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The First Wives Club

The First Wives Club

posted by:
August 6, 2013 - 1:09pm

Ladies' Night Mary Kay AndrewsThe Last Original Wife Dorothea Benton Frank

They say that living well is the best revenge, and these hot new beach reads are stories of women who rebuild their lives after their marriages end. Ladies’ Night by Mary Kay Andrews is a rollicking story about a woman who starts over. When popular lifestyle blogger Grace Stanton catches her husband cheating, she retaliates by parking his Audi in the pool. That is the beginning of the end of Grace’s life as she knows it. She soon finds that she no longer has access to either her money or her blog, and she is forced to move in with her mother. While she begins to rebuild her life, Grace attends court-mandated therapy sessions until she and her therapy group ditch their “divorce coach” and begin meeting for their own "Ladies’ Night" at The Sandbox - Grace’s mother’s bar. Mary Kay Andrews is known for her laugh-out-loud funny stories, and Ladies’ Night is no exception.

 

Leslie Carter is a woman on a mission in Dorothea Benton Frank’s funny and relatable new novel The Last Original Wife. Among her husband Wesley’s circle of friends, Les is the last original wife. Over the years, all of Wes’s friends have traded in their first wives for newer models, leaving Les feeling lonely and adrift in their social set. Yes, Les and Wes have drifted apart over time, but they take pride in the fact that they are still married. Everything changes for Les when she falls into an open manhole and no one notices that she’s missing. Is this really the life that she is living? Les becomes fed up with her life and becomes determined to do whatever it takes to be the strong, vibrant woman she wants to be. Frank’s humor and warmth make The Last Original Wife a winner.

 

Beth

categories:

 
 

How the West Was Really Won

The Son cover imagePhilipp Meyer’s new novel spanning nearly 200 years of the American West, The Son, opens with the transcription of a 1934 New Deal WPA recording of 100-year-old Eli McCullough’s reminiscences. Eli, also known as the Colonel, discusses his imminent death: in one breath, comparing himself to Alexander the Great and, in the next, dismissing women and marriage. From vests fashioned of scalps, Aztecs as “mincing choirboys,” and vaqueros to Texas rangers, ranchers and oil wells, the Colonel has seen it all and is not shy about sharing his opinions.
 

Meyer alternates narrators and timeframes by chapter, giving voice to Eli as well as to his son Peter and Peter’s granddaughter, Jeanne. Born in 1834, the same year in which Texas gained its independence from Mexico, Eli’s story is the backbone of the book. As a boy, he witnesses the brutal slaughter of his mother, brother and sister by a band of Comanche who take Eli captive and eventually incorporate him as a member of their tribe. Eli’s later choices reflect his determination to survive despite the torturous customs of his captors. His conduct also mirrors the rapacious actions of a government and its people relentlessly expanding westward into territory already occupied. The Colonel has a contentious relationship with his son Peter, whose chapters play the role of a conscience, ruminating on injustice and cruelty. As the only descendent of the Colonel interested in taking over the family legacies of ranching and oil, great-granddaughter Jeanne reflects on her struggles as a woman managing a vast business in a Texas-style man’s world.
 

Jeanne muses, “the blood that ran through history would fill every river and ocean…” The Son dispassionately recounts the barbarous atrocities committed by settlers and natives alike. Like the western novels of Larry McMurtry or Cormac McCarthy, Meyer’s writing is notable for its lack of romanticism about its subject. Meyer, who grew up in Baltimore’s Hampden neighborhood, has written a family saga packed with adventure and drama in which the sins of all the fathers have consequences reverberating down through generations.   

Lori

 
 

A Cold War Friendship

A Cold War Friendship

posted by:
August 1, 2013 - 7:00am

You Are One of Them Cover ArtYou Are One of Them is Elliot Holt’s new coming-of-age novel, a story of two neighbors who become best friends at the height of the Cold War during the 1980s. Sarah Zukerman and Jenny Jones are best friends growing up in a Washington, D.C. suburb and doing everything together. Out of boredom on a rainy afternoon, they decide to write a letter to Yuri Andropov, the secretary general of the Soviet Union’s Communist party. They are children of the Cold War and afraid of nuclear war. They hope that Andropov will understand that regular Americans just want to live in peace.
 

