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In Memory of Maya Angelou

Today, the world lost Maya Angelou. Yet we will never lose the irreplaceable voice she used to shape our world to make it a more compassionate and stronger place.

 

She is most widely known for her first memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, in which she reveals the hardships she endured being both an African-American and a girl in the Jim Crow South. In her memoirs, she expresses such complicated themes as race, identity and womanhood in an honest style that illuminates the human condition. In her last book, Mom & Me & Mom, Angelou investigated the loving yet complex relationship she had with her robust mother, an exceptional person in her own right.

 

Along with telling her own story, Angelou used her unique voice in other transformative ways. She was a poet. Her stimulating poetry is gathered in The Complete Collected Poems of Maya Angelou. She was a singer, a dancer, an educator and her voice continues to reach far beyond the literary realm. Angelou was a vigorous civil rights advocate, working alongside Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X. Multiple presidents honored her linguistic power by having her speak as the heart of the nation. In her words and throughout her life, Angelou proved "one isn't necessarily born with courage, but one is born with potential. Without courage, we cannot practice any other virtue with consistency. We can't be kind, true, merciful, generous or honest." She embodied these virtues and instilled them in others, to the benefit of us all.

Sarah Jane

 
 

Grillin’ and Chillin’

Grillin’ and Chillin’

posted by:
May 28, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Guy on FireCover art for Smokin' in the Boys' RoomCover art for Fresh GrillingSummer weather is here, and these new cookbooks will help you wow the guests at your next cookout or tailgate party. These delicious and creative new spins on barbecue favorites are the perfect way to fire up your summer grilling season.

 

Food Network star Guy Fieri is kicking off summer with Guy on Fire: 130 Recipes for Adventures in Outdoor Cooking. The book is packed with color photos and Fieri’s tips to help you look like a star. Try mouthwatering new recipes like Bacon Wrapped Hot Dogs with Spicy Relish, Chipotle Corn Salad with Grilled Bacon, Cast-Iron Beef Tenderloin with Huckleberry Sauce and Korean Fried Chicken Wings. Guy on Fire will help you make your backyard barbecue an official stop on the Flavortown Express.

 

If you’re looking for tips from a barbecue champion, pick up Melissa Cookston’s Smokin’ in the Boys’ Room: Southern Recipes from the Winningest Woman in Barbecue. Cookston, who has appeared on shows like Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives and BBQ Pitmasters, includes recipes for smoky barbecue favorites and her must-have Southern sides and desserts. Color photos and easy-to-follow instructions will help home cooks get the same delicious results as the pros. Recipes include basics like rubs and sauces as well as showstoppers like Grilled Quail with Bacon BBQ Sauce, Cayenne Grilled Peaches and Fire-Grilled Pork T-Bones with Hoe Cakes and Mississippi Caviar.

 

For lighter fare, try Better Homes and Gardens’ new cookbook Fresh Grilling: 200 Delicious Good-for-You Seasonal Recipes. These recipes celebrate the fresh flavors of summer and help you provide lighter, healthier alternatives. Their recipes for Chili-glazed Salmon Burgers, Grilled Vegetable Tostadas with Mole Sauce and Heirloom Tomato Salad with Grilled Tuna and Cannellini Beans will make your mouth water.

 

Other notable new grilling cookbooks include The Nolan Ryan Beef & Barbecue Cookbook: Recipes from a Texas Kitchen by baseball legend Nolan Ryan and The Essential New York Times Grilling Cookbook: More Than 100 Years of Sizzling Food Writing and Recipes.

Beth

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I Wanna Be a Billionaire

Blood Will Out by Walter KirnWell, gee, who doesn’t want the ease of a life cushioned by wealth and the power that big money confers. Don’t forget a name to go with that money: A name which, when used, causes a table to open up at a restaurant or a museum open after hours for an impromptu private tour. Christian Karl Gerhartsreiter wanted all of this, too, so he took a shortcut and started calling himself Clark Rockefeller. Marylanders may remember when the “Rockefeller” scams unraveled; he was arrested in Baltimore in 2008, subject of a much publicized manhunt following his abduction of his daughter during a court-supervised visitation. Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery, and a Masquerade by Walter Kirn reveals Gerhartsreiter’s long term deceits spanning over a quarter century involving multiple identities.

