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Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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Bloggers

 

Color Your World

Color Your World

posted by:
September 25, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for My Blue Is HappyCover art for Henri's ScissorsColors arouse emotions, but the feelings evoked are as unique as each person. Jessica Young tackles this concept in My Blue Is Happy. Readers follow one girl as she explores with family and friends and shares her original ideas about colors. Her best friend likes pink because it’s pretty, but our protagonist finds it annoying, like a piece of gum stuck to your shoe or a bug bite. Chocolate is ordinary says her dad, but this little girl thinks it’s special like chocolate syrup. The girl travels through her world in nine colors, concisely expressing her ideas about each. Illustrator Catia Chen’s vibrant acrylic illustrations capture all the personalities of the colors. Sure gray can be cold like a rainstorm, but if you’re cuddling with grandma on a cozy chair it’s warm and fuzzy. Young deftly explores the idea of contrasts and encourages readers to carefully consider the different feelings colors suggest.

 

In Henri’s Scissors, written and illustrated by Jeanette Winter, color is the star, helping an aging artist reinvent his creative self. Winter covers Mattise’s early years and journey toward becoming an artist, but her focus here is on the last years of his life, following an illness that left him unable to paint. When faced without a creative outlet, Matisse was overjoyed when he picked up a pair of scissors and started cutting colored paper. He transformed his sick room into a secret fantasy garden filled with vibrant flowers and showy birds. The illustrations, acrylic and cut-paper, are simple, yet perfectly depict the joy Matisse felt while amidst some of his finest works. This is a tender homage to a man whose legacy is such everlasting beauty.
 

Maureen

 
 

The Graduates

The Graduates

posted by:
September 24, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Brooklyn GirlsDiplomas – check. Now what? The familiar dilemmas facing recent college graduates are played out in Gemma Burgess’ fresh new series, Brooklyn Girls, also the title of the first book. While the focus is on Pia, Burgess carefully introduces readers to her roommates Angie, Julia, Coco and Madeleine, who all share a brownstone in Brooklyn.

 

Pia is stylish and fun, but likes to party and is unsure of her future. When she finds herself unemployed following a night of heavy drinking and an ill-advised Facebook photo, Pia is at a crossroads. Her parents cut off her allowance and insist that she return home. But after years of boarding school and college, Brooklyn finally feels like home. If she wants to stay, she needs a job fast. Waitressing is an epic failure, and her art history degree is useless. She jumps at the chance to purchase a food truck knowing there is a market for cheap and healthy breakfast and lunch alternatives. Thus, Skinny Wheels is born. The business booms and Pia also finds love, or at least like. She has always avoided relationships following a bad break-up, but when Aidan enters her life she is instantly smitten. Her life is full of ups and downs, and Pia is soon faced with roommate issues and the nice man who loanded her start-up money. Turns out he is a not-so-nice loan shark complete with menacing thugs.

 

Gemma Burgess has successfully recreated the emotional roller coaster that is the hallmark of post-college life with humor and honesty. Burgess wrote this series to capture the bonds of friendship during the tumultuous 20s, when you’re broke but having too much fun to care. Viewers who enjoy Lena Dunham’s HBO series, Girls, should appreciate this less gritty, but still realistic look at five young women getting ready to start real life. Look for the next installment featuring Angie in the spring.

Maureen

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Help Save the World

Help Save the World

posted by:
September 20, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for Wild BornBrandon Mull kicks off the latest multi-platform series for tweens with Wild Born, the first book in the Spirit Animals series. Each title will be written by a different popular children’s author. This new fantasy adventure series joins kid favorites, The 39 Clues and Infinity Ring, and is sure to be a hit with readers who appreciate fast-paced stories combined with online interaction.
 