Andropov actually decides to answer Jenny’s letter and a media sensation is born. Jenny and her parents are invited to the Soviet Union. She becomes a poster child for peace at a time when the US and USSR seem only to be obsessed with nuclear brinkmanship. Due to a possible betrayal by Jenny, the girls' friendship never quite recovers once Jenny's family returns to the US. Jenny and her family remain media sensations, taking publicity trips all over the country. One of the trip ends in plane crash, killing the entire Jones family.
 

Fast-forward 10 years: Sarah receives a mysterious email from a young Russian woman who suggests that maybe Jenny’s family did not really die in the crash. Maybe Jenny is still alive and living in Russia. The Russian reminds Sarah that Americans cannot believe everything they’re told by the media. Sarah decides to find out once and for all. She goes to Russia to find her friend — and maybe herself.
 

Holt has successfully blended the '80s setting and D.C. locale to create an acutely realistic coming-of-age story. The period details are spot-on without obscuring the overall story. This book is also a riveting spy tale, but one with reflection and depth.
 

Also, highly recommended on audiobook.

Zeke

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Underground Clairvoyant Syndicate

The Bone Season cover image“Is Samantha Shannon the next J.K. Rowling?” That's the question asked in the July 15th edition of Forbes magazine. Shannon’s debut novel, The Bone Season, is the first in what's expected to be a seven-part series. The novel begins in an alternate universe in the year 2059, about 200 years after a plague covered the planet causing some of the population to become clairvoyant. In the world Shannon has created, there are guards who protect the Scion city of London from clairvoyants because the general population has been told that clairvoyants are dangerous. This futuristic world is a totalitarian society where clairvoyants have to hide their abilities and are treated as criminals.
 

Paige Mahoney is the 19-year-old protagonist of this science fiction thriller. She is called the "Pale Dreamer" because she’s a dream walker, a rare form of clairvoyant. All clairvoyants have a specialty, an area of the sixth sense at which they excel, and Paige’s spirit is able to leave her body and travel into the aether to visit the thoughts and dreams of others. She uses her gift for an underground crime syndicate that employs clairvoyants in a variety of ways depending on their abilities. The lifestyle allows Paige to be around others like her and not feel ashamed of her gifts.
 

The Pale Dreamer’s world is thrown into chaos when underguards discover that she is clairvoyant. She is taken captive and detained with others who have similar abilities. She must learn about herself and her gift in order to regain her freedom, but the task is greater than it seems and failing isn’t an option.
 

This is an incredibly unique book by a debut author. According to The Bone Season’s website, the book’s movie rights have already been claimed by The Imaginarium studios.

Randalee

 
 

Agatha’s Greatest Hits

Agatha’s Greatest Hits

posted by:
July 31, 2013 - 7:00am

Elephants Can Remember cover imageCurtain image coverFans of Agatha Christie have much to rejoice this year, as the final five Poirot novels adapted to films by the BBC have been completed and will air in the United States later this year. David Suchet has been playing Poirot since 1989 and, in the end, will have filmed 70 episodes, including several full-length movies featuring Christie’s well-know Belgian detective.

 

The final films include Elephants Can Remember, based on a novel featuring Christie’s delightful recurring character, mystery novelist Ariadne Oliver. Ariadne’s goddaughter Celia’s life is shrouded in mystery as Celia's parents perished in an apparent double suicide. There could be more to the story, and as Ariadne begins to dig, she will need the help of Hercule Poirot to get to the bottom of the case.   

