees through a 21st century lens the Moscow life of her childhood in all its small pleasures and shortcomings.

 

Von Bremzen and her mother Larissa emigrated to the U.S. in 1974, but not before Anya had a chance to experience both the deprivations and the decadence of Soviet food distribution, depending on one’s connections and/or status as nomenklatura (Communist party appointees). Von Bremzen’s writing is at times dense yet always saturated with flavorful layers, much like the kulebiaka, or fish pie, which dominates much of the first chapter with tales of its preparation. At the end are recipes for some of the dishes discussed, one from each decade, so readers can experience firsthand a taste of history. Russophiles and foodies alike shouldn’t miss this hidden gem which shows how a country’s complex history and its food are intricately connected, and as a result become equally important to its cultural identity.

Melanie

 
 

Naughty or Nice? Just Ask the Baby

Just BabiesWe don’t expect very much from babies. They are supposed to be cute and cuddly but almost everything else has to be done for them. They can’t walk, talk, eat without assistance or clean up after themselves. And when one does something ridiculous it’s almost natural to say, “Oh, they don’t know any better; they’re just a baby.” But what if, in some ways, they did know better? In his new book Just Babies: The Origins of Good and Evil, Paul Bloom, professor of psychology at Yale, would argue that they do.

 

Through his research at Yale and consulting the research of others, Bloom has found that even very small babies as young as three months have a moral compass, a sense of right and wrong, that they use to evaluate the people and the world around them. This sense, acquired at such a young age or perhaps even innate, can influence the moral development of a person through adulthood. But this nascent morality has its limits. Bloom describes how babies and young children are also less compassionate towards strangers and develop cultural biases that can lead to such negative behaviors as bigotry and indifference in the face of suffering.

 

Though his research is very new and his conclusions contain a fair bit of supposition, Bloom makes a very persuasive argument that our moral development and sense of justice is established at an astonishingly young age, and that it affects us throughout our lives. This is a great pick for those interested in evolutionary biology, psychology, childhood development or the study of ethics.

Rachael

 
 

Revisiting Downton Abbey

Lady Catherine, the Earl, and the Real Downton AbbeyBehind the Scenes at Downton AbbeyFrom the start, American audiences fell in love with Downton Abbey. The opening notes of the theme song strike a familiar chord and the characters seem like people who we really know. The popular show’s fourth season premieres in the U.S. on January 5th on PBS. Following the tragic conclusion to season three, fans are curious as to the fates of the show’s beloved characters. Two new books will whet Downtonites’ appetites as they watch the drama unfold.

 

In Lady Catherine, the Earl, and the Real Downton Abbey, Fiona, the Eighth Countess of Carnarvon shares another chapter in the story of the family that lived in Highclere Castle – the real Downton Abbey. American-born Catherine Wendell married Lord Porchester, known as Porchey, in 1922. Soon, he inherited his father’s title, Highclere Castle and the debt that came with it. The couple was forced to auction family heirlooms to raise the funds to keep the castle in the family. While successful, the couple eventually divorced. Countess Fiona shares their stories complete with enough scandal, intrigue and drama to warrant a BBC production. The book also highlights the interesting role that Highclere Castle played during World War II, at times making the house a character in this family’s story. This is a fascinating look at the period and place that frame the show.

 

Emma Rowley’s Behind the Scenes at Downton Abbey: The Official Backstage Pass to the Set, the Actors and the Drama is a new guide to the show with glossy, never-before-seen photographs. Fans will enjoy photographs of the actors, Highclere Castle, the studio set and the show’s sumptuous costumes. The book also includes interviews with the cast, crew and show’s creative team. Throughout this magnificent companion book, the show’s dedication to historical detail is evident. The cast calls historical advisor Alastair Bruce “The Oracle,” and he takes his job seriously. He meticulously studies the historical detail in every element of a scene, from the props, hair and make-up to the actors’ body language. This video is a lighthearted look at the effort that goes into the show’s historical accuracy.

Beth

 
 

How Soon Was Then?

Morrissey AutobiographyNever hesitant to state his strong opinion and create controversy, Morrissey has been a lightning rod since he burst onto the scene as The Smiths’ frontman in the 1980s. Now, with Autobiography, he sets his record straight on the many phases of his life and recording career. Whether or not you find him a hopelessly depressing poseur or are a longtime fan and follower (there really is little middle ground!), this stream-of-consciousness memoir will be of interest to most anyone who listened to the music of the era.

 

Starting with his Manchester childhood and school days, the singer outlines his life through memories that are by turns gauzy and pointed. He shows a surprisingly tight relationship with his family, and includes the tragic deaths of relatives and friends, many of which have seemingly affected his songwriting and have haunted him to this day. Much of the book, naturally, focuses on the many people who Morrissey feels have wronged him. The much-heralded rift between him and his Smiths writing partner Johnny Marr is fairly minor compared to the vitriol Morrissey retains for Mike Joyce, former Smiths drummer, and the British judge that ruled in Joyce’s favor when it came to recording royalties. The usual suspects such as the English music press, the monarchy, Margaret Thatcher, radio DJs, etc. are also the recipients of his bitterness.