 

How could Gerhartsreiter fool so many people for such a long time? Author Kirn is particularly well-placed to examine this issue since he considered Clark Rockefeller a friend for over 10 years, a friendship which began when Kirn traveled cross-country to deliver a paralyzed dog being adopted by Rockefeller. Kirn was never adequately reimbursed for his trip expenses, setting a precedent which remained unchanged throughout their association. From landlords to exclusive social clubs to women, Gerhartsreiter duped them all, impersonating Ivy League grads, British aristocracy and America’s hoi polloi. He lived by leeching off people willing to turn a blind eye to discrepancy in return for the satisfaction of rubbing elbows with what Gerhartsreiter purported to represent.

 

Blood Will Out unmasks Gerhartsreiter to reveal not an urbane gentleman but a dangerous and manipulative con man who ultimately was convicted of the grisly killing of a former neighbor. Kirn’s honest evaluation of his own willingness to believe an obvious liar and become part of the deception exposes the symbiotic nature of a relationship between the swindler and the swindled.  

Lori

 
 

Contemporary Comfort

Contemporary Comfort

posted by:
May 9, 2014 - 7:00am

Carla's Comfort Foods by Carla HallBack Home with the Neely's by Pat and Gina NeelyTwo new cookbooks by three noted celebrity chefs offer modern twists on favorite comfort food which are sure to appeal to the most skittish of home cooks. Both volumes are beautifully photographed with functional layouts and come complete with tips and instructions.

 

Hootie Hoo! The Chew co-host and Top Chef fan-favorite, Carla Hall, offers an international spin in Carla’s Comfort Foods: Favorite Dishes from Around the World. This sumptuous feast will tantalize the senses as readers travel the culinary globe in search of delectable delights. Featuring over 100 recipes, Carla selects a cooking technique or main ingredient and follows with international variations. For example, partnered with Italian-American lasagna are Irish shepherd’s pie and Mexican enchiladas. The mouthwatering variations are all readily accomplished at home, and Carla’s easy, conversational style is encouraging. The international spice chart is an education in seasoning, and is at the root of Carla’s philosophy that food is food around the world – it’s the spices that make all the difference.

 

For married couple Pat and Gina Neely, restaurateurs and hosts of the hit Food Network series Down Home with the Neelys, food is at the center of a happy home. In their latest cookbook, Back Home with the Neelys: Comfort Food from our Southern Kitchen to Yours, this dynamic duo revisits 100 family recipes passed down through generations and creates new dishes using the past as inspiration. Think Bourbon French Toast, Crunchy Fried Okra and Mama Rena's Brunswick Stew. Mmmmm! The Neelys share family anecdotes along with the recipes which will lead readers on their own journey down memory lane. While rooted in tradition, the Neelys also capture the spirit and flavors of modern and fresh Southern cooking.

Maureen

 
 

Between the Covers with Rob Kasper

Rob KasperBaltimore Beer: A Satisfying History of Charm City BrewingBaltimore author Rob Kasper will discuss his book Baltimore Beer: A Satisfying History of Charm City Brewing, at 7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 6, at the Perry Hall Branch. This program is sponsored by the Friends of the Perry Hall Library. Kasper, who also had a prolific career as a writer and reporter for The Baltimore Sun, recently answered questions for Between the Covers about his book.

 

How long had the idea for Baltimore Beer been, well, brewing, before you put pen to paper? At what point did you decide to make a serious study of Baltimore beer and the history of local breweries?

 

About 10 years. One day at The Sun I got a call saying National Premium was no longer being bottled (it has since been revived). Reading the clips to write the story, I realized there was no current history of Baltimore breweries. Originally I had a contract with the publishing arm of Bibelot bookstores to write the book. They went bankrupt and the project lay dormant, then I got a contract with History Press and finished the book.

 

What was the most interesting or the oddest piece of information about Baltimore beer or breweries that you discovered in your research?

