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Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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Maureen

Harper Lee, 1926-2016

posted by: February 19, 2016 - 12:15pm

Harper Lee 1926 - 2016Harper Lee, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of To Kill a Mockingbird, has died at the age of 89 in her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Born on April 28, 1926, Lee was educated in Alabama and at one time thought about becoming a lawyer, but moved to New York in 1949 to pursue her dream of becoming a writer.

 

It took nine years, but finally Lee’s manuscript was accepted and the book was published on July 11, 1960. Set in a small Southern town, Lee’s masterpiece tackles racial injustice and was met with critical acclaim and commercial success. The film adaptation starring Mary Badham as Scout and Gregory Peck as Atticus was equally sensational and only added to Harper Lee’s literary fame and expectations for her next novel. For decades, though, it appeared that Lee would never publish another book. That all changed in 2015 when a manuscript was mysteriously uncovered and Go Set a Watchman, the sequel to To Kill a Mockingbird, was the book of last summer.

 

Harper Lee suffered a stroke in 2007, recovered and resumed life in her beloved hometown which served as the model for the small town in To Kill a Mockingbird. In fact, when asked by a radio interviewer about her small corner of the world, Lee said, “I would simply like to put down all I know about this because I believe that there is something universal in this little world, something decent to be said for it and something to lament in its passing.” She continued, “In other words, all I want to be is the Jane Austen of South Alabama.”


 
 

Between the Covers with Shawn Stout

posted by: January 19, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for A Tiny Piece of SkyShawn Stout takes a break from her popular Penelope Crumb series to introduce young readers to Frankie Baum in her engaging new middle grade novel A Tiny Piece of Sky. It is 1939 in Hagerstown, Maryland, and Frankie Baum, the youngest of three sisters, is wondering if her German-born father really is a spy. Newbery Honor and National Book Award-winner, Kathi Appelt raves about this captivating coming-of-age story, “At turns hilarious, at turns heartbreaking, Shawn Stout’s story shows us the damage that a whisper campaign can do to a family and a community, and at the same time shows us, each of us, a way to find our hearts.”

 

Between the Covers: What was the inspiration behind A Tiny Piece of Sky?

 

Shawn Stout: A Tiny Piece of Sky was inspired by the lives of my grandparents, Albert and Mildred Beck, and their three daughters, in the 1930s. My grandfather, the son of German parents, was a restaurant owner and businessman in Hagerstown, Maryland, and amidst the post-WWI anti-German hysteria, he was falsely accused of being a Nazi spy. Following those accusations, there was an organized boycott of his restaurant, which sent him and my grandmother into a financial crisis and contributed to my grandfather’s early death.

 

I grew up listening to my mother’s stories about her family’s restaurant, about the rumors of espionage and about the boycott. Many decades later, after my grandmother died, we were cleaning out her apartment and found letters dated 1939 from local civic organizations, which voiced their support for my grandfather and his restaurant, and denounced the accusations that he was a German spy. I held onto those letters and knew that one day I would write about their story.

 

BTC: Frankie is Number Three, the youngest of three sisters and yet she is spunky and fun. Is her character autobiographical in any way? The sisterly relationships are so real. Did you draw on real life experience from your own family?

 

SS: Like Frankie, I’m a Number Three, so I do know what it feels like to be the last to do everything. (It doesn’t feel so great, let me tell you.) I certainly heard a lot of “No, you’re not old enough,” when I was a kid, so I can relate to Frankie’s frustrations. But that’s where our similarities end, I think. Frankie is much more adventurous than I was at her age, and she has a lot more gumption. Gumption. I love that word.

 

The relationship between the Baum sisters was really fun to write. I don’t think I consciously drew on any experiences from my own life, but it’s hard to say where things come from when I’m writing. Having an older brother and sister, though, has definitely helped shape who I am and made me sensitive to the dynamics between siblings.

 

BTC: You did an amazing job of capturing the feeling of life in a small city during the war. What kind of research did you do to create this authentic setting? What is your writing process like?