 

While there are no chapters or other breaks in his memoir, it reads quickly. Regarding his personal life, he doesn’t directly address his ambiguous sexuality, and the encounters he has with various celebrities are more interesting than mere name-dropping. He places a focus on the constant touring and the fans more than on his songwriting and records produced. By turns heartbreaking, intriguing, frustrating and peppered with Morrissey’s well-known wit, there is no doubt that Autobiography is a product solely his own – no ghostwriters here.

Todd

 
 

Hollywood’s Golden Year

Hollywood’s Golden Year

posted by:
December 30, 2013 - 7:00am

Majestic HollywoodThe Wizard of Oz: The Official 75th Anniversary CompanionThe year 1939 is known as the golden year in Hollywood. Some of the best-known movies in history were introduced to audiences. Gone with the Wind, The Wizard of Oz, Dark Victory, Stagecoach and Mr. Smith Goes to Washington are just a few of these notable films. As the 75th anniversary of that landmark year approaches, Mark A. Vieira’s new book Majestic Hollywood: The Greatest Films of 1939 examines 50 of these unforgettable films. For each movie, Vieira includes a plot summary, notes on the cultural significance of the film, stories from the stars, behind-the-scenes candid photographs and publicity stills. This is a book that film buffs won’t want to miss.

 

Judy Garland’s portrayal of Dorothy in The Wizard of Oz holds a special place in fans’ hearts. She took us all along with her on her adventure down the Yellow Brick Road, and many of us remember eagerly awaiting the movie’s annual television broadcast. Jay Scarfone and William Stillman’s The Wizard of Oz: The Official 75th Anniversary Companion will remind fans of the magic that the movie created. This highly pictorial, oversized book brings the behind-the-scenes look at the making of the movie adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s classic children’s series. Scarfone and Stillman try to bring fans new facts, photos and quotes in this comprehensive commemorative book. Filled with test photographs of the cast and filmmaking secrets, this is a must-read for every Dorothy fan.

 

Many of the films from Hollywood’s golden year are available in BCPL’s collection.

Beth

 
 

You’ve Been Lied To, FYI

You’ve Been Lied To, FYI

posted by:
December 23, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for The De-TextbookHow much of the information you “know” is actually misinformation in disguise? Maybe your first grade teacher simplified a few things in history class, or science hadn’t quite caught up with reality yet, or your parents were just telling you what their parents told them. All (well, some) are revealed in The De-Textbook: The Stuff You Didn’t Know About the Stuff You Thought You Knew by the editors of Cracked.com, a U.S.-based humor website.
 

With a tongue-in-cheek, often slyly humorous style, The De-Textbook takes you from the basic things we are doing wrong everyday (like breathing and sleeping) through more advanced misconceptions in biology, history and psychology, to name a few. This is definitely a book geared toward a more adult audience, as some of the more subtle jokes and innuendos may be confusing to a younger audience, and that's not counting an entire chapter on sex education. Each section is filled with short snippets of information that are hilariously presented accompanied by numerous pictures and illustrations, also hilariously presented. If we had textbooks this engaging in school, maybe we all would have actually learned something.
 

So if you’re curious (or rather, suspicious) about whether ostriches really hide their heads in the sand, or whether the Dark Ages were really all that dark, or perhaps you're wondering how many planets there really are in the Solar System and why scientists can’t seem to make up their minds about it, The De-Textbook is a great place to start. Trivia buffs and fans of Cracked or similar humor sites like The Oatmeal will especially enjoy this one.

Rachael

 
 

Just a Spoonful of Sugar

Cover art for Mary Poppins, She WroteMary Poppins, Julie Andrews and Walt Disney: for most of us, the three are linked together with supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, tea parties on the ceiling and Jane and Michael Banks of 17 Cherry Tree Lane. The name P.L. Travers, however, is recognizable by only the most diehard of Poppins fans, as she is the author of the Mary Poppins children’s book series, as well as the subject of the biography Mary Poppins, She Wrote by Valerie Lawson.

 

P.L. Travers was born in Australia and christened Helen Lyndon Goff; she later adopted Pamela Lyndon Travers as a pseudonym. Travers valued her privacy, and felt protective of the Mary Poppins characters and stories. Lawson explains that each contained elements of Travers’ own rather peripatetic and often difficult life. Initially, Walt Disney encountered resistance from Travers when he approached her about adapting her Poppins books to a film version. The “real” nanny is sharp-tongued, mysterious, controlling and a bit vain. Travers felt Disney would “replace truth with false sentimentality” and called Disney’s movie-making “vulgar.” In the end, Disney’s coffers trumped Travers’ misgivings, and the Julie Andrews version of Mary triumphed on the silver screen.

 

Expect to hear more about P.L. Travers after the  December release of the new movie Saving Mr. Banks which follows Disney as he woos Travers for the film rights to the now-classic movie Mary Poppins.   
 

Lori