 

Three things come to mind that show how breweries were a major part of Baltimore’s social fabric. One, how German the city of Baltimore was. In addition to all the breweries, city council notes were printed in German and English until World War I. Two, how the Lone Ranger’s silver bullet and some National Premium executives coaxed the owner of the Washington Senators into letting the Orioles move to Baltimore in 1954. Three, when a fisherman caught Diamond Jim III (a rockfish tagged by American Brewing Company) and won $25,000, the fisherman argued that catching the fish was civic achievement and therefore tax free. A judge was amused but said the fisherman owed $6,000 in taxes.

 

For more than three decades, you were a reporter, columnist and editorial writer for The Baltimore Sun. What are a few notable moments or highs from your career with the newspaper?

 

I won a handful of national writing awards for my columns which buoyed me, but the most gratifying part of the job was the feedback from readers – phone calls, letters and comments from folks I bumped into who had read something I had written. Mostly they liked what I had written, but sometimes not.

 

You’ve made a career in Baltimore, but you grew up in Kansas. How did you find your way to the East Coast?

 

All the great seafood lovers grew up in the Midwest. That is because when folks out here were eating rockfish on Fridays, we were chewing on fish sticks. When I came to Maryland to work at The Sun, (after a five-year stop at the Louisville Courier-Journal and Times and a one-day – yes, one-day – stint at the National Observer) I tasted crab soup, crab cakes, steamed crabs and soft crabs. There was no going back. I once beat Brooks Robinson in a celebrity crab picking contest – not bad for a guy from Dodge City. But I later got demolished by Shirley Phillips, of Phillips Seafood. She used a knife to slice up the steamed crabs. The way she wielded that knife, you wouldn’t want to cross her.

 

Okay, we need to ask: Your favorite beer?

 

Well, like Ado Annie in Oklahoma!, the girl who cain’t say no, my favorite depends on whom I am with. At Brewer’s Art it is Resurrection; at Union Craft it is Duckpin; at Heavy Seas it is Loose Cannon; at Pratt Street Ale House it is Extra Special Bitter; at DuClaw it is Black Jack Stout; at Flying Dog it is Snake Dog. The beer I still pine for is pilsner from the long-gone Baltimore Brewing Company. That was exceptional. I make do substituting with Victory Prima Pils and the Pendulum Pilsner from RavenBeer.

 

Tell us a little about Baltimore Beer Week, a nonprofit that celebrates local brewing, which you helped to found.

 

My contributions to Beer Week pale compared with those of Joe Gold and Dominic Cantalupo and the late Mick Kipp. But basically it is a 10-day celebration in October of all things beery in Baltimore. There are tastings, beer dinners and tours of breweries, including the classic old American Brewery, now home to the nonprofit Humanin. I try to provide historical background and remind beer drinkers that the good stuff they are enjoying today was built on the shoulders of generations of brewers before them.

Melanie

 
 

Throwback Thursday

Throwback Thursday

posted by:
April 24, 2014 - 8:00am

The Satanic VersesAll I Really Need to Know I Learned in KindergartenTake a ride 25 years into the past to April 1989, when side ponytails, shoulder pads and acid-washed jeans were ubiquitous amidst a wash of ever-present neon. The “Why Not?” Orioles were rebounding from a terrible year and headed toward second place in the American League East, and Billy Ripken’s obscenity-laced baseball card was the talk of the nation. In theaters, moviegoers were being entertained by Field of Dreams and Pet Sematary. On the small screen, viewers were enjoying debut seasons of Roseanne, Murphy Brown and China Beach and getting ready to say goodbye to favorites such as Dynasty, Family Ties and the long-running American Bandstand. Wonder what was going on in books? Well, readers in 1989 had good taste! The top titles on both the fiction and nonfiction New York Times best seller lists have withstood the passage of time and remain perennial favorites.

 

The top fiction title was The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie.  First published in the United Kingdom to positive reviews, this title was a Booker Prize Finalist and won the 1988 Whitbread Award for novel of the year. Major controversy surrounded the book, with some conservative Muslims calling it blasphemous and a fatwa calling for Rushdie’s death issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran. Rounding out the list were Star by Danielle Steel, a tale of star-crossed love, and two titles that are now staples on high school reading lists: A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving and The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan.

 

And who could forget the fervor surrounding the top nonfiction title? All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten by Robert Fulghum contained inspirational essays about everyday matters and struck a chord with readers and gift givers everywhere. Today, there are more than 7 million copies in print in over 90 countries. Also on the nonfiction list were two regularly read titles that have become contemporary classics – A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, which has sold more than 10 million copies to date, and Blind Faith by Joe McGinnis. 

