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Finding Denzel

Finding Denzel

posted by:
January 16, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for Right Color Wrong CultureAn absorbing study of a timely subject, Right Color, Wrong Culture is an allegorical tale focusing on the challenges and rewards of cultivating a multiethnic organization. In his thoughtful, carefully composed new work, author Bryan Loritts analyzes the specific kind of leadership needed to make connections and build thriving multicultural organizations.

 

Loritts’ central theme explores the premise that in each ethnic group there exist three faces of cultural expression: C1s, those who assimilate entirely from one culture or ethnic group into another; C3s, who are culturally inflexible, resisting assimilation of any kind; and in the middle, C2s, who are culturally flexible and adaptable without losing their ethnic identity. Personifying these faces, Loritts cites Carlton Banks, Ice Cube and Denzel Washington, respectively.

 

Careful to note the ties between culture and ethnicity while recognizing that one is not de facto the other, Loritts proceeds to examine the specific leadership principles vital to the success of a multiethnic, culturally diverse organization. In the case presented, it is an ethnically and culturally homogenous church that the principal characters are striving to transition toward a multicultural identity. Nevertheless, Loritts’ lessons about balanced, intuitive leadership and the practical challenges present in such a transition are applicable to any organization.

 

One of the most compelling aspects of RCWC is the narrative format Loritts has shrewdly chosen to deliver his message. Though a work of nonfiction, RCWC reads more like a novella. His use of a cast of characters to explore the challenges and viewpoints surrounding the case presented is an effective vehicle for what could otherwise be a polarizing subject. Recommended for readers seeking to promote multiculturalism within their own organizations as well as those readers who are simply interested in engaging in a deeper understanding of multiculturalism overall.

 

Meghan

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Hidden Reservoir

Hidden Reservoir

posted by:
January 8, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for EbolaRolling up your sleeve for your flu shot this season, you probably did not think about the zoonoses you are keeping at bay. A zoonosis describes an infection that is transmitted from animal to human. The flu falls into this nasty category, as do other scary things like West Nile Virus, Lyme disease, rabies and, yes, Ebola. Science writer and explorer David Quammen is not trying to scare us in his slender but potent new book, Ebola: The Natural and Human History of a Deadly Virus. Rather, he provides much needed perspective on the 2014 epidemic in West Africa that dominated the news here and abroad.

 

Where did Ebola come from? That's the question everyone wants answered about a disease whose first recognized emergence dates to 1976. Quammen takes us back to that point and the consequences of interconnected ecosystems. He writes in layman's terms about early efforts to sequester various species for testing only to be disappointed each time. "It was Zorro, it was the Swamp Fox, it was Jack the Ripper — dangerous, invisible, gone," Quammen says. This is the problem with a disease that moves, or spills over, from animals to humans. Identifying the reservoir host animal is key to understanding how the virus wreaks havoc, then disappears again, for perhaps decades. The need for containment is great for fear that it will eventually adapt. For scientists, the hunt is on.

 

Quammen, who extracted and updated material from his 2012 book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, spent time in the jungles of Gabon, where he first encountered the "peculiar, disconcerting disease." Through interviews with laboratory sleuths and Ebola victims' families he fills in as many blanks as possible, writing in a highly readable journalistic style. Readers of Richard Preston's The Hot Zone, whom Quammen gently takes to task in his book, will find a fast-paced science mystery that urgently begs solving.

Cynthia

 
 

Swept Away

Swept Away

posted by:
January 7, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for Storm SurgeWith infinite care, deep detail and vast meteorological knowledge, Adam Sobel recounts the events leading up to one of the most destructive storms in history in Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate, and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future. Sobel, an atmospheric scientist and Columbia University Professor, recounts the growth of the storm and the predictions leading up to the disaster which were relied upon by elected officials, civic leaders and the general public.