The series is set in Erdas, a fantasy world where 11-year-old children are tested to see if they possess a spirit animal. If positive, the children will share a rare connection with an animal, a bond so strong that great powers are bestowed on both. Four children from vastly different cultures and all parts of the world not only reveal a spirit animal, but each calls one of The Four Fallen Beasts. Conor, Abeke, Meilin and Rollan call forth a wolf, leopard, panda and falcon. The resurrection of these four mighty animals signals a resurgence of an evil power that needs to be stopped. These four children are destined for the ultimate mission — to save Erdas. With the assistance of a powerful-but-secretive order, the four learn to bond with their animal and gain strength, wisdom and courage. The action is non-stop entertainment, and the world of Erdas is so clearly drawn, readers will be easily transported to this fantasy land.
 

The online role-playing game, available here, allows children to customize their own unique heroes, choose their spirit animals and go on their own quests to help save Erdas. Each book will unlock additional levels of game play. Look for the second book in the series in January, written by New York Times bestselling author Maggie Stiefvater. Additional authors slated to add installments include Marie Lu and Garth Nix.

Maureen

 
 

National Book Award Longlists Announced

National Book Award Longlists Announced

posted by:
September 19, 2013 - 11:00am

National Book Foundation LogoEarlier this morning, the National Book Foundation announced the Longlist of titles for the National Book Award for Fiction. This is the fourth Longlist announced this week, the others being Young People’s Literature, Poetry and Nonfiction. This is also the first time in the history of the award that the Foundation has offered Longlists in each category. All titles are available here. Start reading now and see if your winners match the Foundation's. The finalists will be announced on October 16th and the winners will be announced on November 20th.

Maureen

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Access Old Hollywood

Rita Moreno: a MemoirAva Gardner: the Secret ConversationsThe Ear of the Heart: An Actresses’ Journey from Hollywood to Holy VowsThree starlets share very different stories of life during Hollywood’s Golden Age. In Rita Moreno: a Memoir, the actress recalls her childhood move from lush Puerto Rico to gritty New York City where she found her passion for singing and dancing. She made her Broadway debut at 13 and eventually headed to Hollywood where she changed her name and coped with constant typecasting.  Moreno shares the details behind her relationships with some of Tinseltown’s heaviest hitters, including Elvis Presley, Howard Hughes, and Marlon Brando. Eventually, Moreno found happiness in marriage and motherhood and she remains one of the few performers, and the only Hispanic, to win two Emmys, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony.

 

Two years before her death in 1990, Ava Gardner was strapped for cash and didn’t want to part with her jewels so she decided to sell her unvarnished story. She had a change of heart when she felt the conversations exposed her as too vulgar.  Her ghost writer Peter Evans unearthed those bawdy recollections and with permission of her estate shares them in Ava Gardner: the Secret Conversations. Readers will savor the particulars of her marriages to Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw, and Frank Sinatra, as well as her flings with George C. Scott and Howard Hughes (again!). Gardner, one of the great beauties to grace the silver screen, is no-nonsense and her stories are indeed salty, but she is also funny, frank and reflective.

 

Dolores Hart catapulted to fame when she starred opposite Elvis Presley in her 1957 film debut, Loving You. Nine films, a Broadway appearance, and several television roles later, Hart stunned the world when she turned away from Hollywood and her fiancé, and took the vows of a contemplative Benedictine nun.  In The Ear of the Heart: An Actresses’ Journey from Hollywood to Holy Vows, Hart and co-author Richard DeNeut, share her insider’s perspectives of such wildly different worlds and her serenity shines through the pages. Check out God is the Bigger Elvis, the Oscar winning short film for more on the remarkable Mother Hart.  

Maureen

 
 

Starting Over

Starting Over

posted by:
September 9, 2013 - 7:00am

The Widow WaltzThe Lost HusbandTwo novels explore the impact sudden death has on loved ones left behind, particularly the wives. Despite the weighty premise, both authors offer portraits of realistic women dealing with grief, coping with untenable situations and finding the courage to begin again.

