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To Catch a Thief

To Catch a Thief

posted by:
March 29, 2013 - 6:01am

The Bughouse AffairTravel to San Francisco, 1894 to meet a pair of delightful detectives in The Bughouse Affair by Marcia Muller and Bill Pronzini. This first in a new historical mystery series by two Grand Master Award winners (who just happen to be married), introduces partners Sabina Carpenter and John Quincannon. Sabina is a former Pinkerton operative and John honed his skills in the Secret Service. The two combined forces to establish a successful agency in the quickly developing city of San Francisco. Sabina is widowed and dedicated to her job, and John is a bachelor hoping for a more personal relationship with his lovely partner.

 

The two are working on separate cases while also following press reports of the resurrection of Sherlock Holmes, who has miraculously returned to life and picked San Francisco as his new base of operations. Sabina’s case involves the hunt for a slippery lady pickpocket who finds her marks at a large amusement park and other crowded venues. Quincannon is on the trail of a burglar who is targeting the homes of wealthy residents. He finds himself traveling to seedy bars and parlors in the disreputable Barbary Coast while tracking his elusive thief. Eventually, the two realize their cases are connected and the criminals have stepped up their game to include murder. The detecting duo find themselves working feverishly to capture these lawbreakers before additional crimes can be committed, all while dealing with the Sherlock Holmes pretender who has become a surprising rival.

 

Muller and Pronzini have both entertained readers with their memorable characters Sharon McCone and The Nameless Detective respectively. With this series, this talented couple offers two intrepid detectives in an intriguing historical setting. Readers will be anxious to follow the next case these two embark upon and curious about whether the romantic sparks will continue to fly.   

Maureen

 
 

Hold On

Hold On

posted by:
March 25, 2013 - 7:05am

Dear LifeAlice Munro is often described as “one of the best living writers of short stories in the English language”. While that may be said to avoid too many comparisons as to who is truly the best, the qualifiers are really not necessary. This is proven with her latest collection, Dear Life. In interviews, Munro states that a few of this set of stories are her most autobiographical.

 

One of the most striking aspects of Munro’s stories is the misdirection she frequently provides. Just as the reader is settling in on what is believed to be the main character or main idea of a story, a tangent takes one off into a myriad of different directions. Often taking place in the area Munro knows best, rural Ontario near Lake Huron, these are mostly slice-of-life stories about regular people. In “Haven”, for example, a young girl goes to live with her aunt and uncle, two very different people from her missionary parents. Her eyes are opened to another way of life, and her childhood ends. Another story, “Pride”, describes two small-town misfits who eventually forge an uneasy friendship. The male protagonist explains his female acquaintance as having a “strange hesitation and lightness about her, as if she were waiting for life to begin. She went away on trips of course, and maybe she thought it would begin there. No such luck.”

 

The author tucks those sorts of breathtaking lines throughout the fourteen stories. Travel, especially by train, takes on a large role, likely a metaphor for our lifelong journeys. The final, titular story, certainly one of the most autobiographical, has many interwoven themes. But above all, the wordplay of Munro’s own dear life, while she has witnessed so many holding on for dear life, leaves readers in awe of her writing powers.

 

Todd

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One Tough Broad

One Tough Broad

posted by:
March 25, 2013 - 6:45am

Rage Against the DyingIn Becky Masterman’s chilling debut thriller Rage Against the Dying, heroine Brigid Quinn spent her FBI career hunting the worst sexual predators. She is tough and self-reliant. After Brigid was forced to take early retirement from the FBI, she left that world behind entirely. Now, she now lives a quiet life with her new husband Carlo and their two pugs. Former priest Carlo knows little about that life or the person Brigid was before they met. Everything changes when Brigid’s past comes crashing into her present. A man named Floyd Lynch is arrested, and he confesses to being the Route 66 Killer. That case was one of the worst of Brigid’s career, resulting in the disappearance of her protégé Jessica. Lynch knows some key details that were never publicized, and he leads authorities to Jessica’s mummified remains. However, Brigid has reason to believe that his confession is false. Soon, Brigid realizes that she is being stalked, and she must find the killer to save herself.