 

SS: Before I wrote a single word, I read a lot of books about pre-WWII era in the United States, and about anti-German sentiment and the super-patriotism of the time. I listened to radio broadcasts from the 1930s like “The Shadow” and dug up newsreels and local newspaper articles. I also interviewed family members and those few still living who worked at my grandparents’ restaurant in the 1930s. To get a feel for the place, I was able to find photographs dated 1938 of the restaurant and staff, as well as advertising postcards, matchbooks and an original menu.

 

My writing process is different for each book. For this one, I started out with the research and tried to immerse myself in the period. Then, once I felt as though I had enough of a handle on the time and place, I started writing. I knew I wanted to tell the story mostly through the youngest Baum’s eyes — Frankie’s — so I started with her character until I could find her voice. When I found it, the story started to take off.

 

BTC: One of the most impressive feats in this book is your ability to address injustice through Frankie’s eyes without preaching. So many children’s books seem to feel a need to teach a lesson and become didactic. How do you let the reader come to his/her own conclusion and avoid lecturing?

 

SS: That’s a great question. I try to stay inside my characters’ head as much as I can and let them react to what happens in the story as it unfolds. Honestly, as I’m writing, I’m rarely thinking about the reader — my focus is on the story and the characters — so the idea of teaching lessons or morals doesn’t ever occur to me. I learn so much about the world through my characters as I’m writing, so there’s no place for me, as the author, to preach to anyone.   

 

BTC: What were some of your favorite books as a child and what do you tell children who ask for advice on how to be a writer?

 

SS: My favorite book as a child was The Secret Garden, but I read everything I could get my hands on. I was also in love with Beverly Cleary’s Ramona series. I still am, actually.

 

BTC: Will you share with our readers some of your favorite things about living in Maryland?

 

SS: I grew up in Maryland and continue to love living here for many reasons — watching the seasons change, being close to both the mountains and the ocean and the Chesapeake Bay, and enjoying its eclectic cities. Maryland has so much to offer. I’ve lived here all my life and still haven’t explored everything.

 

 

BTC: What can your fans look forward to next?

 

SS: I’m working on a new middle grade novel, but it’s too early in the process to talk about it in very much detail. I will say that it has to do with a lonely girl, an unkindness of ravens and a bit of old magic.


 
 

ALA Youth Media Awards Announced

posted by: January 11, 2016 - 11:30am

Cover art for Finding WinnieCover art for Last Stop on Market StreetCover art for Gone Crazy in AlabamaThe most prestigious awards for teen and children's literature were announced by the American Library Association in Boston earlier this morning. Awards were given in a wide range of categories that covered all formats and age levels. A complete list of awards, winners and honorees can be found here.

 

The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children. This year’s winner is Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World's Most Famous Bear written by Lindsay Mattick and illustrated by Sophie Blackall. Blackall's warm gouache-and-ink illustrations complement this story of the real bear who inspired the creation of the beloved Winnie-the-Pooh. Caldecott Honor winners include Trombone Shorty written by Troy Andrews and illustrated by Bryan Collier, Waiting written and illustrated by Kevin Henkes, Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer: Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement illustrated by Ekua Holmes and written by Carole Boston Weatherford and Last Stop on Market Street written by Matt de la Pena and illustrated by Christine Robinson.

 

The oldest of the medals awarded, the John Newbery Medal, is awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children. This year’s medal recipient is Matt de la Pena for Last Stop on Market Street, a picture book illustrated by Christine Robinson sharing the simple story of a young boy riding the bus with his grandmother and learning to find the beauty in everyday things.  Three books were selected as Honor winners: The War that Saved My Life by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley, Roller Girl by Victoria Jamieson and Echo by Pam Munoz Ryan.

 

The Michael L. Printz Award annually honors the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit. This year’s winner is Bone Gap by Laura Ruby. Ruby blends mystery, romance and magical realism and draws the reader into this place and the story of Finn, an eighteen-year-old outsider who is the only witness to an abduction. Printz Honor awards went to Out of Darkness by Ashley Hope Perez and Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick.

