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Maeve Binchy, 1940-2012

Maeve Binchy, 1940-2012

posted by:
July 31, 2012 - 9:44am

Light a Penny CandleTara RoadThe world lost a special storyteller yesterday when bestselling Irish author Maeve Binchy died at age 72. Binchy’s literary successes spanned the globe, as more than 40 million copies of her books have sold worldwide. Condolences poured in from readers, including Ireland’s Prime Minister, Enda Kenny, who commented, “We have lost a national treasure.”

 

Binchy wrote sixteen novels beginning with Light a Penny Candle in 1982, which was rejected 5 times before publication. Her most recent novel, Minding Frankie, told the story of a close-knit Dublin community helping raise a motherless baby. Several of her novels, including Circle of Friends were adapted for the big screen. Her work was frequently on the New York Times’ bestseller list and Tara Road was a selection for Oprah’s Book Club.

  

Binchy’s stories transported readers to Irish villages and cities, and introduced memorable characters who dealt with issues of family, friendship, faith, and love. Humor and warmth permeated her writing and brought her readers to a cozy place filled with joy.   

Maureen

 
 

Nancy’s Worlds

Nancy’s Worlds

posted by:
July 31, 2012 - 8:30am

Fountain of Age:StoriesIn her latest collection of short stories, Fountain of Age: Stories, author Nancy Kress offers her readers nine glimpses into futures fantastic, paired with human impulses as old as time.

 

In "End Game" an extraordinarily gifted seventh-grade boy named Allen is carried screaming from math class. He has come to a revelation that will alter the focus of his world and the world of those around him, half a lifetime in the future. In "Images of Anna" photographer Ben is increasingly flummoxed when the glamor portrait shots he takes of his latest client turn out to be anything (and anyone) other than he’d expected. In "Laws of Survival" Jill, a shattered survivor of The War, finds the most unlikely means of healing while trapped aboard an extraterrestrial outpost with 19 dogs. In "By Fools Like Me" Hope’s grandmother grapples with the morality of relinquishing a cache of sinful Pre-Crash artifacts to her society, which is hobbled as much by its ignorance of history as by its fear of repeating it.

 

Kress works in the media of human emotions upon the surfaces of extraordinary situations with the subtlety and skill that Andrew Wyeth once applied egg tempera to panel. The stories contained with Fountain of Age are provocative, mildly disturbing, and at times oddly wistful. They represent a curious blend of styles, at one turn reminiscent of O. Henry, at another, Shirley Jackson, yet in every respect distinctly Kress’ own.

 

Kress is recommended for readers who are short on time but crave well-crafted situational tales capable of fully absorbing the imagination. Those who have already read and enjoyed Fountain of Age may also enjoy Orson Scott Card’s Shadow Puppets.

 

 

Meghan

 
 

To Kill a Carolina Parakeet

To Kill a Carolina Parakeet

posted by:
July 30, 2012 - 8:50am

The CoveAuthor Ron Rash hails from the hills of North Carolina and is the chair of Appalachian studies at Western Carolina University so it is no surprise that his novels are steeped in the culture of the Smoky Mountains. Rash’s star is on the rise; an earlier book, Serena, is being made into a movie starring Jennifer Lawrence and his latest book, The Cove, made the NYT bestsellers list. 

 

In The Cove, Laurel Shelton and her brother Hank live in a gloomy cove outside rural Mars Hill, North Carolina. Their homestead is considered cursed after the untimely deaths of their parents and Laurel, born with a purple birthmark covering her shoulder, is marked as a witch and shunned by the superstitious townspeople. Laurel hopes Hank takes a wife, as a sister-in-law will ease her loneliness. Instead, Laurel finds an injured mute flutist named Walter in the woods and as the Sheltons shelter Walter, a relationship blossoms between the two. At the same time, the Mars Hill residents are infected by the prevailing anti-German sentiment generated by WWI and the hysteria threatens to spill over into the cove even as Laurel begins to suspect Walter of harboring a dangerous secret.

 

Rash’s intimate knowledge of the Appalachian people shines through in this book and he often weaves fact and fiction together. Mars Hill and its college are real, as were the Vaterland cruise ship and the beautiful but hunted to extinction Carolina parakeet. The narrative is rich with colloquial speech, the main characters are well-developed with Laurel especially written well, and the story unfolds in Southern Gothic tradition as a stonecutter quoting Gray’s Elegy says “the paths of glory lead but to the grave.” Readers who appreciate books set in the mountains of the American south might also enjoy author Sharyn McCrumb.

 

Lori

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Love is in the Air

Love is in the Air

posted by:
July 30, 2012 - 8:05am

In the BagTake two single parents, two teenagers, add a European vacation, and some misplaced luggage and you have a delightfully dreamy story: In the Bag by Kate Klise.

 

Daisy is a successful chef who just quit another restaurant. She travels to Paris to clear her head and brings along her daughter, Coco, who is getting ready to graduate from high school. Andrew is on the same flight in order to get to Madrid to oversee the installation of an art exhibit. His teenage son Webb joins him on the trip. Andrew spots Daisy on the flight and is instantly attracted to her. He slips a flirty note in her purse, gives her his email, and asks for a date. Daisy is distinctly unimpressed and fires off a scathing email rejecting Andrew’s offer.