 

Studies have shown that there is an approximate four to one benefit to cost ratio of investing in preventive measures, yet we lack the imagination to foresee the potential for disasters such as Sandy. Historically, we experience a disaster and then plan for the next event. However, with global warming gradually making its effects known, we may not realize the disaster in time to take effective measures. With this scenario, Sobel argues, “buying insurance after the flood will not work.” Development of low-lying areas, a rising sea level and climbing global temperatures will produce great environmental challenges. This will require broad cooperation between local, state and federal agencies and the private sector. Through clear-headed science, Sobel argues that we cannot afford to politicize an issue of such profound international importance as climate change. Storm Surge is a highly thought-provoking, engrossing tale of nature at her most destructive. It is also a story of human nature, and how we react, or fail to react, to our environment and its demands.

 

Dr. Sobel received his PhD in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a tenured professor at Columbia University. He has won several major awards, including the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, the Meisinger Award from the American Meteorological Society, the AXA Award in climate and extreme weather and the Ascent Award from the American Geophysical Union.

Leanne

 
 

Downton Abbey: Rules for Household Staff

Downton Abbey: Rules for Household Staff

posted by:
December 15, 2014 - 8:00am

Downton Abbey: Rules for Household StaffWritten from the perspective of Downton’s own trusted butler, Carson, Rules for Household Staff is anything but the dry instructional manual its title would suggest. Carson’s careful and precise introduction brings a depth of dignity to the serving class in keeping with the series’ sensitive depiction of its members.

 

Referring to servants as Improvers of Lives, Carson likens those who enter the profession to “doctors and nurses” who “heal and make well lives that can be fraught with worry and responsibility.” Clearly, those who serve – at least at Downton – are called to do so, and by the correct and efficient discharge of their duties, they may aspire to master their chosen career. To this end, the remainder of the volume is dedicated.

 

Replete with useful notes and instruction on a staggering variety of practical duties and behavioral obligations, Rules for Household Staff is a surprisingly concise and markedly engaging read. Readers who follow the series will develop a deeper understanding of the downstairs characters in Downton, as well as a keener appreciation of the responsibilities each member of the household bears in the running of the abbey. Along the way, readers may also pick up some unexpectedly useful skills, such as napkin folds, the proper procedure for decanting wine and a nontoxic method for ridding the kitchen of flies.

 

Recommended for history enthusiasts and in particular for fans of the Downton Abbey series. Those who have already enjoyed Rules for Household Staff may also appreciate The Chronicles of Downton Abbey.

Meghan

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LOL-Worthy Literary Conversations

LOL-Worthy Literary Conversations

posted by:
December 12, 2014 - 8:00am

Texts from Jane EyreMallory Ortberg’s Texts from Jane Eyre: And Other Conversations with Your Favorite Literary Characters is a funny, irreverent take on what it would be like if famous authors and classic literary characters texted. Ortberg takes books and authors that we read in high school or college and retells their stories in text form. From Hamlet to Elizabeth Bennett to the Lorax, from Edgar Allan Poe to William Wordsworth to Emily Dickinson, no character or author is out of reach for Ortberg.

 

Ortberg uses classic characters like Jo March and Jane Eyre, juxtaposed with more modern ones like the twins from Sweet Valley High and the members of the Baby Sitters Club. She brings these characters to life through text speak and emoticons, making the reader crack up at the thought of Plato texting the cave allegory to a close friend, or Hamlet text-yelling at his mother to keep out of his room. The texts referenced in the title of the book are particularly amusing—Mr. Rochester’s in all caps and Jane Eyre’s cool and distant, as he tries to lure her back to him.

 

Ortberg, one of the co-editors and founders of The Toast website and a prolific Twitter user, has translated her hilarious online writing career into print with Texts from Jane Eyre. Readers will be laughing along as they relive some of their favorite (or least favorite) literary characters in text message form. This is one that former English majors will devour!