 

Rage Against the Dying, which Masterman originally titled One Tough Broad, brings an exciting new character to the thriller world. Masterman says that her debut novel is “in some respects like a coming-of-age novel for an older woman.” Although 59-year-old Brigid is very confident in her strength and abilities, she is still learning about being a wife and friend. Masterman, whose previous career was in forensic textbook publishing, brings a level of realism to the brutal crimes that Brigid has seen. Rage Against the Dying is the kind of thriller that keeps readers up late at night and might make them sleep with the lights on.  

 

Beth

 
 

Chinua Achebe, 1930-2013

Things Fall ApartThere Was a CountryHow the Leopard Got His ClawsThe renowned author of African literature, Chinua Achebe, has died in Boston at the age of 82. He is best-known for his seminal 1958 novel Things Fall Apart, read by millions worldwide, and featured in the curriculum and reading lists of countless high schools and universities. This novel follows the life of Okonkwo, a proud Igbo man living in turn of the 19th century Nigeria, and the cultural changes that he must face and accept as British colonialism takes hold of the area and the only life he knows. Achebe also wrote a number of follow-up novels to this groundbreaking story. Confined to a wheelchair for the past twenty years following a car accident, he lived in the United States for the last two decades of his life, and was a professor of African Studies at Brown University in Providence.

 

Achebe also was a strong proponent of the rights of the people living in the once-breakaway Nigerian state of Biafra. His book There Was A Country: A Personal History of Biafra was published last year. Explaining the Nigerian civil war that took place in the late 1960s, this mélange of memoir and history reminded the world of an oft-forgotten war. Achebe also wrote an allegorical folktale which was republished last year with Mary GrandPré's illustrations. How the Leopard Got His Claws tells the story of a short-lived coup and the resulting return of the original power players, in terms that are understandable for all ages.

Todd

 
 

Going off the Grid

Going off the Grid

posted by:
March 22, 2013 - 6:45am

GhostmanIn his first novel, Ghostman, Roger Hobbs creates an exciting world of double dealing, casino heists, crime bosses and an intriguing main character caught in the middle. The Ghostman goes by many aliases and stays separate from the rest of the world. He is careful not to live in one location for very long, has no close associates, and doesn’t maintain a phone line or a personal email. He refuses to use his real name, but when a message comes to him for the persona Jack Delton, he knows that someone is contacting him to collect a debt. Years ago, the Ghostman made a fatal error during a heist in Kuala Lumpur, and Marcus, the mastermind of the heist, was sent to prison. Now Marcus has discovered a way to contact the Ghostman and he demands to be repaid with a very dangerous proposition involving stolen money from an Atlantic City casino. The money was newly printed by the Federal Reserve and contained a dye pack that will explode within the next two days. Marcus needs to find the thief and the cash, and contacts Ghostman with the general schematics of the plan. But plans with criminals can easily go awry, and soon our hapless anti-hero attracts the attention of a crime boss known at the Wolf as well as a rather tenacious FBI agent.  It will take a great deal of nerve and every trick at his disposal in order to come out alive.

 

The story is fast-paced and exciting. It unfolds in present day Atlantic City with the current plan of action, but interspersed are chapters told in flashback and the reader learns the history behind Ghostman’s debt to Marcus. Ghostman is a fantastic thriller that looks into the heart of the criminal world and examines what it takes to survive in such a hostile environment. Roger Hobbs is a new writer to watch, and is sure to please fans of nail-biting suspense.