 

The Coretta Scott King Awards are given to outstanding African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate an appreciation of African American culture and universal human values.  Bryan Collier received the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award for his vibrant mixed media collages which bring to life the story of author Troy Andrews who shares his childhood dream of becoming a musician. Rita Williams-Garcia, one of the authors selected for this year’s inaugural BCReads, was awarded the Coretta Scott King Author Award for Gone Crazy in Alabama, the final installment in the heartwarming Gaither family series that began with One Crazy Summer. Congratulations also to local author, Ronald L. Smith, author of Hoodoo, for winning the Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award. Be sure to read more about our hometown winner in our interview with Smith earlier this year. 


 
 

The Rogue Not Taken

posted by: January 5, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Rogue Not TakenBestselling author Sarah MacLean brings TMZ to pre-Victorian times in The Rogue Not Taken, the first in her new Scandal & Scoundrel series. Lady Sophie Talbot preferred life as a commoner, but when her father’s success secured him an earldom she was thrust into the highest echelons of London society. Sophie shies from the spotlight until her philandering brother-in-law causes her to create a very public scene and earn the scorn of the aristocracy. Think along the lines of the Beyonce/Jay Z/Solange elevator incident and you’ve got the picture.

 

Vowing to leave London, she stows away in the carriage of Kingscote, the Marquess of Eversley. King is a charmer with an ill-deserved (but welcome) reputation as a rake. When Sophie is discovered, King is sure that she is trying to trick him into marriage despite her avowal that he is the last man she would ever marry. Sophie asks King to take her to her childhood home claiming a lost love is waiting for her. While he is disbelieving, he agrees to give her a ride.   

 

This will turn out to be the journey of a lifetime for these two who are at odds from the beginning and continue to snipe along the way. Yet when trouble strikes, they have each other’s backs and slowly the bickering turns to flirtatious banter and the sparks begin to fly. This compelling story is enhanced by MacLean’s fast-paced storytelling, clever dialogue and sharp wit. Sophie and King are clearly drawn, engaging characters whose emotional connection is palpable. This intense romantic journey is peppered with comedy and action while also serving as a cutting commentary on pre-Victorian upper class society.


 
 

The Marriage Pact

posted by: December 22, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Marriage PactIt’s Marci Thompson’s Big 3-0, and her life on this milestone birthday isn’t at all what she envisioned in M.J. Pullen’s debut The Marriage Pact. Instead of a successful career, a handsome husband, a couple of kids and a dream home, Marci is working a temp accounting job, having an affair with Doug, her married boss, and living in what used to be a motel room. But then Jake, one of her closest friends from back home in Atlanta, sends her a picture of a cocktail napkin contract the two of them drunkenly signed 10 years ago — they would get married if both were still single at 30.

 

The reappearance of this pact shakes Marci’s belief in her feelings for Doug, who is promising to leave his wife and start a real life with Marci. She puts Jake on the back burner, but is crushed when Doug unceremoniously dumps her because his wife is pregnant. While trying to stay strong at work, the depth of her pain is severe, and she finally realizes she needs to make big changes in her life to alter the bleakness of her future. She moves back to Atlanta where she has the support of family and friends, including Jake.  

 

Jake is ready to pick up where they left off, but Marci's heart is still recovering. The two take baby steps toward a real relationship and even get engaged, but have they really grown up? This is a fast-paced, funny read with likeable and charming characters who readers will look forward to meeting again as Pullen adds to this appealing series. Fans of Emily Giffin, Lauren Graham and Jennifer Weiner will delight in a new author to add to their list of favorites.

 


 
 

HAPPY 100TH Birthday, Frank Sinatra!

posted by: December 8, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sinatra the ChairmanDecember 12 marks the 100th anniversary of Frank Sinatra’s birth, and three new books celebrate his legacy. Ol’ Blue Eyes remains an iconic figure in American culture with his mystique enduring long after his death in 1998.