 

Laura

 
 

Wit and Wisdom

Wit and Wisdom

posted by:
December 11, 2014 - 8:00am

Maeve's TimesBeloved Irish novelist Maeve Binchy once said, “I am obsessively interested in what some may consider the trivia of other people’s lives.” Her people watching paid off in her novels but also in her work as a journalist for The Irish Times, where she serendipitously launched her writing career. Maeve’s Times: In Her Own Words is a selected collection of her work spanning five decades at the newspaper as a women’s editor, columnist, feature writer and reporter. When her novels became bestsellers, she resigned her full-time position but continued contributing until her death in 2012.

 

This volume chronologically organizes some favorite pieces from her long tenure and groups them into decades from the 1960s through the 2000s. Her eye for detail, so prevalent in her novels, serves her well in chronicling various topics ranging from the lighthearted to the controversial. Her humor and drollness are evident in each article, whether it be musings about dull airline companions or honest thoughts about more provocative subjects such as the plight of the Irish working in England. And she was also an almost giddy reporter on the shenanigans of the royals and in attendance at many of the weddings, including Charles and Diana’s in 1981.

 

Readers will acquire a better understanding of Binchy’s treasured homeland as the anthology also serves as a sociological study and cultural commentary on a changing Ireland. This entertaining collection will delight her legion of devotees who will get to know her a little better while enjoying the cherished characteristics of her writing – wit, wisdom and compassion.

Maureen

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Author Carine McCandless to Speak at Arbutus Branch

Cover art for The Wild TruthIn 1992, 24-year-old Chris McCandless gave away his savings and most of his worldly possessions and embarked on his dream trip, a quest in the Alaskan wilderness. His adventure ended in his tragic death in an abandoned bus just off the Stampede Trail near Denali National Park. Chris’ story was the subject of Jon Krakauer’s bestselling nonfiction book Into the Wild in 1996, and it was later made into a film directed by Sean Penn. Krakauer’s book focused mainly on Chris’ journey and the end of his life, but it left many questions about his past and his motivations unanswered, leading to many widely held misconceptions about Chris.

 

Because of the popularity of Into the Wild, people think that they know Chris’ story, but there’s much more than meets the eye. While Krakauer was researching his book, Chris’ sister Carine McCandless shared more about her family and Chris’ childhood with him, even allowing Krakauer to read some of her brother’s letters relating his feelings about unpleasant details of life in the McCandless home. To protect her parents and half siblings, Carine asked Krakauer not to include the letters in his book. Now, Carine McCandless is revealing those details in The Wild Truth, a book she hopes will allow readers to view her brother’s life and actions through a more accurate lens.

 

Above all things, Chris McCandless valued truth, and Carine’s raw and honest account of their family life builds a much clearer picture of what drove Chris to take his journey. This unforgettable story is my favorite new nonfiction book this fall. The Wild Truth is not just for fans of Into the Wild. It’s also a must-read for readers who are drawn to family memoirs.

 

We are delighted that Carine McCandless will speak about her book and her brother’s legacy at the Arbutus Branch on Saturday, December 6 at 2 p.m. Readers can hear directly from Carine and have the opportunity to ask her questions about The Wild Truth. Find out more information about this event.

Beth

 
 

The Worst Fear

Cover art for The FallCover art for On ImmunityAsk parents to share their deepest fear and, inevitably, it involves something tragic happening to their child. In Diogo Mainardi’s The Fall: A Father’s Memoir in 424 Steps, Mainardi writes about the intersection of grandeur and error which led to his son’s disabling cerebral palsy. On Immunity: An Inoculation by Eula Biss examines modern medicine’s sometimes controversial practice of vaccination.

 

424. That’s the number of footsteps taken by Tito Mainardi as he and his father walk to Venice Hospital where he was born, and where physician error resulted in his brain injury. It’s also the number of brief passages that make up this small memoir in which Mainardi finds connections between art, architecture, music and history, and relates them back to Tito and his illness. Profoundly moving and structured by concentric links, The Fall demonstrates that tragedy and beauty may not be such a dichotomy after all.