 

The final film will, of course, be based on Christie’s last Poirot novel, Curtain. Christie wrote Curtain in the 1940’s to give closure to the Poirot series, and the novel was locked in a bank vault and never published until after her death in the 1970s. Poirot is ailing and his body is beginning to break down, even though his mind is as sharp as ever.  He returns with Captain Hastings to the scene of their first mystery together with concerns of his own. He will have to use Captain Hastings as his eyes and ears to find a devious killer who may have acted more than once in committing horrible crimes.

 

The final films will be bittersweet, as fans always had that next film or episode to look forward to, but now is a great time to brush up on your Christie and read the words that inspired the movies.

Doug

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Mother Knows Best

Mother Knows Best

posted by:
July 30, 2013 - 8:00am

The Life List cover imageIn Lori Nelson Spielman’s charming debut novel The Life List, Brett Bohlinger embarks on an unexpected year-long adventure that changes the trajectory of her life.
 

Brett thinks that she is happy with her life. She has a good job, a handsome boyfriend and a loving family. Brett’s world is rocked by the death of her beloved mother Elizabeth. Devastated and grieving, Brett is even more shocked when her mother’s will is read. Instead of bequeathing the family’s cosmetics business to Brett, Elizabeth has set an astonishing plan in motion. The terms of Elizabeth’s will stipulate that Brett has one year to earn her inheritance by completing a list of life goals that she set for herself when she was 14 years old. Each time she completes a task, Brett not only gets closer to her inheritance, she also earns a letter from her mother. Some of the tasks, like performing on stage or getting a dog, are fairly easy to complete. Others, like having a baby and having a good relationship with her father, seem impossible to Brett. As she works her way through the list, Brett begins to find her way, and the tasks her mother assigned her prove that her mother did indeed know best.
 

Brett’s journey is filled with heart and warm humor. In the end, she finds the true loves of her life just as Elizabeth hoped she would. Lori Nelson Spielman is an exciting new voice in women’s fiction.  Readers who enjoy novels by Allison Winn Scotch, Marian Keyes and Emily Giffin will love The Life List.

Beth

categories:

 
 

There’s Something About Zelda

Z Cover ImageShe was the quintessential southern belle who married a reckless young writer, took New York by storm and became the embodiment of the Roaring Twenties’ flapper. In Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald, Therese Anne Fowler envisions the dramatic, heartfelt life of Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald, working through the entanglement of images, rumors and speculations which have been tied to this intriguing woman since her introduction into New York’s and Europe’s artisan circles over 90 years ago. What emerges is a portrait of a young woman full of life, an Alabama transplant with quick wit and plenty of sass.

 

Through the modern-day lens Fowler applies to her writing, Zelda’s challenges, including her battle with mental illness and her supposed unhealthy obsession with ballet, are reexamined. Fowler also highlights what is often overlooked — Zelda herself was an accomplished writer, even penning a review of her husband F. Scott’s second novel, The Beautiful and the Damned, but much of her writing was overshadowed or published jointly with his name, so as to make it more acceptable with editors of the time.
 
Zelda and F. Scott have remained intriguing, due in large part to their fast rise to fame, nomadic existence and self-destructive downfall. Readers will appreciate this insightful reconstruction of their lives during the heyday of the 1920s. Fans of Fitzgerald’s novels will also see bits of the couple’s lives and conversation which were later incorporated into his stories. Z is the latest in a string of historical fiction about wives of famous men, including The Aviator’s Wife and The Paris Wife, and this lively tale would make an excellent travel companion or book club pick.

Melanie

 
 

Love's Labor

Love's Labor

posted by:
July 26, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Close My EyesAnguish over the loss of a child is life altering and permanent. Just suppose, years later, a stranger tells you that your child may still be alive. That unimaginable scenario greets Geniver (Gen) Loxley in Sophie McKenzie’s tightly wound new thriller Close My Eyes, where the still grieving mother's encounter with an unexpected visitor leads to an unthinkable possibility.

