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Zeke White

Zeke White must have been born to work in a library, because he has never felt quite at home without a stack of reading material at his disposal. Raised in a rural, small town in south Georgia, books were a window into other worlds, both real and imaginary. Zeke reads in nearly every fiction genre, and is also a big fan of science and technology nonfiction. He loves biographies, graphic novels, and anything related to Russia. When he doesn't have his nose in a book, Zeke also enjoys hiking and traveling. You can find him at the Catonsville branch where he works as a librarian.

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Something Wicked

Something Wicked

posted by:
August 28, 2013 - 6:00am

Night Film book coverNight Film by Marisha Pessl will be one of the most talked about books of the fall. This new thriller is riveting, impossible to put down and hair-raisingly creepy.
 

It's the story of a washed-up journalist ruined by the story that got away. Scott McGrath was once a successful investigative journalist who tracked down the darkest, seediest stories. The one elusive target that cost him his career was film director Michael Cordova. Cordova is the director of dark, transgressive films that are so disturbing they cannot be played in theaters. The films are only rarely shown at secret screenings in tunnels around the world.
 

During his initial investigation of Cordova, McGrath got a lead that the secretive film director may be hurting children. McGrath went public with the accusation and was subsequently sued by Cordova’s team of lawyers. Since he had no definitive proof, his career as a journalist was essentially over.
 

Fast-forward several years later. Cordova’s daughter, Ashley, has just committed suicide under mysterious circumstances, and McGrath again becomes obsessed with the dark, twisted world of the Cordovas. Follow McGrath into the world of Michael Cordova where reality is elusive and dark forces may be at work.
 

Pessl’s unique style will be one of the first things readers notice. She spins her dark labyrinthine tale by interspersing newspaper and website clippings throughout the book. The technique pulls the reader further into the book and adds to the overall authenticity of her story.
 

Readers who like creepy, disturbing stories will relish the dark paths McGrath will take to find the truth.

Zeke

 
 

A Cold War Friendship

A Cold War Friendship

posted by:
August 1, 2013 - 6:00am

You Are One of Them Cover ArtYou Are One of Them is Elliot Holt’s new coming-of-age novel, a story of two neighbors who become best friends at the height of the Cold War during the 1980s. Sarah Zukerman and Jenny Jones are best friends growing up in a Washington, D.C. suburb and doing everything together. Out of boredom on a rainy afternoon, they decide to write a letter to Yuri Andropov, the secretary general of the Soviet Union’s Communist party. They are children of the Cold War and afraid of nuclear war. They hope that Andropov will understand that regular Americans just want to live in peace.
 

Andropov actually decides to answer Jenny’s letter and a media sensation is born. Jenny and her parents are invited to the Soviet Union. She becomes a poster child for peace at a time when the US and USSR seem only to be obsessed with nuclear brinkmanship. Due to a possible betrayal by Jenny, the girls' friendship never quite recovers once Jenny's family returns to the US. Jenny and her family remain media sensations, taking publicity trips all over the country. One of the trip ends in plane crash, killing the entire Jones family.
 

Fast-forward 10 years: Sarah receives a mysterious email from a young Russian woman who suggests that maybe Jenny’s family did not really die in the crash. Maybe Jenny is still alive and living in Russia. The Russian reminds Sarah that Americans cannot believe everything they’re told by the media. Sarah decides to find out once and for all. She goes to Russia to find her friend — and maybe herself.
 

Holt has successfully blended the '80s setting and D.C. locale to create an acutely realistic coming-of-age story. The period details are spot-on without obscuring the overall story. This book is also a riveting spy tale, but one with reflection and depth.
 

Also, highly recommended on audiobook.

Zeke

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Victorian Violence

Victorian Violence

posted by:
July 26, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Murder as a Fine ArtLove learning new things while also reading a page-turning historical thriller? Check out David Morrell’s Murder as a Fine Art.  Set in Victorian England, Morrell’s “hero” is the essayist Thomas De Quincey, author of Confessions of an Opium Eater.

 

A heinous crime is committed in 1854, England. The gruesome methods of the crime are lifted directly from a De Quincey essay, “On Murder Considered as One of the Fine Arts.” As it happens, De Quincey and his daughter Emily were in England at the time of the murder. He suddenly becomes a prime suspect. With the help of a couple of Scotland Yard detectives, it will be up to De Quincey and Emily to prove his innocence and find the killer.

 

De Quincey is a fascinating historical figure. He wrote about the inner psyche decades before Sigmund Freud and was surrounded by artistic friends such as William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

 

Murder as a Fine Art is one part novel and one part history lesson. Scotland Yard was still relatively new, and investigative techniques were still rather primitive. Morrell gives his readers a real sense of Victorian England, with its straight-laced exterior hiding a dark underbelly of vice.

 

For additional historical thrillers set in the Victorian era, check out The Alienist by Caleb Carr and Alex Grecian’s The Yard. For an excellent nonfiction treatment of crime in the Victorian era, see Kate Summerscale’s The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective.
 

