Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
In The News


RSS this blog



+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction


+ Fiction



+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews


In the News



Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee

posted by: July 24, 2015 - 2:23pm

Cover art for Go Set a WatchmanLet’s get it out of the way: Harper Lee’s new book Go Set a Watchman is no To Kill a Mockingbird. For 55 years, the reclusive Lee has been lauded for her Pulitzer Prize-winning story of racial inequality and justice in Alabama as told by young Scout, and yet Lee remained a curiosity by shunning publicity and never publishing another word. Earlier this year, the book world was set atwitter with the news that Lee had agreed to the publication of Watchman, an early and forgotten manuscript said to be fodder for what became her beloved classic.


Go Set a Watchman opens with Scout, now Jean Louise Finch and a NYC resident, riding the sleeper car train back to Maycomb for her annual visit. She thinks about marrying childhood friend Hank who now practices law with Atticus, and she prepares for the inevitable head-butting with her Aunt Alexandra, who remains ever the example of proper Southern womanhood. Instead, grown-up Scout finds that she can’t go home again as she discovers the men she reveres have feet of clay, ascribing to a repugnant philosophy of white supremacy, paternalism and disenfranchisement.


Lee’s particular gift of filtering a puzzling world through the mindset of a child shines in Watchman, just as in To Kill a Mockingbird. Jean Louise’s memory of when she, Jem and Dill played a backyard game of church revival, which ends with a naked Scout’s “baptism” in an algae-slicked fish pond, is a lovely and gently sardonic poke at small town religious tradition. Both stories deal with coming of age in a community governed by a rigid unforgiving class structure which neither blacks nor whites escape. Watchman, however, seems more firmly rooted in a past when ugly language and divisive actions were acceptable in polite society, and here Jean Louise is left dealing with the unsatisfying ambiguities of adulthood.


Isaiah 21, verse 6: For thus hath the Lord said unto me, Go, set a watchman, let him declare what he seeth. The watchman is both the announcer of the events he witnesses and a moral compass. Go Set a Watchman serves to remind the reader of the imperative to follow one’s conscience.



Go Set a Watchman

posted by: July 10, 2015 - 10:00am

Cover art for Go Set a Watchman

Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, set for publication on July 14, is one of the most anticipated books in recent memory. Publisher Harper Collins has said that pre-orders for this novel are the highest in company history. The book has been closely guarded, but now a few details are being revealed with both The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian previewing the first chapter available here. If you want to get a taste of Reese Witherspoon’s narration of the audio book, here’s a sneak listen to the first chapter.


Lee’s second novel takes place in the 1950s, 20 years after her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, and opens with Scout returning by train to Maycomb, Alabama. Lee has said the novel did not undergo any revisions since she completed the manuscript in the 1950s and is “humbled and amazed that this will now be published after all these years.”


Learn more about this big event, including a preview of PBS’ Thirteen Days of Harper Lee, on BCPL’s tumblr, and be sure to check back for a Between the Covers post about the novel soon!


Celebrate the 2015 Tony Awards

posted by: June 5, 2015 - 7:00am

Tony AwardsThe Antoinette Perry Award for Excellence in Theatre, more commonly known as the Tony Award, recognizes achievement in Broadway theatre. The 2015 awards will be presented by the American Theatre Wing and The Broadway League on Sunday, June 7 with co-hosts Kristin Chenoweth and Alan Cumming.


The frontrunner for Best Play is The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime, based on the critically acclaimed novel by Mark Haddon. Director Marianne Elliot has been universally praised for bringing the world of Christopher Boone, a young boy with Asperger's syndrome, to life. Vying in the same category is Wolf Hall, based on the best-selling novel by Hilary Mantel.


An American in Paris, based on the famed movie starring Leslie Caron and Gene Kelly, garnered 12 nominations for Best Musical. Fun Home also received 12 nominations and is based on the graphic novel by Allison Bechdel, which is the autobiographical story of Bechdel’s coming to terms with her sexuality and dysfunctional family. Sit back and imagine yourself on the Great White Way as you check out 2015's Best Musical cast recordings from our collections. Also available for your listening pleasure are the cast recordings for all three of the nominated Best Musical Revivals: On the Town, On the Twentieth Century and the timeless The King and I. Enjoy the show!