Doug

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Haunted by the Past

Haunted by the Past

posted by:
March 18, 2013 - 6:45am

A Killer in the WindDan Champion was an undercover cop with the NYPD, on fire with ambition and with no regard for overtime caps or departmental boundaries. While combing through old case files, he discovers references to the “Fat Woman,” a mysterious, legendary monster, responsible for countless human trafficking purchases and subsequent murders. His obsession with finding her and the consequences of this personal mission are the driving force of A Killer in the Wind by Andrew Klavan.

 

A sting operation Champion has arranged to bring down the Fat Woman falls apart, resulting in the loss of his job and exile to a sheriff’s office in rural New York State. During his pursuit of the Fat Woman he took a street drug as a sleep aid, and he has since been haunted by ghosts and hallucinations. These visions raise many disturbing questions for Champion. How does he know the ghost boy’s name is Alexander? Why is the woman in his vision so familiar that he believes he could be in love with her? His life is turned upside down when a woman’s body pulled from the river turns out to be the very woman from his visions. The only words she utters before falling unconscious are “They are coming for us.”

 

Klavan is an international best-selling author, gifted in writing all things action and adventure. A Killer in the Wind is fast-moving and adrenaline-charged as the author utilizes bursts of short sentences and strategically placed repetition to create an effect that propels the story forward by matching pace with the action. This adult thriller is just a step darker than his teen series The Homelanders, the first of which has been optioned as a feature film. In both cases, he proves to be masterful at sweeping readers up in a mysterious suspense-filled novel and taking them on a wild ride to the stunning conclusion. 

 

Jeanne

 
 

The Nature of Harm

The Nature of Harm

posted by:
March 15, 2013 - 7:03am

The House GirlLawyer Lina Sparrow instantly knew she was staring at a drawing that transcended time. The young African American man at its center stood in a Virginia field with his hands at his side, waiting. More than 150 years may have passed, but Lina knew that the charcoal put to paper that day said as much about the subject as it did about the artist who created it. In Tara Conklin's shifting, stirring debut, The House Girl, two worlds coalesce, as the winds of past sins expose the fight for freedom and family identity that reach from present day deep into America's past.

 

In the plush law offices of Manhattan’s prestigious Clifton & Harp, first year litigation associate, Lina Sparrow, has just been handed the class action case of a lifetime involving historic reparations for slavery.  In locating a slave's descendant to act as lead plaintiff, she stumbles upon the story of artist Lu Anne Bell and her house girl, Josephine, who sometimes painted alongside her mistress. Josephine was seventeen in 1852 when she escaped from the failing Bell tobacco plantation. Now Mrs. Bell’s paintings are highly regarded for their sensitive portrayal of her husband's slaves, but recent speculation has questioned their authenticity. Lina, herself the daughter of artists, delves deeper into the searing plight of Josephine. In doing so, she begins to question her personal life and her own sense of place.

 

Conklin, a lawyer by training, exploits the double narrative as the means to weave together a historic time period with the legal perspective of twenty-first century restitution. As the prose expands, uncovered correspondences lay bare the horror of slavery. Readers of The Help by Kathryn Stockett and Mrs. Lincoln's Dressmaker by Jennifer Chiaverini  will enjoy this moving connection to the troubled past.

Cynthia

 
 

Time, the Final Frontier

Time, the Final Frontier

posted by:
March 11, 2013 - 7:10am

Man in the Empty SuitIf you had the chance to change an event in your life, would you? What if that change meant uncertainty, loneliness, and possibly death? The time traveler in Sean Ferrell’s new novel, Man in the Empty Suit, becomes intimately acquainted with the chaotic, frightening, and liberating repercussions of seizing your destiny and altering your fate.

 

Ever since he discovered his ability, the time traveler has been jaunting along in time with no discernible mission other than exploring the ages for his own amusement. The only true continuity in his life comes from the party he attends each year on his birthday, where he mingles with all his other selves from other years. There is the Inventor, who first travels through time and initially sets up the party, the other Youngsters, who are younger than his current self, and the Elders, who are older and more knowing. He is surrounded by himself, and each year the party progresses in exactly the same way with each version playing the same role and saying the same lines as before to avoid breaking continuity with each other and altering the proscribed timeline. But the year he turns 39, events do not proceed as usual. Due to a single missed action, versions start ending up dead, memories the Elders have are disconnected from the current reality, and a mysterious woman named Lily appears at the party for the first time. It is the time traveler’s job to set things right, but will he choose to return events to their original path or to forge a new destiny for himself?