 

Meanwhile, Webb and Coco pick up each other’s bag at the end of the flight. They find each other’s contact information and start an email dalliance. This digital friendship progresses so much that the two arrange for Webb to travel to Paris to pick up his bag and meet Coco in person. Andrew and Daisy are also set to meet the same evening when Daisy is called in as a last-minute caterer for the grand opening of Andrew’s exhibit.   

 

The story unfolds from the unique viewpoints of the four main characters and readers see just how differently men, women, parents, and children think. While working for People magazine, Klise herself was the recipient of a secret admirer note in her carry-on which gave her the spark for this fun trading places story. As a bestselling children and teen author, Klise’s adult debut is a fast-paced, humorous, and romantic gem which will leave readers waiting for a follow-up. 

 

Maureen

 
 

Arrangements Made

Arrangements Made

posted by:
July 27, 2012 - 8:00am

ArrangedBestselling Canadian author Catherine McKenzie’s second novel, Arranged, is now available in the US, and it’s one that chick lit readers will not want to miss.

Anne Shirley Blythe is named after the character from Anne of Green Gables because her mother is obsessed with the series. Anne reasons that because she is named after a romantic heroine, it’s only natural that she would want her own happily ever after. She has a lot of great things going for her. She has good friends and a loving family. She’s a successful writer who is about to have her first book published. Unfortunately, Anne has a history of disastrous relationships. She keeps getting involved with the wrong men, and she begins to see that they are a lot alike. 

 

After another failed relationship, Anne finds a business card for Blythe & Company, which she thinks is a dating service. The card simply says “arrangements made.” When her best friend gets engaged, Anne makes a momentous decision and calls the number on the card. That’s when she learns that Blythe & Company is not a dating service as she had imagined. It’s an arranged marriage service. Anne finds herself going through the process and is soon on her way to a resort in Mexico to marry a man named Jack who she will meet the day before their wedding. That’s just the beginning of the story, though. 

 

What follows is a story about learning the difference between what you think you want and what you truly need. McKenzie has a real talent for creating characters with depth. Arranged is by turns funny, honest, and heartbreaking. Just when you think you know where the story is going, a plot twist changes everything!

 

Beth

 
 

A Cautionary Tale

A Cautionary Tale

posted by:
July 24, 2012 - 8:00am

GetawayIn Getaway by Lisa Brackmann, we meet recently widowed Michelle Mason, at loose ends due to her late husband’s disastrous financial dealings that left her almost penniless. They had a pre-arranged vacation planned in Puerto Vallarta and Michelle decides to head there for a short vacation. One night, she meets a handsome stranger named Daniel and after too many margaritas she invites him to spend the night in her hotel room. By morning, the hotel has been broken into by two masked goons who seem to have a grudge with Daniel. Michelle tries to return home, but a mysterious “package” is planted in her handbag and she is forced to stay in Mexico. She is rescued by Gary, who has some connection to Daniel and appears to be in possession of her passport. Gary forces Michelle into a dangerous game of espionage and it soon becomes apparent that she has no one she can trust. For a widow alone in Mexico, what is a woman to do?

 

Brackmann creates a wonderfully wild and incredibly readable thriller with Getaway. The setting and descriptions of Puerto Vallarta make this a perfect summer read for sitting on a beach or the balcony of a cruise ship. The suspense builds quickly and intensifies to the point where the reader will need to turn the pages quickly to get to the end. Michelle is a likeable heroine, with enough pluck and vigor to be able to weasel out of dire situations. Getaway is great for readers who like to follow a strong female who refuses the role of victim. 

Doug

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Morality Tale

Morality Tale

posted by:
July 23, 2012 - 8:45am

The LifeboatThe relationship between strong leadership and survival in an emergency are at the core of The Lifeboat, the debut novel by Charlotte Rogan. Speaking up, taking a stand, and following through with decisive action are usually recognized as qualities of an effective leader in a crisis situation. However, when the people you lead are adrift at sea on an overcrowded lifeboat, sometimes holding your tongue can be more effective.

 

The Lifeboat begins in a courtroom. Twenty-two-year-old Grace Winter is on trial, along with two other women, for a crime yet to be revealed. The story unfolds as Grace tells it, through alternating narratives of the current trial and her journaling of the three weeks spent in a lifeboat after the sinking of a luxury ocean liner in the Atlantic, two years after the sinking of the Titanic. Thirty-nine people are adrift in the filled-past-capacity boat, and the claustrophobic conditions only add to the mental anguish of the survivors. A power struggle between the sole crew member onboard and a strong-willed female passenger seethes beneath the surface of the group. 

 

All of the usual survival story arcs are at play here—lack of food and water, beating down of the sun, reliance on wind and weather-- but Rogan skillfully pushes these into the background. The true heart of the story is the survival of a sense of society and morality. Initially, the men take charge and make decisions for the group. As the days stretch on without rescue, the balance of power begins to shift. The women, led by the deceptively matron-like Mrs. Grant, soon take matters into their own hands. How will these actions be judged upon rescue?