Zeke

 
 

Village People

Village People

posted by:
June 20, 2013 - 6:01am

The VillageThe Village: 400 years of Beats and Bohemians, Radicals and Rogues: A History of Greenwich Village by John Strausbaugh is a loving tribute to one of the most vibrant neighborhoods in the world, Greenwich Village in New York City. In the modern era, Greenwich Village has been synonymous with radical art, poetry music and political change.

 

Since the very beginning of its settlement in the 17th century, the land that would later be known as Greenwich Village or just “The Village,” has always been an outpost for rebels and misfits. It was originally home to just a few hundred people, whose regular sources of entertainment included taverns and brothels. During the next 400 years, The Village continued to be home to radicals and rogues of every stripe.

 

Just browsing through Strausbaugh's history is a reminder of the Village’s amazing artistic output, in the late 20th century alone. Alan Ginsburg and Bob Dylan got their start in The Village, as did Andy Warhol, Jack Kerouac and Lenny Bruce. It was also an epicenter in the gay rights movement. The Stonewall Inn Bar had been raided many times before but the infamous police raid on a hot night in June of 1969. That particular raid has been memorialized as simply “Stonewall,” the event galvanized the LGBT community into civil rights activism. For anyone interested in New York City or American cultural history, The Village is a treasure trove of fascinating stories and personalities.

 

 

Zeke

 
 

Twin Memories

Twin Memories

posted by:
May 23, 2013 - 7:01am

HerHer by Christa Parravani is a powerful memoir that explores sisterhood, the bonds of twins and the nature of grief. Christa Parravani is an identical twin to her sister, Cara. Cara dies a tragic death and Christa nearly destroys herself, in an attempt to follow in her footsteps. Her is the biography of the twins but it also serves as a lovely and unflinchingly honest memorial to Cara.

 

Cara and Christa did not have an easy childhood. As teens and young adults, their behavior veered toward the destructive, including eating disorders and drug abuse. Both sisters were incredibly creative, with Cara as the writer and Christa, the photographer. Cara and Christa remained close throughout their adulthood and continued to experiment with unhealthy habits. After Cara is raped, she begins a downward spiral and never really recovers.

 

Her is a fascinating memoir about the highly unique dynamic between identical twins. Parravani addresses all the usual perceptions people have about twins such as “twin language” and “twin ESP.” Given the intense connection between twins, the death of one can nearly destroy the other. This is essentially what happened to Christa after Cara’s untimely death. She tried to follow her into death, taking up her most damaging habits, just to be closer to Cara. Parravani has written a touching, raw new memoir. Her love and grief for her sister is almost palpable. Although Her is a very emotional book, Parravani writes in clear, crisp prose, telling the story in an almost matter-of-fact tone that results in powerful, clear-eyed memorial to her twin, sister and best friend.

Zeke

 
 

Reconciliation

Letting It GoLetting it Go is Miriam Katin’s gorgeous new graphic novel, in which she tries to come to terms with her past as a Holocaust survivor. Due to her past, Katin had come to despise all things German. When her son moves to Berlin, she realizes she must somehow come to terms with Germany if she is to maintain a relationship with her son.

 

Born in Hungary during the Second World War, Katin eventually immigrated to Israel in 1957 where she worked as a graphic artist for the Israeli Defense Forces. She went on to work for the MTV Animation and Disney Studios. She wrote her first graphic novel, We Are On Our Own, at the age of 63.  Although Katin is writing about very heavy subject matter, the overall tone and art remain fairly light and at times, humorous. At once literary and accessible, Letting it Go reveals Katin’s daily life with her husband in New York while calling on the likes of Kafka to reveal her inner fears.

 

Done in colored pencil, Letting it Go works exceedingly well as a graphic novel. Katin is able to reveal details and nuance in her art, letting us inside her psyche. The mostly panel-less comics flow nicely with the fairly free-form text. The mix of black and white and color also nicely juxtaposes past and present. Like Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi, this would make an excellent introduction to nonfiction graphic novels.

 

 

Zeke

 
 

Mash-Up, Anyone?

Mash-Up, Anyone?

posted by:
April 22, 2013 - 7:15am

Red CountryFantasy fans have much to celebrate when Joe Abercrombie releases a new book and they will not be disappointed with his latest novel, Red Country.  Leave it up to Abercrombie to pull off a successful mash-up of a fantasy and a western. Red Country is fun, bloody and action-packed. His latest will be celebrated by the most ardent Abercrombie fans and is sure to create a new fanbase to add to his legion. While Red Country is a stand- alone novel, fans will recognize several characters from this First Law series. At the center of Red Country is Shy South, a tough-as-nails heroine who is seeking vengeance. Her home has been burned, her brother and sister stolen. She sets off to rescue her siblings and is accompanied by Lamb, her timid stepfather who seems to have a mysterious past.

