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The Third Wife

The Third Wife

posted by:
July 13, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Third Wife by Lisa JewellLisa Jewell’s riveting family drama The Third Wife unravels the layers of a seemingly cohesive blended family to reveal emotional scars and disquieting truths, all while delivering an authentic tale complete with love, loss and renewal. Jojo Moyes raves that this remarkable new novel is “Clever, intelligent . . . wonderful.”

 

At 48, Adrian Wolfe’s life is ideal. He is married to the much younger Maya who is perfectly at home in his world which consists of two ex-wives and five children. Maya’s calm spirit and amenable attitude mask a different reality which comes to a head when she can’t cope any more, gets plastered and is killed when she steps in front of a bus. Circumstances indicate that it was just a tragic accident, but a string of events a year after her death prompt Adrian to investigate what really happened.

 

First, Jane, an attractive stranger, begins appearing wherever Adrian and his family are. Then a series of vitriolic emails directed to Maya are unearthed and Adrian vows to uncover what really happened to his wife. As he uncovers more facts, he tries to avoid the real truth that his marriage was not a happy one and his family is not perfect. Jewell successfully manages to present multiple perspectives, including Maya’s, which allows the reader to see the other side of the Wolfe family, the unpleasant reality which Adrian ignored in an effort to make himself feel at peace with his abandonments. The characters are sharply written and the quick pace will keep you turning the page as revelations from the past affect the present all while creating an honest portrayal of a real modern family.

Maureen

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Go Set a Watchman

Go Set a Watchman

posted by:
July 10, 2015 - 10:00am

Cover art for Go Set a Watchman

Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, set for publication on July 14, is one of the most anticipated books in recent memory. Publisher Harper Collins has said that pre-orders for this novel are the highest in company history. The book has been closely guarded, but now a few details are being revealed with both The Wall Street Journal and The Guardian previewing the first chapter available here. If you want to get a taste of Reese Witherspoon’s narration of the audio book, here’s a sneak listen to the first chapter.

 

Lee’s second novel takes place in the 1950s, 20 years after her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel To Kill a Mockingbird, and opens with Scout returning by train to Maycomb, Alabama. Lee has said the novel did not undergo any revisions since she completed the manuscript in the 1950s and is “humbled and amazed that this will now be published after all these years.”

 

Learn more about this big event, including a preview of PBS’ Thirteen Days of Harper Lee, on BCPL’s tumblr, and be sure to check back for a Between the Covers post about the novel soon!

Maureen

 
 

Thin Air

Thin Air

posted by:
July 10, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Thin Air by Ann CleevesUniversity chums meet to celebrate the wedding of one of their friends in Ann Cleeves’ Thin Air. Lowrie and Caroline want to start married life in the Scottish tradition, with a hamefarin’ on the most northerly Shetland Island of Unst. After the bridal march, friends of the bride and groom serve the celebration supper. It’s a time of joyous celebration, of new beginnings and old friends. That is, until Eleanor disappears, and Polly receives a text message, “Don’t bother looking for me. You won’t find me alive.”

 

Detectives Jimmy Perez and Willow Reeves investigate. They discover that Eleanor was desperate to have a child and had lost a baby late in her pregnancy. Before she disappeared, Eleanor claimed to see the ghost of a local child who drowned in the 1920s. Did Eleanor commit suicide? What is the meaning of the apparition? Is the mystery of the child’s death linked to Eleanor’s disappearance?

 

We become a part of the old college crowd, living through the evolution of their relationships and their personal development from students to adults in a competitive world. We are privy to the maturation of the investigative team as well, as they resolve personal as well as professional challenges. Through it all, Cleeves’ tale has as many twists and turns as the cliff paths on the Shetland Islands. The stark remoteness of the Shetland landscape hints at undercurrents that ebb and flow with the tide.

 

Ann Cleeves’ body of work has been long-listed for the Crime Writers Association’s Dagger in the Library Award. This is the 6th entry in the Jimmy Perez series. The other titles are Raven Black, White Nights, Red Bones, Blue Lightning and Silent Voices. Her Jimmy Perez and Vera Stanehope characters are the basis of the television series Shetland. Fans of Peter Robinson, Elizabeth George and Stephen Booth will find a deeply satisfying mystery with an ending you won’t see coming.

Leanne

 
 

Eight Hundred Grapes

Eight Hundred Grapes

posted by:
July 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura DaveEight Hundred Grapes is what it takes to make a single bottle of wine, and one family’s secrets can’t be contained in a bottle in Laura Dave’s excellent new summer read.

 

Georgia Ford walks out of her wedding dress fitting and shows up at her childhood home on her family's vineyard, still wearing her dress, grappling with a major question about her future life with her fiancé, Ben. Looking for the comfort of her parents and her two brothers, not to mention her mother’s famous lasagna, she finds not everything at their once idyllic Last Straw Vineyard is the way it is supposed to be.

