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The Lake House

posted by: November 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Lake HouseCancel all your plans, grab a blanket, a glass of wine and get comfy! Kate Morton’s latest novel The Lake House has been released. Featuring an abandoned house, an unsolved child’s disappearance and family intrigue galore, you will joyfully be reading late into the night, during meals and anytime you have a spare moment.


During the 1933 Midsummer Eve’s Party, 11-month-old Theo Edevane disappears without a trace from his ancestral home in Cornwall, England. Flash forward 70 years. Sadie Sparrow, disgraced police detective spending her mandatory leave in Cornwall, discovers the Edevane family estate. The house is located deep in the woods surrounded by ponds, trickling streams and idyllic gardens, like those described in fairy tales. But this is no fairy tale. Sparrow finds the house to have been abandoned. A saucer is on the table waiting for tea. Books are left open waiting for someone to read. It as if the family just left and locked the doors, never to return. What happened to Theo that fateful night in 1933? Why is the house abandoned? To get answers, Sparrow tracks down famed mystery author Alice Edevane, who was only 16 when her brother disappeared. What does Alice know about the events of that evening? Does she know more than she told police? Will she help Sadie solve her brother’s disappearance?


Told from each family member’s perspective, continuously shifting from the past to the present, Morton weaves an engaging tale of mystery, with layer upon layer of intrigue. A page-turner with an amazing ending, you will not be sorry you spent the time learning the mysteries of The Lake House. For more great reads by Morton, try The Secret Keeper and The House at Riverton. Just as good, I promise!


Mrs. Roosevelt’s Confidante

posted by: November 11, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Mrs. Roosevelt's ConfidanteIt’s December 1941, and a slumbering country awakes to the realities of war in Susan Elia MacNeal’s Mrs. Roosevelt’s Confidante. Maggie Hope returns to America as part of Winston Churchill’s entourage. In the wake of Pearl Harbor, the United States and Great Britain cement their ties and discuss strategy at the White House. During this delicate stage in their relationship, political enemies of the Roosevelts’ and their New Deal will do anything to harass the President — even if it undermines the war effort.


Mrs. Roosevelt, always passionate about domestic affairs, becomes involved in the scheduled execution of a 15-year-old sharecropper who shot a Virginia landowner. The President is now focused on winning the war and preventing the descent of a new Dark Age. In order to do this, he must have the support of the entire country, including the Jim Crow South. Virginia’s governor sees a way to disgrace the Roosevelt administration and simultaneously reduce the public pressure to reprieve the young inmate. His henchman sees a way to get into the governor’s good graces and ride his coattails into the White House. Maggie Hope must find a way to protect Eleanor Roosevelt from scandal, support the President’s strong leadership position and thus save Britain from Nazi rule.  


Once again, Susan Elia MacNeal provides a strong sense of place and captures the uncertainty of that turbulent time. It is a fascinating portal into the society of the 1940s; the marginalized role of women, the powerlessness of the minority, the awful power vested in the politicians we trust. Fans of Jacqueline Winspear, Charles Todd and James Benn will appreciate the strong characters and the exploration of subjects we often forget. While we tend to think of World War II as the time everyone came together for a common cause, the reality was far from this idealized picture. 


The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss

posted by: November 2, 2015 - 6:00am

Cover art for The Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss by Max WirestoneThe Unfortunate Decisions of Dahlia Moss have resulted in a familiar premise in this debut novel by Max Wirestone: Girl graduates from college with crippling debt and zero job prospects. Girl’s boyfriend has left her for another woman, forcing her to mooch room and board off the kindness of a friend.


But then Dahlia is randomly offered a lucrative job as a private detective. All she has to do is find and recover a virtual sword stolen in a video game. She is given the suspected culprit’s name, the time he will be meeting her for dinner and the assurance that he will turn over the sword. Dahlia Moss is no seasoned PI, but this sounds like easy money.


Of course the job ends up being more complicated than expected, especially after the man who hired her turns up dead—impaled by a real-life replica of the stolen sword. And he still owes her $1,000! Dahlia can’t help but wonder who killed him… and why did he even hire her in the first place? Soon Dahlia finds herself investigating multiple mysteries and enduring uncomfortable encounters with homicide detectives, the dead man’s former friends and guild mates, not to mention her own ex-boyfriend.


Fans of The Big Bang Theory and The Guild will enjoy the MMORPG setting and the nerdy humor. A former librarian, Wirestone got the idea for the Dahlia Moss series after noticing that many of his geeky customers were also his mystery lovers. He has created a lovable, unexpected heroine in Dahlia Moss. She is funny, she is sassy, she is an amateur Veronica Mars in a Jigglypuff hat.


Pretty Girls

posted by: October 21, 2015 - 7:00am

Pretty Girls by Karin Slaughter coverDo bad things happen to pretty girls? Yes, they do according to Karin Slaughter’s latest novel, Pretty Girls. A gripping, fast-paced, intense thriller that keeps you on the edge of your seat. From the first page she grabs you by the throat and does not let go until the very last word.