 

Georgia Silver-Waltz’s life is turned upside down following her husband’s sudden death. The Widow Waltz by Sally Koslow explores the grief, betrayal, hope and renewal experienced by the newly widowed Georgia and her daughters, Cola and Luey. Georgia and Ben’s marriage was perfect. They lived in a lux apartment in Manhattan and enjoyed a vacation home in the Hamptons. Georgia was happy. And then Ben was gone. And with him went the money. Georgia takes charge of her life, finds a job, starts selling everything, and slowly steps into the dating pool. Cola and Luey are both forced to grow up as each deal with life-changing decisions. Koslow beautifully writes of a changing family dynamic and three women made stronger and brought closer despite their loss.

 

 “It occurs to me that you and your two children have been living with your mother for two whole years, and I’m writing to see if you’d like to be rescued.” Upon receipt of that letter, Libby Moran leaps at the opportunity to turn her life around in The Lost Husband by Katherine Center. The past two years were spent working a dead-end job and living with her narcissistic mother. The move to Aunt Jean’s goat farm means a job, a change of scenery and perhaps a taste of bliss for Libby and her children.  Life on Aunt Jean’s goat farm means hard work, but it’s also peaceful and the handsome farm manager is a nice diversion. As Libby slowly sheds her mantle of grief, she realizes that she has created a happy home for her family. This is a heartwarming story of love, family and forgiveness in a country setting complete with quirky small-town characters.

Maureen

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As Time Goes By in Charm City

Lost Baltimore cover artLost Baltimore by Gregory Alexander and Paul Williams pays homage to vanishing icons from the landscape of Baltimore’s past. Emphasis is on bygone buildings, but the authors also remember professional sports teams and businesses which left the city and impacted the livelihood of many denizens of Charm City. While tourists and residents see the Inner Harbor as the jewel in Baltimore’s crown and enjoy updated sports’ venues, this book sheds light on the dramatic changes to its skyline in just the past 150 years.  
 

The authors start in 1860 with the demolition of the First Presbyterian Church and continue through today with the virtual disappearance of arabbers in the city. Detailed text and rich images bring Baltimore’s past to life in this engaging coffee table page-turner. Mention is made of the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 which destroyed so many buildings, lives and, indeed, the layout of the city. But the authors are careful to look at all aspects of life in Baltimore which have changed over the years. Enjoy reminiscing about cherished sports teams — the Baltimore Bullets left in 1973, followed by the Baltimore Colts a decade later. And whatever happened to the mysterious Poe Toaster whose annual visits ceased in 2009? It is the disappearing industries which have had the most impact on Charm City and its changing population. Major businesses which have left or are now defunct include the Baltimore Shipyards (1984), McCormick Spice plant (1989), Hutzler’s (1990) and Bethlehem Steel plant at Sparrows Point (2012).
 

This fascinating look at our city sheds light on societal changes and the evolution of Baltimore from a manufacturing and shipping capital to tourist and business center. Paging through this entertaining and informative book allows readers to step back and enjoy the Baltimore of old.

Maureen

 
 

Runaway Bride

Runaway Bride

posted by:
August 29, 2013 - 7:00am

Chose the Wrong Guy cover artTen years ago, Quinn Barton left her fiancé Burke Morrison standing at the altar after the best man revealed the groom’s cheating ways. Quinn’s story, told in flashbacks and in the present, is at the center of Beth Harbison’s humorous and heartwarming Chose the Wrong Guy, Gave Him the Wrong Finger. But Quinn’s story wouldn’t be complete without the resolution of her relationships with Burke and his family, for the best man was Burke’s brother Frank, and their grandmother Dottie has remained a presence in Quinn’s life.
 