 

Red Country has everything Abercrombie fans have come to expect: deeply-flawed characters, bloody action, realistic dialogue and lots of black humor. Added to this, the novel also succeeds as a Western, complete with frontier towns, a gold rush, a few duels and more than a few ghosts. Abercrombie is often compared to George R.R. Martin of Game of Thrones fame. He now stands on his own as one of the freshest, most unique voices in fantasy. Together with his First Law trilogy, Red Country is a perfect introduction to readers who have not yet tried Abercrombie’s version of fantasy. Highly recommended for fans of George R.R. Martin and Patrick Rothfuss.

 

Zeke

 
 

Hilarious and Hip: An Immigrant Story

Fresh Off the BoatEddie Huang is co-owner of the hugely successful Baohaus, a Taiwanese bun shop in New York’s East Village. Fresh off the Boat, his provocative new memoir, is a refreshingly current take on the immigrant story and a very funny book. Huang recounts his upbringing in Orlando, Florida. He attended a mostly white school, struggling to stay true to his Taiwanese culture, while also wanting to fit in. For his school lunch, his mother usually prepared a home-cooked Taiwanese meal. He didn’t want food that smelled or looked any different from that of his peers. He talked his mom into allowing him to take the processed pre-packed meals and juice boxes.

 

He describes going into wealthy white homes where the kids had so many toys, he didn’t know what to play with first. He does not shy away from his tough upbringing but maintains a light, irreverent tone, no matter the subject.  In time, he came to embrace his own culture. He is proud of his Asian-American background but refuses to be anything but himself. He criticizes Hollywood’s emasculated version of Asian-American men, loves partying, hip-hop, basketball and football.

 

Throughout Huang’s life, his love of food remains constant and his passion for food culture is infectious. Equally infectious is Huang’s humor, perhaps best captured in the audiobook version. Huang is the narrator and his hip, street-smart humor comes off best in his distinct Brooklyn accent. Besides audiobook listeners, Fresh Off the Boat will also find fans among memoir readers, pop-culture enthusiasts and foodies.

Zeke

 
 

Feed Them on Your Dreams

Far From the TreeFar from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity is Andrew Solomon’s exploration of the infinitely complex relationship between parents and children. He investigates the nature of parenting children who are exceptional in a variety of ways. Solomon interviews families with children who are prodigies, deaf, dwarfs, autistic, schizophrenic or are transgender, for example.  He bookends these stories with his own experience at being both a son and father. There are common themes among parents whose children possess these unique qualities. The individual stories inspire every emotion—heartbreak, grief, anger and joy. Although very challenging, parents maintain their child’s “difference” is a gift. The families often gain incredible strength and resilience.

 

Solomon’s psychiatric and academic backgrounds add depth and context to the exploration of each “condition”. He examines big issues such as identity, culture and “nature vs. nurture.” He provides overall context, history, and the latest research.  Thanks to his engaging storytelling skills, the information is readily accessible and truly fascinating.

 

Solomon is the perfect author for such a book. His previous work, The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, was the winner of fourteen different book awards and was a Pulitzer Prize finalist. He is a Lecturer in Psychiatry at Cornell University and Special Advisor on LGBT Affairs at Yale’s University Department of Psychiatry. He writes with clarity and warmth about extremely complex issues. This book is highly recommended to regular readers of nonfiction, parents, teachers, and anyone hoping to gain a deeper understanding of what it means to parent a child.

Zeke

 
 

Stonewall Winners Announced

The Last NudeAristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the UniverseFor Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Still Not EnoughThe 2013 Stonewall Book Awards were announced at this year’s American Library Association Midwinter meeting. The Stonewall Book Awards are given each year to exceptional books reflecting the gay, lesbian and transgender experience. Each year a fiction, nonfiction, and children's or young adult title is chosen for the award. Honor books are also chosen in each category. This year’s Barbara Gittings Literature Award went to The Last Nude by Ellis Avery. It tells the story of the passionate, tortured relationship between Tamara de Lempicka and her muse, Rafaela. The Last Nude is highly recommended to anyone who wants to immerse themselves in the Lost Generation of Paris, learn more about twentieth century art or simply wants to read a fascinating, wholly engrossing love story.

 

The Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children's & Young Adult Literature Award went to Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz. Aristotle and Dante, two Mexican-American teens, are trying to figure out where they fit in the universe and how to navigate their ever-evolving friendship. Aristotle and Dante walked away with multiple awards this year. In addition to the Stonewall Award, it was also the winner of the Pura Belpre’ Award, which goes to the work for children and youth that best represents the Latino cultural experience. The book also garnered a Printz honor award, which highlights teen books of excellent literary merit.

 

This year’s Israel Fishman Nonfiction Award was given to For Colored Boys Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow is Still Not Enough: Coming of Age, Coming Out and Coming Home, edited by Keith Boykin. For Colored Boys is a collection of over 40 essays and personal stories from gay and transgender people of color. The collection features essays on coming out in communities of color, religion, HIV/AIDS, family dynamics and finding love. A powerful and diverse collection, For Colored Boys gives voice to life stories that are rarely told.

 

A complete list of The Stonewall Winners and Honor Books can be found on the ALA website.

 

Zeke