 

Sinatra the Chairman by James Kaplan is a detailed examination of the life and career of this legendary performer. By delving into his complex relationships and prolific career, Kaplan exposes the multi-faceted layers that made this man —singer, actor, mogul, friend and lover. This is the follow-up to 2010’s Frank: The Voice and picks up in 1954, after Sinatra won an Academy Award and was firmly re-entrenched as a top selling recording artist.Cover art for Why Sinatra Matters

 

Award-winning author Pete Hamill’s Why Sinatra Matters was first published in 1999 and is being re-issued in time for the anniversary of Sinatra’s birth, along with a new introduction from the author. This book serves as both a unique homage and an insightful portrait of a complex man. Hamill’s beautifully written portrait brings to life a man whose entertaining touched so many generations. 

 

Cover art for Frank & Ava: in Love and WarFrank & Ava: In Love and War by John Brady fully explores this volatile relationship which shaped both their lives. Ava had two short-lived marriages behind her and a succession of high profile suitors when she and Frank met. The spark was instantaneous and the two began a tempestuous affair, despite Frank’s marriage which ended soon after in divorce. Frank and Ava’s subsequent marriage was a series of fights, separations and reconciliations which ultimately ended in divorce. Despite the not-so-happy ending, Brady’s exploration of this glamorous couple is compelling. Gossip columnist Liz Smith said of this duo, "If I had to go back in Hollywood history and name two people who were most desperately and passionately in love with each other, I would say Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardner were it." 

 

Want more? Check out this list of music, movies and more books featuring the Chairman of the Board.
 


 
 

National Book Award Winners

posted by: November 19, 2015 - 2:53pm

Cover art for Between the World and MeCover art for Fortune SmilesBaltimore native Ta-Nehisi Coates capped a remarkable year last night when he won the National Book Award for nonfiction for Between the World and Me, a frank narrative outlining his experience as a black man in America. Coates received a standing ovation from the crowd at Cipriani Wall Street and told the audience, “I wanted to make racism tactile, visceral. Because it is.” Coates wrote the memoir as a letter to his teenage son and dedicated last night’s award to Prince Jones, a classmate from Howard University who was killed by a police officer while unarmed. Coates’ award-winning title has been selected as the adult nonfiction title in Baltimore County’s inaugural community-wide read, BC Reads, coming in April.

 

Adam Johnson won the fiction award for Fortune Smiles, a collection of short stories dealing with a wide range of global subjects. The award for young people’s literature was given to Neal Shusterman’s Challenger Deep, a novel about a mentally ill teenager inspired by Shusterman’s son. Robin Coste Lewis won the poetry award for her debut collection Voyage of the Sable Venus, an exploration of race, gender and identity.

 

The National Book Award, which was established in 1950, has been awarded to some of the country’s most celebrated authors, including William Faulkner, Cormac McCarthy and Lillian Hellman. Presented by the National Book Foundation, the awards were open to American authors who published books from December 1, 2014, to November 30, 2015. The prizes were presented at a black-tie dinner, and all four winners will receive $10,000. Watch the entire ceremony, including all of the winners' acceptance speeches on Ustream.


 
 

Between the Covers with Trevor Pryce

posted by: November 10, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Rainbow SerpentGet to know former Baltimore Raven Trevor Pryce, a man of many talents — including writing and producing — as he talks about his popular Kulipari series of books for kids, soon to be a Netflix animated series. Learn more about the Kulipari and this fantastical world on the Kulipari website. The third book in the series, Amphibian’s End, is out now, and Trevor shares his thoughts on writing, living in Maryland, upcoming projects and, of course, playing for the Ravens.

 

Between the Covers: The Kulipari trilogy is such a fun blend of adventure, magic, the natural world and animals. What inspired you to create this fantastical land? And why frogs versus scorpions?
Trevor Pryce: I grew up in the '80s, a fan of Star Wars, X-Men and Transformers. And I remember being so wrapped up in the stories and how deep they went. The worlds seemed real to me because of the depth of the ideas. That never left me. When I got older I also found myself drawn to studying different parts of the world and civilizations. I visited Australia once and have never forgotten the experience. Aboriginal culture was one that I latched onto because I love the art and their mystic ways.