Maureen

 
 

The Art of the Big Sulk

The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not StayHooman Majd is an Iranian-American, a well-known and respected journalist who is critical of the Iranian government as well as the son of a high-ranking diplomat for the Shah. All of these factors would be good reason for Majd to limit his time in Iran. Majd has travelled in and out of Iran for years, often escorting U.S. journalists. He has published two previous books on the country, which were critical of the Iranian government. Majd grew up in the U.S. and Britain, but like many political refugees, he has always felt the pull of his home country. In his book, The Ministry of Guidance Invites You to Not Stay, Majd recounts the nearly year-long stay in Tehran that he and his family embark upon.

 

This journey begins when his family moves there during a tumultuous time in Iran – on the cusp of the Arab Spring and the failure of the Green Movement reforms. Majd talks about the big issues while also discussing the minutiae of an American family trying to live in a country devoid of Starbucks and organic food stores. His narrative is often humorous, and it is at its best when discussing the average Iranian people, who have an incredibly self-deprecating view, a voracious love of politics and an admiration for American ideals.

 

Majd looks at Iranian cultural features like “sulking” and exaggeration and shows them in everyday life as well as how they play out in the domestic and international political arenas. What emerges is a portrait of a modern capitalist country that, while still repressive, has a very healthy political dialogue, including reporting on every juicy bit of gossip about leaders like they were the Kardashians. The people desire to stay Islamic but also to become more open and liberal. Majd sees the U.S./Iranian relationship as a version of a Persian “Big Sulk,” with an Iranian government ready to resume ties with the U.S., but only after the U.S. makes a demonstration of apology for past wrongs and expresses a desire for such a relationship. It’s an intriguing possibility, but one that the U.S. would be politically unable to explore. Ultimately, Majd is on a journey to discover the Persian identity, both his own and his homeland’s.

Brian

 
 

America’s First Spies

Washington's Spies: The Story of America's First Spy Ring by Alexander RoseAMC’s new Revolutionary War television series, Turn, brings viewers into a world of espionage, covert operations, code breaking and double agents. The show is based on historian Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies: The Story of America’s First Spy Ring. In this case, fact is every bit as exciting as fiction. Rose tells the story of the Culper Ring, a small network of spies who operated under the direction of George Washington. This unusual group of spies worked unlike anyone before, and the Culper Ring’s activities laid the foundation for modern spy craft. Rose shares more about the groundbreaking band of spies in this interview.

 

This compelling and fascinating chapter of the Revolutionary War probably isn’t much like the story that you remember from your high school history class. Turn showrunner Craig Silverstein explains, “What we’re told in school is that it was a very David vs. Goliath tale, that we fought the British for our freedom. In reality, it was a war fought between neighbors; it was fought house to house … It wasn’t like we were repelling an alien invasion force; it was more like a divorce.”

 

Turn premiered on AMC on April 6. Get a taste of this exciting new series in this preview.

Beth

 
 

2014 Pulitzer Prizes Announced

Cover art for The GoldfinchThe winners of the 2014 Pulitzer Prize were announced this afternoon. In addition to the awards for journalism, prizes are also given in the area of Letters, Drama, and Music. Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch took this year’s prize for Fiction. The judges said that The Goldfinch is "a beautifully written coming-of-age novel with exquisitely drawn characters that follows a grieving boy’s entanglement with a small famous painting that has eluded destruction, a book that stimulates the mind and touches the heart." A favorite in the category, The Goldfinch was featured on many lists of the best books of 2013 and has been very popular with BCPL readers.

 

Other winners include Margaret Fuller: A New American Life by Megan Marshall for Biography, 3 Sections by Vijay Seshadri for Poetry, Toms River: A Story of Science and Salvation by Dan Fagin for General Nonfiction, The Internal Enemy: Slavery and War in Virginia, 1772-1832 by Alan Taylor for History and The Flick by Annie Baker for Drama.

 

For a list of all the winners, click here.
 

