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Missing, Presumed

posted by: July 27, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Missing, PresumedWhen Detective Sergeant Manon Bradshaw arrives on the scene of the crime, the door is hanging open, there is an abandoned coat in the foyer and broken glass and blood splatter in the kitchen. These are the only clues to track in Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner. The victim is Ph.D. candidate Edith Hind, daughter of eminent surgeon Sir Ian Hind. Sir Ian is highly connected, but despite pressure from the Home Secretary, there are very few clues to follow, and time is running out for Edith and the Cambridgeshire Police.

 

Manon’s frustration grows as the first 72 hours — considered the most vital in a missing person’s case — seep away. As the press circles the scene like vultures, devouring the most salacious details of Edith’s love life, Manon’s team scrambles to gather more clues. With the clock ticking and pressure on every side, Manon must delve the deepest secrets of a very private prominent family to unearth what really happened to Edith.

 

Steiner uses multiple perspectives from different characters to create a wholly believable story with psychological depth. She develops the characters through their distinct eccentricities; Manon listens to a police scanner to ease herself to sleep, her colleague Davy peppers police jargon throughout his conversations and the missing Edith can recycle anything into an art project. One revelation after another brings you to a conclusion you do not see coming. This police procedural has all the elements of a riveting psychological thriller. Missing, Presumed is a beautifully written novel by an up-and-coming writer.

 


 
 

Harrow County

posted by: July 20, 2016 - 7:00am

Harrow CountyStrange things are happening in Harrow County. Unrecognizable shadows roost in the barns. A boy’s skin is found hanging in the woods, shed like a snake. And young Emmy is starting to remind  the townsfolk of someone they tried hard to forget.

 

Harrow County, the new series by writer Cullen Bunn and artist Tyler Cook, is a coming-of-age tale told with the moody evocations of a campfire horror story. At times both wondrous and horrifying, it centers on a teenage girl’s journey to discover the darkness and magic of the supernatural.

 

Although she doesn’t know it, Emmy is the reincarnation of Hester Beck, a powerful witch the townsfolk burned at the stake before Emmy was born. In her time, Hester created countless haints (a southern colloquialism for restless spirits) that terrorized the town but now look to Emmy for guidance. On top of that, her neighbors suspect that Emmy’s new powers mean she’ll be just as bad as Hester. To survive them both, Emmy must learn to find humanity in the creatures of the woods.

 

Tyler Crook’s vivid watercolors bring a kaleidoscopic warmth to the southern ghost story. Even his most unsettling creatures move with such character that they become sympathetic, such as the lonely minotaur the Abandoned or the Skinless Boy who is introduced as the most disturbing creature in the book but slowly becomes as friendly and approachable as a pet dog.

 

With this comic next in line for a small screen adaptation, fans of other dark comic adapted TV such as the recent hits Outcast and Preacher will want to take note. The creators have even made their own soundtrack — such is their dedication to giving readers the willies.


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The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend

posted by: June 30, 2016 - 7:00am

The Readers of Broken Wheel RecommendLooking forward to meeting her fellow book lover and American pen-pal Amy for the first time, Swede Sara Lindqvist arrives in Amy’s hometown of Broken Wheel, Iowa — just in time to meet the mourners leaving Amy’s funeral. Sara had planned for a two-month vacation of reading and talking about her favorite books with Amy; now she has no friend, no real plans and no one to talk books with.

 

Broken Wheel isn’t what she expected from Amy’s letters, and the people who still live in the dying Midwestern town definitely don’t know what to expect from its first tourist. They don’t expect her to stay for the two months, and they certainly don’t expect her to open a book shop stocked with Amy’s vast collection. But in The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend by Katarina Bivald, that is exactly what Sara does when she decides that what the townspeople need most is books.

 

The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend is a love song to books and booklovers everywhere, with no judgments passed on what is read. Sara’s plan focuses more on engendering a similar level of affection that she feels towards books in the townspeople. In addition to celebrating books, readers will fall for the quirky characters themselves, from Sara to the members of the town. The book is lighthearted and genuine without ever becoming saccharine, and Bivald slips some funny moments as the townspeople come to accept Sara and she starts to take charge of her life.

 

Part chick lit, part book review and all heart, The Readers of Broken Wheel Recommend lets us remember not only how books change and stay with us but also how they can connect us to each other, even across oceans or differences in experience. Fans of Nina George’s The Little Paris Bookshop may enjoy the time they spend in Broken Wheel.


 
 

The Devil You Know

posted by: June 29, 2016 - 7:00am

The Devil You KnowCan a person con their way out of a "lawyer-tight" contract that promises his or her soul to the Devil upon death? K. J. Parker, a two-time winner of the World Fantasy Award, will elegantly feed you this delicious information in his science fiction and fantasy novella The Devil You Know.

 

“...Why exactly do you want to sell your soul to us?” This is a question that a demon case officer, who is in the soul buying business, asks his new client, Saloninus, the world’s greatest philosopher, liar, cheat and trickster. Time flew by rather quickly for Saloninus, a 77-year-old man who believes he wasted his talent on scheming others. Unhappy with the fact that he has no self-respecting achievements, he decides to sign a contract to sell his soul to the Devil in order to acquire 20 more years of life on Earth and a youthful transformation to age 25 for the opportunity to make a mark on history. Once Saloninus signs the contract, the demon case officer becomes his servant, who uses his own supernatural abilities to grant Saloninus outlandish requests. When the demon questions Saloninus about what he plans to do with his additional years on Earth, the philosopher behaves suspiciously. This behavior gives the demon a reason to believe that the old trickster is up to his old tricks again and that his target is… the Devil. Saloninus is supposed to be the cleverest man on Earth. Will Saloninus successfully swindle the Devil? The demon case officer is supposed to be the best in the business. Will he halt Saloninus’ plan? To swindle or not to swindle, that is the question.

 

Readers who relish stories that involve the supernatural, mortality and good and evil, will find K. J. Parker’s novella The Devil You Know delightful and possibly frightful. Add this entertaining treat to your summer reading list — if you dare.


 
 

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