 

This gripping, surreal story is full of emotional tension and psychological drama. Fans of time travel fiction, science fiction, and Stephen King’s 11/22/63 will find this unusual and offbeat novel a compelling and thought-provoking read.

 

Rachael

 
 

Hair of the Dog

Hair of the Dog

posted by:
March 11, 2013 - 6:45am

The Good HouseAnn Leary introduces us to a delightful, if not slightly tragic, character in her novel The Good House. Hildy Good lives in a historic community on Boston’s North Shore, where she works as a rather successful independent real estate broker. She is the descendant of famed Massachusetts witch Sarah Good, and is often reputed to having psychic abilities.  Hildy vehemently denies this, however. The abilities she possesses lie only in her ability to read body language and facial cues, and she can often get her friends and relatives to reveal secrets best kept hidden.

  

But Hildy harbors her own secret. Recently, her daughters staged an intervention and forced her to confront her drinking. Hildy agrees to spend a month in Hazelden, if only to appease her children. But Hildy believes that drinking is hard liquor, and not the occasional bottle of wine. Hildy soon becomes adept at abstaining at social occasions, opting to secretly sip from the nectar while at home. All the while, Hildy is still working hard to sell properties and attract new clients. She becomes involved in the lives of some of the quirky residents of the town and soon secrets are revealed to her about their complicated lives. But it could be very worrisome to reveal your secrets to the town alcoholic. The Good House is an incredible novel told from Hildy’s point of view. She narrates her tale, and is a somewhat unreliable narrator because her perspective is often skewed by drink.  The audio version of the book is read by the talented actress Mary Beth Hurt, and she provides a striking voice for Hildy that makes the audio a joy to listen to. The Good House is a wonderful character study and will be enjoyed by individual readers and book groups alike.

 

Doug

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The Precious Ordinary

The Precious Ordinary

posted by:
March 8, 2013 - 7:01am

BenedictionArtist Grant Wood’s work evokes the essence of the Midwestern United States, especially as depicted in his iconic painting American Gothic. Wood’s equivalent in the literary world must surely be Kent Haruf, who conjures up the same quiet and steadfast spirit in his novels of small town living. In his newest book, Benediction, Haruf once again uses the fictional setting of rural Holt, Colorado.

 

Old “Dad” Lewis is dying. A fixture in Holt, he has owned the downtown hardware store since he was a young man, and has been married to Mary for just as long. Mary and Dad notify their middle-aged daughter Lorraine of her father’s terminal illness, and Lorraine returns to her childhood home to help and support her mother as they care for Dad in his final weeks. As Dad deteriorates, Lorraine and Mary must figure out a new footing for their own relationship as well as determine how Dad’s death will figure on their future. The descriptions of the matter-of-fact yet tender care Mary provides for Dad as he becomes increasingly incapacitated are a beautiful testament to the deep love between the couple.

 

Haruf has two themes running through Benediction. Not surprisingly, one involves Dad’s reflections on his past, with an emphasis on choices made by Dad in pivotal circumstances. Dad ruminates on wayward son Frank who broke contact with his parents years ago; the widow of a former hardware store employee discovered by Dad to be embezzling funds; and Dad’s own hardscrabble parents who never met their grandchildren. At the same time, Haruf highlights different kinds of love found in daily life, including platonic love between friends, erotic love stemming from passion, and unconditional love between man and God. As a disgraced preacher in the story explains, it is the ordinary life of good people which is most precious and Haruf illustrates this tenet perfectly with his spare prose.

Lori

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