 

I grew up in Florida, and frogs weren’t my favorite of nature’s offerings. However, poisonous frogs were fascinating. Their bright colors make them almost whimsical, yet they are actually the deadliest creatures on the planet. So I put the fun side and the strong side together to create the world of the Kulipari in my books.
    

Kulipari as a word actually translates into the word “poison” in an Aboriginal dialect. Bringing frogs to my version of the Outback was a lot to mix together, but readers love the books so it works well. I continue to play with Aboriginal themes such as the Rainbow Serpent, The Land and more.

 

Photo of Trevor Pryce (Wikipedia Commons)BTC: How does the battle for the Amphibilands compare to a Ravens-Steelers game?
TP: Funny. In a Ravens-Steelers game, we all shake hands afterwards and all of the players are cordial. In the battle for the Amphibilands, there’s no “Good game” afterward. There’s no mutual respect. There’s only a winner…and a loser. And the loser faces death. Wait…then maybe it is like a Ravens-Steelers game! [laughs]

 

BTC: The illustrations by acclaimed artist Sanford Greene do so much to support the storytelling and bring this magical place to life. Describe the process of working with an illustrator and how it impacts your own writing process.    
TP: There’s a secret I’ll let you in on. Kulipari was written as a movie first. So it was always meant to be told visually. I was acting as a director would. There were ideas and themes that I wanted the readers to not have to imagine — things that would be come back later in the story. So although I like the power of imagination, there were some parts I didn’t want the readers to make up themselves. Like the “Poison” found in the characters and them glowing because of it. There’s a very specific way that I saw that in my mind so I wanted the readers to see the same way. I think if you had read the Star Wars movie script and saw the description of Darth Vadar, in your mind I doubt what you saw would have matched what George Lucas brought to life.  
  

I also put a lot of work into the design of the characters. The Amphibilands was another point of emphasis. Sanford helped me envision everything. He’s an incredible artist and by the time we got to book three, I didn’t have to tell him much or give any direction at all.

 

BTC: Why kids’ books? How have your own children influenced your writing?
TP: Before I wrote Kulipari, I had written a drama for ABC television, submitted storied to the The New York Times, NBC.com and other Hollywood outlets. I kept coming back to my son, who is now 9 years old. He had TVs in our house on whenever he wanted to. So Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Ninjago, Marvel, etc.  A writer is usually a product of his influences and surroundings. And my son surrounded me with the things he loved. If my daughters ran the TVs in the house, I would have likely written my own version of Twilight.
    

With kids’ properties, they live on forever, if they’re good. There’s always new 10-, 11-, 12-year-olds. It’s the reason why Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles keeps being re-booted.

 

BTC: What were some of your favorite books when you were a child?    
TP: When I was a kid there was Batman, Star Wars and ShaZam and the rest. My favorite book as a kid was called The Hooples Horrible Holiday.

 

BTC: Congratulations on the trilogy becoming a Netflix series (arriving next year). How involved will you be in production? Do you have any other news you can share about the series?
TP: Thanks! The Netflix series is in production now. The first season is 13 episodes. Seven of them are done. It looks pretty fantastic. I serve as the creator and executive producer. I picked everything. The music, the designs and the story the way I wanted to tell it.  It’s a labor of love.

 

Right now I’m writing the the prequel story, The Hidingwar trilogy that tells the story of Darel’s father Apari, and the formation of the Amphibilands after Terra Australis and the Poison Scrolls. I’m really, really excited about that one. They will be live action movies in theaters around 2018.

 

BTC: What other books or projects do you have that we can look forward to?
TP: Kulipari: Battalions, the mobile game, is available now for IOS and Android. It’s a tower defense game in the vein of Clash of Clans or Game of War. It’s really, really cool. You can pick either Frogs or Scorpions and build your army. In the future, we are going to add Spiders and Turtles. And this month, the release of book three in the series Amphibian’s End!