 

Her mother seems distracted and far away, her brothers are barely speaking and her father, well, he’s the workaholic he’s always been, but there’s a difference she can’t quite put her finger on. Then, there’s the grapes: Will this year’s harvest be their best but their last? As Georgia stays in her old bedroom and ignores Ben’s frantic phone calls, she finds herself taking on the responsibility of keeping everything and everyone together: The family she thought nothing could ever break apart, the relationship she thought was invincible and the family business, the one constant beauty they have all revolved around for their lives.

 

If you devoured two of the most popular books of last summer, Rainbow Rowell’s Landline and Emma Straub’s The Vacationers, you’ll love Eight Hundred Grapes. Enjoy with a glass of your favorite wine!

Jessica

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The Doll Maker

The Doll Maker

posted by:
July 3, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Doll MakerJessica Balzano and Kevin Byrne are back and hot on the trail of serial killers in Richard Montanari’s The Doll Maker, the eighth installment of this series about his Philadelphia-based investigators.

 

Byrne is grappling with the impending execution of a woman he put behind bars a decade before. The woman kidnapped and murdered a child, and he is convinced she had a hand in the disappearance of several other children. Determined to get her to confess to these disappearances before she dies, he has to navigate an endless spool of red tape to get close to her. However, there’s a new case developing that will take up all his time.

 

A girl sits placidly on a painted yellow bench as if waiting for a train, a half-smoked cigarette in her fingers. A passing cyclist initially doesn’t think anything is wrong, but then goes in for a closer look. The girl is dead, and the elaborately staged scene around her is part of a sick puzzle designed by killers who call themselves Mr. Marseille and Anabelle. When detectives Balzano and Byrne stumble upon an invitation to tea the next week at the murder site, they know they’re racing against time before the next death.

 

The next death happens, and this time it is two young people, but there’s something even more eerie waiting for the detectives: A doll designed to look exactly like the first victim and another invitation to tea for seven days from now. The victims seem random, but something about them triggers a memory for Byrne about a case he worked long ago.

 

Full of twists and turns and heart-stopping action, The Doll Maker is one to read for those who want to be spooked enough to sleep with the light on. Readers who enjoyed James Patterson’s The Postcard Killers, fans of a series like Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay and those who enjoy the show Criminal Minds will want to dive into the entire Balzano/Byrne series, starting with the first book, The Rosary Girls. 

Jessica

 
 

Awards Aplenty

Awards Aplenty

posted by:
July 1, 2015 - 7:00am

Thief of GloryCover of Ancillary SwordThe Christy Awards were awarded Monday, June 29 at a banquet in Orlando, Florida, with Sigmund Brouwer and Thief of Glory walking away with both "Book of the Year" and "Historical Romance of the Year". The Christy Awards honor and promote excellence in Christian fiction. Awards are given in several genres, including contemporary and suspense. Other winners included Mary Weber’s Storm Siren for "Young Adult" and Feast for Thieves by Marcus Brotherton which picked up the award for "First Novel". The Christy Awards are named in honor of iconic novelist Catherine Marshall’s Christy. A complete list of winners can be found on the Christy Award website.

 

Last weekend, the Locus Award winners were announced in Seattle, Washington, at a banquet emceed by Connie Willis. The Locus Awards are presented to winners of the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus' annual readers poll. Winner of the "Science Fiction Novel of the Year" went to Ancillary Sword by Ann Leckie while the "Fantasy Award" winner was The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison. Like the Christys, Locus Awards are also given to best debut and best young adult. Best First Novel was The Memory Garden by Mary Rickert and Young Adult was awarded to Half a King by Joe Abercrombie. For other winners, check out the complete list.

Maureen

 
 

Uprooted

Uprooted

posted by:
June 26, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for UprootedAward-winning and New York Times bestselling author, Naomi Novik has a newly released Sci-Fi novel titled Uprooted. Novik was raised hearing Polish fairy tales and her latest work draws on that background. This historical fantasy has magic, monarchy and myth tied into every drama-filled page.

 

The Wood is a darkly magical and terrifying forest where even the water and pollen is caustic. Dreadful creatures emerge from the Wood to attack people from nearby villages. In one of these villages, our tale begins with Agnieska, the unremarkable daughter of a wood cutter. Her small village is ruled and protected by a wizard referred to as Dragon.

 

Every 10 years, Dragon comes to claim a 17-year-old girl that he takes with him back to his inescapable tower. The whole village is certain that Dragon will select Kasia, Agnieska’s best friend, who is exemplary in every way. Everyone is shocked when Agnieska is the one swept away to Dragon’s tower, where Agnieska learns that she is far less ordinary than she once thought herself to be.