 

Red-faced and screaming or silently stoic: either way, it can be tough as a parent to put a child through the often painful series of recommended inoculations. Even more difficult would be wondering if your child’s autism was triggered by a vaccine or passing on those shots only to see a child hospitalized with whooping cough. Biss looks at the varied reasons behind a parent’s decision to decline immunizations, which include African and Middle Eastern Muslim fears of a western plot to harm their children via the polio vaccine to American concerns about greedy pharmaceutical companies or political agendas pushing unnecessary and invasive medicine — all of which compromise the “herd immunity” protecting communities from disease outbreak. On Immunity provides a thoughtful view on the impact of vaccines on contemporary public health.

Lori

 
 

Life Lessons

Life Lessons

posted by:
November 28, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for Don't Give Up, Don't Give InWar hero and Olympian Louis Zamperini died last July at the age of 97, but was able to finish Don’t Give Up, Don’t Give In: Lessons from an Extraordinary Life with co-author David Rensin. This inspirational volume is filled with Zamperini’s wisdom and insight garnered from a long life of remarkable experiences.

 

Zamperini was an American World War II prisoner of war survivor, an Olympic distance runner and, in his later years, a popular, inspirational speaker. His remarkable life has absorbed readers in both his autobiography, Devil at My Heels and Laura Hillenbrand’s bestselling Unbroken. Don’t Give Up, Don’t Give In is not a rehash of prior books. Instead readers learn more about the man, his personality and his will to endure from previously untold stories. Faced with one horrific event after another, including a plane crash and a brutal Japanese prisoner of war camp, Zamperini refused to give up and chose to view hardships as challenges. After the war, the adventures continued and even included a showdown with Frank Sinatra! Zamperini is honest in answering the questions he received repeatedly from fans and in revealing his secrets to living an honorable but exciting faith-based life.

 

Zamperini’s incredible life story will be brought to the big screen next month with Angelina Jolie’s adaptation of Unbroken. Watch the trailer of this film, already generating award buzz, written by the Coen brothers and featuring Jack O’Donnell.
 

Maureen

 
 

Leslie Knope Approved This Message

Cover art for Yes Please by Amy PoehlerAmy Poehler wants you to know that writing a book is very, very hard to do. She handles the pressure well in her memoir, Yes Please.

 

Delving into her deep-rooted love for all things comedy, Poehler shares hilarious stories from her performing past. She shares how, as a 10-year-old playing the role of Dorothy in a school production of The Wizard Of Oz, she was able to get her first audience to laugh and how she has been chasing that feeling ever since. From her college years through her work with improv troupe (and later Comedy Central show) The Upright Citizens Brigade, Poehler stresses the value of hard work as the source of her success. Fans of her work on Saturday Night Live and Parks and Recreation will not be disappointed either — several chapters share inside jokes, back stories and funny mishaps on the sets of both beloved shows.

 

Her vast work experience isn’t the only engaging part of this memoir: Poehler also gets personal. Her reflections on motherhood and raising her two boys, Archie and Abel, demonstrate her creativity in parenting. She doesn’t directly address her divorce with comedian Will Arnett, but does offer a hilarious chapter on some divorce books she would like to someday write, such as “I Want a Divorce! See You Tomorrow!” and “The Holidays Are Ruined!” There are lots of stories about her friendships with recognizable names, like Tina Fey and Louis C.K. Best friend Seth Meyers also contributes a short chapter.  

 

Inter-chapters feature some interesting “advice,” and the book shows off some great keepsakes: a letter from Hillary Clinton welcoming Archie into the world, a signed photo of The Wire’s Michael K. Williams and many photographs and relics from her childhood, including poems she wrote when she was little.

 

This memoir is perfect for any fan of Amy Poehler, her work or comedy in general. Her wealth of experience in a variety of venues and acts will inspire and educate those looking to “break into the biz,” and her ideas about everything from performing sketch comedy nine-months pregnant to how our cell phones will eventually kill us will amuse and entertain any reader. After reading, pick up some of her best work, like Parks and Recreation or Saturday Night Live: The Best of Amy Poehler on DVD.
 

Jessica