Quinn and Burke began dating in high school and were set to marry following Quinn’s college graduation. Quinn thought all her dreams were coming true until Frank’s devastating disclosure. She returns the wedding presents and hits the road with Frank. The two end up in Vegas and enjoy a sizzling two-day interlude. But Quinn is still shell-shocked and not ready for a new relationship, especially with Burke’s brother. Quinn returns home, shutters her heart and retreats to a life focused on work at her bridal shop. When Dottie comes to her looking for a wedding dress, Quinn realizes that Burke and Frank will be returning to town. Old wounds are re-opened, and Quinn finds herself questioning her decision to dump Burke. Her best friend Glenn senses her turmoil and is determined to get her out of her ten-year rut. He proposes a 30-Day Challenge, wherein he will give her a daily task that she MUST complete. These include Drink All Day Day, Wear a Side Pony Day, and Go Commando Day. Hilarity ensues as does a shift in Quinn’s attitude about life and love.
 

Quinn finds herself once again torn between two brothers and readers will also choose sides in this romantic tug-of-war. Harbison peppers the story with pop culture references, and the succession of brides-to-be in her shop provide plenty of laughs. Quinn is a wounded but lovable character who must relive the past in order to finally create her future.

Maureen

 
 

The Passing of a Legend

The Passing of a Legend

posted by:
August 20, 2013 - 10:51am

Cover art for RaylanBestselling crime writer Elmore Leonard passed away today at age 87 following a stroke earlier this month. Leonard’s remarkable publishing career spanned six decades. His initial works were westerns, and the first of these was published in 1953. His most recent book, Raylan, featuring one of his most popular characters, was released in 2012.

 

Leonard’s colorful characters, strong dialogue and gritty, realistic settings quickly caught the eye of Hollywood. Twenty-six of Leonard's novels and short stories have been adapted for movies and television. Among his best-known works which made it to the big screen are Get Shorty, Out of Sight, Hombre and Rum Punch, which was filmed as Jackie Brown. Several of Leonard's short stories were also made into popular movies, including 3:10 to Yuma and The Tall T. The current FX series Justified is based on short stories and novels featuring Leonard’s enduring character Raylan Givens, a deputy U.S. Marshal.

 

While maintaining a popular readership, Leonard also received critical acclaim. In November, Leonard received a Medal for Distinguished Contribution from the National Book Foundation. Other honors include a Peabody Award for the television show Justified, a Grand Master Edgar Award and a PEN Lifetime Achievement Award.

 

Check out some of the titles available in a variety of formats by this legendary author.

Maureen

 
 

Do. See. Feel.

Do. See. Feel.

posted by:
August 19, 2013 - 7:00am

SugarSugar is a spunky 10-year-old living on the Wills’ River Road Plantation in Reconstruction Mississippi. She is named after the cane she toils in and despises. Her father was sold when she was a baby, and her mother died two years earlier after years of brutal labor finally took its toll. It is 1870, and while slavery has been abolished for five years, questions and economic concerns remain for these freed men, women and children. Coretta Scott King Honor Winner Jewell Parker Rhodes brings this tenuous time to life in Sugar.

 

The Beales, fellow sugar workers, have become her surrogate grandparents, and the other workers are protective of Sugar as the only child in their midst, yet barely tolerant of her rambunctious ways. As the community dwindles in number, Mr. Wills, the owner, needs more help and brings laborers in from China which initially concerns Sugar and her friends. But Sugar is quickly intrigued by these men and longs to make new friends from a foreign land outside of River Road.

 

As Sugar develops friendships with Billy Wills, the owner’s son, and the Chinese workers, she is exposed to worlds far different from her own. Billy lives a life of luxury, but is just a boy looking for adventures and a friend in Sugar. The Chinese men work hard but also share their traditional tales, food and toys. Rhodes deftly describes all of Sugar’s sensory experiences, while offering a realistic portrait of her hard realities and the unique cross-cultural community created for a time on this Mississippi plantation. Sugar is a most appealing and memorable heroine who manages to muster enough courage to step away from the only world she’s ever known in an effort to live her mother’s dying words of: Do. See. Feel.  —

Maureen