    
Mattel has made a series of toys that go with the game that give in-game upgrades. Really, really cool. And Under Armour is making Kulipari Gear starting with limited edition T-shirts available now. Very limited quantities of course.
    
There’s going to be a fourth book in the series called Kulipari: A Lord Rises, which picks up after Amphibian’s End. Burnu is also getting a comic book called Kulipari: Heritage, as he’s the Kulipari version of Wolverine and will set out on his own adventure.
    
Also be on the lookout for Kulipari: Dreamwalker on Xbox One and PS4 next fall.

 

BTC: You were such an important part of the Ravens’ number 1 ranked defense. Can you share some of your favorite moments or games during your time as a member of Ravens Nation with our readers? How do Baltimore fans rank compared to fans from other cities you played in?
TP: I think the biggest thing I can share about that was the fact that my family and I decided to stay in this area. We live in Howard County and love it here. My kids were all born in Denver and, if not for playing for the Ravens, we would still be living there. And although Denver is great, it isn’t the DMV [D.C./Maryland/Virginia area]. And we are so grateful that a place like this exists. Everything about it.
    

So I would say I have the Ravens to thank for that. We would have never looked at Baltimore as a viable place to raise our children and set roots if not for me playing here. It’s a great organization, yes, but it’s even better as a part of the country. I’ve told everyone I know that they should move here.
    

Really, at the end of the day, I played for three cities, and my biggest compliment is that when football is over, where do the players go when they retire? I went here. I stayed here. I didn’t stay in this part of the world because it was just the last place where I played. I stayed because I love it. And there’s no better thing I can say than that. Really. And that’s my favorite memory. Because every day it keeps giving.


 
 

Carnegie Medal Longlist Announced

posted by: September 30, 2015 - 11:00am

Carnegie MedalThe longlists for the Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Nonfiction were announced yesterday, and 20 outstanding titles have made each list. Congratulations to Baltimore’s own Anne Tyler, whose A Spool of Blue Thread made the fiction list, while another Baltimore native, Ta-Nehisi Coates, was selected for the nonfiction list with Between the World and Me. It’s been a very good year for Coates, who is also on the National Book Award longlist and was named a 2015 MacArthur Fellow on Monday.

 

The Carnegie committee is a joint project between RUSA, a division of the American Library Association, and Booklist. A shortlist will be announced on October 19, and the winners will be announced on January 10, 2016.


 
 

Ally Hughes Has Sex Sometimes

posted by: September 30, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Ally Hughes Has Sex SometimesAlly Hughes Has Sex Sometimes by Jules Moulin first introduces readers to Ally when she is 31 and struggling to balance her career as a professor with the demands of single motherhood. In addition to her 10-year-old daughter Lizzie, Ally also has to reckon with her interfering and frequently disapproving mother. Needless to say, there is no room for dating, romance or even a casual fling in her life.

 

But one weekend Ally has her house to herself and finds herself alone with Jake, a 21-year-old former student who has volunteered to make some needed repairs to her home. Their chemistry is palpable and Ally gives in to a steamy weekend of passion. As the weekend draws to a close, Jake wants to pursue a lasting relationship, but Ally sends him packing. Flash forward 10 years and Ally is still single, living in Brooklyn and coping with the recent death of her mother. Lizzie, an aspiring actress, brings home a co-worker for dinner who turns out to be Jake, now a Hollywood mega-star. Ally panics because she has never forgotten him or their magical weekend and Jake’s memories are equally vivid. Their attraction still sizzles and Ally must decide if she is willing to give their relationship a real chance.

 

Moulin effortlessly weaves between the two time lines and brings a real spark to this star-crossed couple. Jake and Ally are honest and relatable characters whose happily ever after is 10 years in the making. Supporting characters, zany plot lines and zippy dialogue are the perfect complements to this funny, romantic and sexy story.


 
 

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