Beth

 
 

Between the Covers with Donna Jackson Nakazawa

Donna Jackson NakazawaThe Last Best Cure by Donna Jackson NakazawaThe Autoimmune Epidemic by Donna Jackson NakazawaBaltimore author Donna Jackson Nakazawa discusses her latest book, The Last Best Cure, on Wednesday, April 16 at 7 p.m. at the Perry Hall Branch, sponsored by the Friends of the Perry Hall Library. The award-winning science journalist and writer recently answered questions for Between the Covers about her book.

 

Before The Last Best Cure, you authored another book about autoimmune diseases, The Autoimmune Epidemic. What insights or new knowledge did you gain between that book and The Last Best Cure? What was going on in your life prior to writing these books?

 

The Autoimmune Epidemic focused on how modern chemicals in the world around us and in our diet are overwhelming the human immune system, contributing to rising disease rates and chronic illnesses. The Last Best Cure takes this research a step further and investigates “psychoneuroimmunology,” a new field of study that investigates how mind states, such as anxiety, fear, worry, rumination, anger and pain, can end up damaging our immune function in much the same way as environmental chemicals. Prior to this, I was struggling with my own health crises. The Last Best Cure is my chronicle of a one-year doctor/patient experiment to see if altering my mood state might shift my inflammatory markers and perhaps even improve my physical well-being.

 

The Last Best Cure has received much critical praise, described as a book that will offer hope for recovery, and change and save lives. What is the most important insight or piece of information you want readers to take away from your book?

 

I want people to know that there already exists an understanding as to how we can activate the healing potential of the brain. Understanding how to do this gives us powerful tools, ways to change the messages our brain is sending to our cells and our body. Everyone deserves to live the life they want, and these tools can help us all achieve a greater sense of well-being, and even joy.   

 

You were already an award-winning science journalist and writer when you began writing these last two books. What was it like writing professionally about a topic that was also very personal to you? Were there any “aha” moments for your own life as you were writing?

 

At first, I was only going to write about my personal experiences in the introduction to The Last Best Cure, but my editor thought readers would want to read more about how I also went on this transformational journey myself. She thought it would help convey to readers that we can all take this journey, no matter what physical or emotional health challenges we face. There was so much that I realized along the way about adversity, self-respect and how they play a role in adult illness. Now I’m profoundly grateful to have taken this journey: Life is sweeter, relationships are better and it’s a better, more meaningful way to live.

 

In addition to being about healing and recovering personal joy, The Last Best Cure is a story about a health epidemic. What steps do we need to take now to secure a better health outlook for future generations?

 

We need to absolutely, completely and radically change how we view the doctor/patient relationship. If we keep up the current “medical factory” model we’re going to see very little progress in managing chronic health issues. Right now, 133 million adults in America have chronic illnesses, not counting the 22 million with addiction – and these numbers are rapidly climbing. The tools to help patients participate in their own healing and facilitate greater well-being exist; it just requires that physicians incorporate new practices into their doctor/patient paradigm. In order to do this, we must change the way we as a society view treatment, health care and the doctor/patient relationship.

 

Are there any new books in the works?

 

Yes, one due out at the end of next year called Childhood Interrupted: How Adversity in the Past Writes the Story of Our Future – And How We Can Change the Script (Atria/Simon & Schuster). It’s a deeper, more extended study of how childhood adversity can create changes in the brain and in our immunology that impact our health long into adulthood – and what we can do to reverse those effects as adults. I’m telling cutting-edge stories of science, about how even very common forms of childhood adversity can reset our immune system to be more stress-reactive, sparking a state of chronic low-grade neuroinflammation for life. I want to help readers understand how the stress we meet in childhood can determine our lifelong "set point" for emotional reactivity, inflammation, disease and depression – and what we can do to reverse the impact of early adversity and trauma years later, in adulthood, to regain our physical and emotional well-being.

 

How long has the Baltimore area been home to you? What do you like best about living in this area?

 

My family moved to Baltimore four years ago from Annapolis; my mom and my husband’s parents were already living here, so it just made sense. What I like best about Baltimore is its people. Baltimoreans are real, genuine, honest, intellectual, creative, smart and energetic. They’re committed to their community and engaged in making this a better place to live. We love it here. It’s a vibrant place to be.

 

To learn more about The Last Best Cure, please visit the author’s website or link with her on Facebook.

Melanie