 

Novik artfully designs a fairy tale for adults in this coming-of-age fantasy. Fans of Bridget Zinn’s Poison are sure to enjoy the historical fantasy and strong female characters of Uprooted.

 

Randalee

 
 

The Turner House

The Turner House

posted by:
June 25, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Turner HouseDetroit: in its heyday, it was the bustling host to Motown and the "Big Three" auto manufacturers. The city also served as a mecca for African Americans escaping Jim Crow and taking advantage of the jobs available in its thriving economy. Set in Detroit, Angela Flournoy’s debut novel, The Turner House, tells the story of husband and wife Francis and Viola Turner and their 13 children while exploring their ties to their family home in Detroit.

 

Oldest sibling Cha-Cha is the Turner family patriarch by default. At 62 years old, he is both accustomed to and tired of assuming the role of leader to his younger siblings. With his father’s passing and his mother’s deteriorating health, the family’s house on Yarrow Street, once an emblem of success in Black America, is vacant and crumbling and saddled with a mortgage 10 times the home’s current value. While the Turner children jockey with their differing views of what to do with the debt-ridden property, Cha-Cha is engaging in a mid-life retrospective, evaluating his relationships with his parents, his wife and his siblings. The narrative revealing how Francis and Viola each made their way to Michigan from rural Arkansas is especially poignant. Flournoy’s writing is gentle, pointed and witty as she explores if blood ties, shared memories or something else entirely creates family bonds. Fans of Anne Tyler or J. California Cooper will lose themselves in the thoughtful story of The Turner House.

 

Lori

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A God in Ruins

A God in Ruins

posted by:
June 24, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for A God in RuinsKate Atkinson’s powerhouse novel Life After Life garnered impressive reviews in 2013, landing it on many "Best Of" lists for that year. Now she delves back into the lives of the Todd family in her soaring new novel, A God in Ruins.

 

Where Life After Life focused on the time-bending reimagining of the life of Ursula Todd, A God in Ruins’ lead character is her brother Teddy. We see Teddy come of age and go off to war, but this isn’t just a war novel. We are treated to every aspect of Teddy’s life: his marriage to girl-next-door Nancy, raising his daughter Viola and even his interactions with his grandchildren. His multiple triumphs and disappointments make it easy to root for his happiness.

 

The story isn’t chronological — rather it is told back-and-forth between different points of Teddy’s life, leaving the reader to make connections and judgements about events, waiting to see if those predictions are realized. Thanks to the richly developed characters and winning style, the novel is an engaging read. It is a wistful letter to the Todd family, and overall, to what it means to be a part of a family and part of our collective humanity.

 

Atkinson has said that she doesn’t view this novel as a sequel, rather as a companion piece to her previous bestseller. Those who enjoyed Life After Life will be glad to dive into A God in Ruins to catch up with the characters they loved. Both of these novels are also an excellent fit for those who have just finished All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr and are looking for a similar great read.

Jessica

 
 

Jurassic Park

Jurassic Park

posted by:
June 23, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Jurassic ParkThe theatrical release of Jurassic World brings a chance to go back 65 million years to a bygone age when dinosaurs walked the earth. Ever since Sir Richard Owen discovered the first dinosaur in 1828, humans have wondered what it would be like to live alongside these ancient creatures. As science became more widespread, the scenarios that made this possible became more and more far-fetched, from cavemen to entire worlds at the center of the planet. That all changed 25 years ago when Michael Crichton gave us Jurassic Park, backing dinosaur fantasies with hard science and showing us what living with dinosaurs would really be like — terrifying! The book went on to spawn one of the definitive movies of the ’90s, a thriller with unforgettable and horrifying monsters. Almost all of the science was dropped in favor of one of the great Jeff Goldblum roles. Three more sequels were released in the theaters, and one more in book form. So Jurassic Park was huge, but how was it as a book?

 

Every book shifts drastically from page to screen, and Jurassic Park more than most. The book was a morality play on the dangers of unexamined science and karmic retribution, with dinosaurs used as metaphor, the sugar to help the medicine go down.. Characters who expressed scientific views Crichton didn't like were eaten by dinosaurs in very messy ways. A quarter of a century on, many of those views have become outdated. At the time, the warm-blooded vs. cold-blooded debate was barely common knowledge, and the idea that many dinosaurs would have feathers was barely crossing paleontologist desks, much less the public consciousness.

 

Fortunately, the book has dinosaurs, and it has dinosaurs in far greater quantities than any of the movies. In a movie, a Tyrannosaurus Rex costs millions of dollars. In literature, a Tyrannosaurus Rex costs 16 letters. The result is dozens more dinosaur encounters in a wider range of species. Jurassic Park is the definitive adult dinosaur novel.

 

Matt

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