 

After eight long years, life is standing still for the childless Gen.  Despite a comfortable, albeit boring, life with her ambitious and devoted husband Art, the former writer and part-time teacher can't seem to move past the death of her stillborn daughter, Beth. When Gen's husband suggests they keep trying for another child his sullen wife resists. Then one day out of the blue, a woman appears at their door with an incredible accusation: the Loxley baby was born alive and healthy. For the fragile Gen, it is about as cruel a joke as possible. Her emotional unraveling worries her husband and her best friend, both of whom dismiss outright the stranger's claims.  When one coincidence too many does not add up, Gen plummets into a wave of confusion and doubt. What really did happen in the operating room years earlier? It is true; she never saw her dead daughter. As she sets out to revisit the past she discovers an equally devastating reality may await her.

 

The London-born McKenzie, whose previous works included children and teen novels published in the United Kingdom, has crafted a roller coaster plot with flawed characters and a disturbing narrative. Fans of last summer's mega-hit Gone Girl will be hooked by another enticing and twisty psychological thriller that visits a dark place with unsettling consequences. It is not likely to disappoint.

Cynthia

 
 

Victorian Violence

Victorian Violence

posted by:
July 26, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Murder as a Fine ArtLove learning new things while also reading a page-turning historical thriller? Check out David Morrell’s Murder as a Fine Art.  Set in Victorian England, Morrell’s “hero” is the essayist Thomas De Quincey, author of Confessions of an Opium Eater.

 

A heinous crime is committed in 1854, England. The gruesome methods of the crime are lifted directly from a De Quincey essay, “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.” As it happens, De Quincey and his daughter Emily were in England at the time of the murder. He suddenly becomes a prime suspect. With the help of a couple of Scotland Yard detectives, it will be up to De Quincey and Emily to prove his innocence and find the killer.

 

De Quincey is a fascinating historical figure. He wrote about the inner psyche decades before Sigmund Freud and was surrounded by artistic friends such as William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

 

Murder as a Fine Art is one part novel and one part history lesson. Scotland Yard was still relatively new, and investigative techniques were still rather primitive. Morrell gives his readers a real sense of Victorian England, with its straight-laced exterior hiding a dark underbelly of vice.

 

For additional historical thrillers set in the Victorian era, check out The Alienist by Caleb Carr and Alex Grecian’s The Yard. For an excellent nonfiction treatment of crime in the Victorian era, see Kate Summerscale’s The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective.
 

Zeke

 
 

The Sexiest Man Alive

The Sexiest Man Alive

posted by:
July 25, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Finding Colin FirthCover art for AustenlandColin Firth will always be treasured by legions of devoted fans that cherish his portrayal of Mr. Darcy in the BBC miniseries production of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. For those who can’t get enough of the fabulous Firth, he is prominently featured in two charming books.

 

Three women are hoping for a meeting with the man behind Mr. Darcy in Finding Colin Firth by Mia March. The quaint tourist town of Boothbay Harbor, Maine is abuzz with the rumor that Colin Firth is coming to film. Three female residents are each determined to meet the man. Gemma lost her job and left her husband, but becomes convinced that an interview with Colin Firth will put her life back on track. Twenty-two year old Bea just learned that she was adopted as a baby and travels to Maine to spy on her biological mother. That woman, Veronica, is a waitress and local legend known for her healing pies. As their stories unfold in alternating chapters, readers will enjoy the quest for Colin and the dramatic life changes experienced by each of these delightful women.

 

In Austenland by Shannon Hale, Jane Hayes is single, with a dead end job, and a past littered with hapless boyfriends. Part of the problem is her secret obsession with Mr. Darcy, as played by the inimitable Colin Firth. When she is bequeathed at trip to Pembrook Park, a fantasy camp for Austen fans, she jumps at the chance to spend three weeks as a Regency lady. She enjoys the garb and manners, as well as flirtations with both a gentleman and the gardener. Will she finally find a Mr. Darcy of her very own? Readers will be thrilled to know that Jane’s story will soon be on the big screen starring Keri Russell, and that Pembrook Park is the setting for Hale’s follow-up, Midnight in Austenland, featuring another fun and feisty fan of Austen.

Maureen