Master Thieves

posted by: May 26, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Master ThievesStephen Kurkjian is a man on a mission. The Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist from The Boston Globe revisits what remains the largest property crime in U.S. history in his new book, Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist. It's a detailed accounting of the events, suspects and stalled investigation that has mired Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in a 25-year-old mystery. Perhaps not surprisingly, Kurkjian has his own theories on who-done-it and why, after all these years, the crime remains unsolved.


The FBI’s website calls art theft “stealing history.” Indeed, the 13 stolen works taken in the wee hours  on March 18, 1990 by two men wearing fake mustaches and disguised as police officers represent a distinct and priceless collection by a few of the world's true masters, including Rembrandt, Vermeer, Manet and Degas.


Kurkjian, with his fast-paced narrative and plethora of research, aims to crack this case. There are brief descriptions of all the players at the beginning of the book. Readers will need the list, as Kurkjian lays out a web of who’s who in the Boston underworld, from low level crooks to mob bosses. And just when you think the author is getting repetitive, Kurkjian offers up intriguing bits of the sometimes strange efforts to recover the paintings. He also expresses pointed frustration over the FBI's mishandling of the investigation from the get-go. He notes that there hasn't been a single confirmed sighting of the works. He calls it a "disgrace."


For those who enjoy the logistics of the chase, Master Thieves has plenty to offer to both nonfiction and fiction readers. Written in an accessible journalistic style that includes several interviews with key figures, Kurkjian brings his 20-year obsession to his readers, who will ultimately form their own opinions on why this crime remains unsolved today.



Terry Pratchett, 1948 – 2015

posted by: March 12, 2015 - 1:00pm

Cover art for The Color of MagicImage of Terry Pratchett.Sir Terence David John "Terry" Pratchett, OBE, died today after a long battle with Alzheimer’s disease. The fantasy author is perhaps best known for his beloved Discworld series which began in 1983 with The Color of Magic. His first novel The Carpet People was published in 1971. Pratchett was one of the United Kingdom’s best-selling authors with over 85 million copies of 70 books published worldwide in 37 languages.


Pratchett was appointed Officer of the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 1998. In 2001, he won the annual Carnegie Medal for The Amazing Maurice and his Educated Rodents, the first Discworld book marketed for younger readers. He received the World Fantasy Award for Life Achievement in 2010.


In December 2007, Pratchett announced that he was suffering from early-onset Alzheimer's disease, but continued writing. "The world has lost one of its brightest, sharpest minds," said Larry Finlay of Transworld Publishers. "Terry enriched the planet like few before him. As all who read him know, Discworld was his vehicle to satirize this world: He did so brilliantly, with great skill, enormous humor and constant invention.”



ALA Awards Announced

posted by: February 2, 2015 - 11:30am

The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat The Crossover by Kwame Alexander Firebird by Misty Copeland The most prestigious awards for teen and children's literature were announced by the American Library Association (ALA) in Chicago today. Awards were given in a wide range of categories that covered all formats and age levels. You can find a complete list of awards, winners and honorees on the ALA website.


The Randolph Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. This year’s winner is The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend written and illustrated by Dan Santat. This beautifully illustrated tender tale of one imaginary friend waiting patiently to be picked by a child will captivate young readers with its creative spark.


The oldest of the medals awarded, the John Newbery Medal, is awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. This year’s medal recipient is Kwame Alexander for The Crossover, a novel in verse sharing the coming-of-age story of twins Josh and Jordan and their changing lives on and off the basketball court.


The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit. This year’s winner is I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson, the story of twins (again!) Noah and Jude, their fractured relationship and attempt to recover what they once had.


The Coretta Scott King Awards are given to outstanding African-American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African-American culture and universal human values. Christopher Myers received the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his vibrant collage combinations of paint, paper and photographed elements which bring to life the inspirational story of a budding ballerina in Firebird, written by Misty Copeland. Jacqueline Woodson, already the recipient of the National Book Award, was awarded the Coretta Scott King Author Award for Brown Girl Dreaming, her lyrical novel in verse of her childhood in the 1960s and 1970s.


Check out the winners and honorees at BCPL!



Subscribe to RSS - In the News