Pretty Girls begins with Claire Scott witnessing her husband Paul’s brutal murder. Paul was her provider, lover, soulmate and family for 20 years. She even disowned her sister, Lydia, when she accused him of attempted rape. She trusted Paul implicitly, while Lydia was a thieving alcoholic and drug addict. But how well did she really know him. Yes, he was by her side when her father committed suicide and endlessly filled the hole in her heart from her eldest sister’s disappearance. But now, 20 years later, another pretty girl has gone missing in their town and Paul has been murdered. Are these two events connected? Was Lydia telling the truth? As she moves forward from his death, Claire learns that Paul had secrets. But how deep are those secrets and how do they affect her and her sister Lydia? Who can she trust to help her find the truth? Masterfully told through both Claire and Lydia’s voices with excerpts from their father’s journal before his suicide, Slaughter weaves a tale of both deception and shock.


Filled with plenty of “aha!” moments only to be followed with “but what about…?” moments, Slaughter keeps you guessing to the very end. As you learn more about Paul Scott with each page, discovering the truth will become your mission as much as Claire’s. So much so that you may even suffer a sleepless night or two, but you will not regret it!


Looking for other twisting tales of deception like Pretty Girls? Try The Good Girl by Mary Kubica and Luckiest Girl Alive by Jessica Knoll.



Those Girls

posted by: October 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Those Girls by Chevy StevensSearching for a dark, suspenseful adult fiction novel that will steal your attention the moment you focus your eyes on page one? Sit down and relax. I have good news. I am happy to inform you that your search is over, my friend. Those Girls by Chevy Stevens is the book you’ve been looking for. Stevens' words gripped me with her opening sentence: "We'd only been on the road for an hour but we were almost out of gas." Sounds suspenseful, right? Well, keep reading.


Those Girls takes place in 1997 and follows the lives of three Campbell sisters: Dani, Courtney and Jess. They are young and unfortunate girls who live with their alcoholic father on a remote ranch in a small Western Canadian town called Littlefield. The Campbell sisters live a hard-knock life, and things only get worse once they commit a crime. The Campbell sisters create a plan to flee to Vancouver and start anew. Unfortunately, their plan hits a roadblock once the sisters run into danger that changes their lives forever. Fast forward to 2015, the Campbell sisters are adults living secretive lives in Vancouver. Although their tragic past is buried halfway in their minds, it comes back to haunt them and puts their loved ones in grave danger.


Those Girls is a fast-paced thriller, a guaranteed page-turner or your money back. I was just kidding about your money back. Seriously readers, add this book to your “must read” list. Caution, you may have trouble putting it down once you have it in your hands. Readers who enjoyed Gillian Flynn’s New York Times Bestselling novel Dark Places will love Steven’s Those Girls. Stevens’ is also a New York Times Bestselling author of Still Missing and That Night. She also penned Never Knowing and Always Watching. To find out more about Stevens, visit her website at



In the Dark Places

posted by: September 28, 2015 - 7:00am

In the Dark PlacesWhat appears to be the mundane investigation of a stolen farm tractor becomes a tangle of lies and a conspiracy of fools in Peter Robinson’s In the Dark Places. How is it possible for such a large piece of equipment to disappear so completely? An abandoned airplane hangar, the perfect location to transfer stolen goods, may be the answer, and there is ample evidence a murder has been committed at the site. This leads to the investigation of the sudden disappearance of two young men, one the son of a local farmer. 


The missing boy's girlfriend may be the key to finding the missing men. While Detective Annie Cabbot guards the potential witness, Detective Winsome Jackman is working closely with Terry Gilchrist, the witness who found the bloody crime scene, but the recently returned veteran of Afghanistan is far more interested in Winsome than he is in solving the crime. The body count rises when a fateful auto accident high in the Yorkshire hills reaps a grim harvest. 


Peter Robinson draws on the brooding atmosphere of the Yorkshire hills setting to examine the theme of isolation — in both the physical surroundings and in the lives of the characters. Taut, suspenseful, with a richly developed storyline and unforgettable characters, In the Dark Places is headed for award territory. Once you have read this novel, you’ll be sure to add Robinson to your must-read list. Readers of Ruth Rendell, Deborah Crombie and P.D. James will be delighted they discovered Robinson’s Inspector Banks. 


The Governor’s Wife

posted by: September 21, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art by The Governor's Wife by Michael HarveyPrivate investigator Michael Kelly is used to the mean streets of Chicago. Even so, in The Governor’s Wife by Michael Harvey, Kelly finds himself embroiled in some nefarious dealings that even he finds troubling. The case starts out fairly straightforward for Kelly. Someone wants him to find former Illinois governor Ray Perry, who mysteriously disappeared after being sentenced to 38 years in prison for corruption. It doesn’t even bother Kelly that his client remains anonymous or that they've deposited a $200,000 retainer fee in his bank account. However, when the bodies start piling up and Kelly’s own life is threatened, he begins to wonder if he is being set up. Can he trust anyone to tell him the truth?


Michael Harvey obviously has a penchant for the hardboiled detective stories in the style of Mickey Spillane and Nero Wolfe. His fast-paced plot is filled with clichés of the tough–as-nails private eye who is one step ahead of the bad guys. There's plenty of action, rough language, plot twists, gun play and femme fatales, but Harvey has updated these elements for the 21st century. If you enjoy a throwback to a time when a P.I. lived by a code of honor and the bad guys were thoroughly evil, then The Governor’s Wife will appeal to you.



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