 

The idea for The Lifeboat came to Rogan from an old criminal court case involving two soldiers who survived a shipwreck and found themselves floating on a plank that would only support one of them. Is it murder to ensure the survival of some rather than the probable death of all? Readers who enjoy survival stories like Jamrach’s Menagerie or psychological dramas like Room will read this in one sitting.  

  

Sam

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Thriller Award Winners Announced

Spiral11/22/63Winners of the 2012 Thriller Awards were recently honored at a gala held by the International Thriller Writers. Recipients included some old favorites as well as some newcomers.

Cornell physics professor Paul McEuen won the award for Best First Novel for his smart new techno-thriller Spiral. When Nobel laureate and nanoscience expert Liam Connor is found dead at the bottom of a gorge, neither his colleague Jake nor his granddaughter Maggie believe that his death was a suicide. They begin to search for answers and find encoded messages from Liam that divulge his secret knowledge of a biological weapon called “Uzumaki” (Japanese for spiral) dating back to World War II. Jake and Maggie must join together to search for the killer and stop a deadly terrorist attack.

 

Stephen King’s 11/22/63 took the award for Best Hard Cover Novel. Jake Epping finds out that the storeroom at a local diner is a portal to 11:58 a.m. on September 9, 1958. Jake agrees to take go back in time to stop the Kennedy assassination to honor a friend’s dying wish. After going back in time, he embarks on a new life as George Amberson in a small Texas town near Dallas and falls in love with a woman named Sadie. As 11/22/63, the date in question, draws closer, Jake races to stop the assassination. Can he really change history?

 

Other honorees included fan favorites Jack Higgins, Ann Rule, and Richard North Patterson. The complete list of winners is available here.

 

Beth

 
 

Beltway Underbelly

Beltway Underbelly

posted by:
July 20, 2012 - 8:00am

The 500Matthew Quirk’s first novel, The 500, refers to the elite men and women who really control Washington D.C. and therefore the world. One man involved with these power players is Mike Ford, a young recent law school graduate. Mike was recruited while at Harvard Law School to join the Davies Group, Washington’s most powerful consulting firm. Mike’s job has him rubbing shoulders with the members of this selective circle which contrasts wildly with his upbringing spent in the realm of small-time con men.

 

As a child, Mike’s father taught him the intrinsic lessons of grifting, identifying marks, and manipulation. Mike wanted out and knew his best chance was through education. Hard work in college and law school was his ticket to the straight and narrow – or so he thought. He soon learns that crooks transcend social strata and becomes embroiled in a high stakes con game. As Mike ascends the Davies Group’s hierarchy, he gradually realizes that his employer is supporting a sinister political conspiracy. 

 

This thrilling debut offers political intrigue, fast-paced action, humor, and a likeable and strong leading man. As a former reporter for Atlantic Magazine, Quirk nails the details of the politics and setting of Washington D.C. and is being hailed as the next John Grisham. The 500 will have international appeal as it has already been translated into twenty languages and Quirk is hard at work on a sequel. Additionally, movie rights were sold just days after the book, so put your casting cap on as you read this potential future blockbuster!

 

Maureen

 
 

An Aching Howl

An Aching Howl

posted by:
July 17, 2012 - 7:00am

Tell the Wolves I'm HomeFragile tendrils of emotion swirl together in an attempt to mend the brokenhearted in Carol Rifka Brunt’s stirring debut, Tell the Wolves I’m Home. Set in mid-1980s New York, this coming of age story unfolds against a burgeoning AIDS epidemic and a teenager’s tender awakening to love, loss, and acceptance.

 

June Elbus is a shy, medieval history-loving fourteen-year-old who likes to dress up and retreat to the woods to escape reality. When her beloved uncle, the renowned artist Finn Weiss, dies from AIDS, June is devastated.  Her preoccupied parents prefer not to discuss the reasons he ended up with the illness. Her mother regrets her own missed opportunities at being an artist, while her father seeks simply to keep the family peace. June and her older sister, once inseparable, are now estranged. Even Finn's final gift, a portrait of June and Greta titled "Tell the Wolves I'm Home," turns out to be as complex as the sisters' relationship.

 

Vulnerable and grieving, June begins meeting secretly with her uncle's partner, Toby. Their tentative relationship, eked out of neediness and curiosity in the beginning, evolves into a heartfelt friendship that leads each to understand better the man they both loved, whether or not that love was appropriate. Soul searching never comes without revelations, and Toby and June are confronted with the reality that one never truly belongs to any one person.

 

In June's voice, Brunt lays bare her characters, including Finn, who even in death remains the catalyst for what lies ahead.  An emotionally wrought, thoughtfully rendered work that tackles the issues of the day - AIDS and forbidden relationships, Brunt's story reaches into a reservoir of understanding and compassion that is the ultimate requiem for a loved one.

 

Cynthia

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