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Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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A Little Bit Country

A Little Bit Country

posted by:
October 29, 2012 - 6:45am

City Girl, Country VetLondon veterinarian Maz Harwood is out of work, unlucky in love, and in need of a home when her best friend Emma asks her to fill in at her vet practice in City Girl, Country Vet by Cathy Woodman.  While Maz dreads the doldrums of the country, she wants to help her friend who is taking a six month leave of absence. Maz accepts the offer thinking that a change of scenery is just what the doctor ordered to help heal her recently broken heart.

 

Maz thought the hardest part of the move would be trading in her heels for wellies. She quickly learns that country life is anything but uneventful and the people are definitely not boring. There are the unwelcoming locals who are suspicious of the newcomer. There is the town’s only other vet practice which is determined to destroy any competition. There is the fact that Emma’s practice is in dire financial straits. And of course, there is the handsome son of the rival vet who is most unsuitable, particularly when Maz has sworn off romance.

 

As Maz learns to navigate the perilous politics of country life, she encounters seemingly insurmountable obstacles in her quest to win over the locals, save the lives of her patients, and keep Emma’s practice alive. From rescuing animals from a burning building to dealing with the resentment following her failure to save a beloved pet, Maz has her hands full and is ready to flee back to the comfort of the city. Readers will be transported to a delightful small town and enjoy the slow pace of life in this warm, breezy, romantic comedy with plenty of adorable four-legged friends.

 

Maureen

 
 

Hail to the Chief

Hail to the Chief

posted by:
October 24, 2012 - 6:55am

Presidential PetsThe President's Stuck in the BathtubPresidential politics are in full swing as Election Day approaches and two new books for kids offer a lighter look at the men who have been elected to this highest office. Julia Moberg researched the non-human First Family members in Presidential Pets: The Weird, Wacky, Little, Big, Scary, Strange Animals That Have Lived in the White House. While many had the usual cats and dogs, the White House also became home to goats, mice, bears, zebras, hyenas, and many more. Calvin Coolidge owned a raccoon named Rebecca who dined on shrimp, while Andrew Jackson’s parrot was known to use less than savory language. Each entry opens with a humorous rhyming poem that describes an event with the pet. Sidebars, such as "Presidential Stats" and "Tell Me More", offer basic information and share trivia about the president and his animal. This unique blend of humor, trivia, vibrant graphics, and children’s love of animals brings to life the presidents and the history of each man’s time in office.

  

Susan Katz uses humor in The President’s Stuck in the Bathtub: Poems about the Presidents and focuses on some of the lesser known anecdotes about our presidents. The forty-three poems are diverse in format and include concrete, free verse, and rhyming. Each poem is accompanied by a footnote outlining more specifics, and Robert Neubecker’s digital caricature illustrations are full of interesting details which highlight the stories. While trivial in nature, these funny facts are just right to pique young readers' interests. Further information is provided in the appended list of presidents which includes nicknames, a major accomplishment, and a famous quote. From William Taft’s extrication from a bathtub to John Quincy Adams skinny dipping in the Potomac, all of these stories serve to highlight the human nature of each of our presidents, and makes them more relatable to readers of all ages.

Maureen

 
 

There’s No Place Like Home

There’s No Place Like Home

posted by:
October 22, 2012 - 7:15am

The Soldier's WifeBritish Major Dan Riley is returning home to his family after a six month tour of duty in Afghanistan in The Soldier’s Wife, by Joanna Trollope. International bestseller Trollope uses her sixteenth novel to explore the issue of military re-entry and its ripple effect on family members.

 

Dan is returned safely to his wife, Alexa, their three-year-old twins, and his stepdaughter Isabel, but he struggles to adjust. On the surface his family seems to support him, including his proud father and grandfather, both retired military men.  But underneath, tensions are boiling.  Alexa has been offered an exciting teaching position which she cannot accept because of Dan’s likely promotion and yet another move. Isabel is in boarding school, the only good option for the transient military families, and is miserable and running away. And Dan is spending all his time on the base, unable to break the bonds he forged during battle and unwilling to communicate and open up to his wife.

 

Soon everyone who knows the Riley family is trying to help them save their marriage, but it’s up to Alexa to decide if she can sacrifice her needs and those of her family to support Dan’s commitment to his work. And Dan needs to learn to share emotionally with his wife in an effort to bridge the distance between them. Trollope illuminates the complexities of modern life in this story of a family striving to balance duty and ambition. With her signature cast of universally appealing, multigenerational characters, The Soldier's Wife is a timely and nuanced look into the lives of soldiers, their families, and their homecomings from the front lines.

 

Maureen

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Six Degrees of Celebrity

Hello Goodbye HelloCraig Brown tackles the world of celebrities and their fascinating encounters with one another in Hello Goodbye Hello: a Circle of 101 Remarkable Meetings. Brilliant in conception, with each vignette comprised of exactly 1,001 words, Brown entertains the reader with amusing anecdotes of how the celebrated and gifted interacted. Some of the meetings are unlikely and many are just plain weird.

 

From an opening story in which Adolf Hitler is knocked down by a careless English driver in 1931, to the Duchess of Windsor’s meeting with the Fuhrer over tea, and throughout the ninety-nine tales in between, this book is proof that truth is stranger than fiction. Brown employs a chain-link structure to his narrative so one encounter smoothly leads directly into the next one. Some meet-ups are delightfully pleasant as between mutual admirers Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain. Less successful encounters include Groucho Marx trying to impress T.S. Eliot by quoting his poetry, and Eliot commenting that he was familiar with his own work and didn’t need a recitation. And a last group of meetings are miserable failures, including one between literary pair James Joyce and Marcel Proust, who barely spoke to one another. Brown, a BBC Radio host and Daily Mail columnist, delivers an absorbing, humorous collection of snapshots in the lives of famed personalities.  For readers unfamiliar with some of the characters at play in this circle, Brown provides brief biographies. His snarky asides and enlightening footnotes add to the stories of these often incongruous, sometimes poignant, but always entertaining meetings.  

Maureen

 
 

Silent Killer

Breathing RoomInvincible MicrobeTuberculosis has been called the greatest serial killer of all time, and remains a crisis in many countries. Two new books for children tackle this scourge and shed light on the incredible pain suffered by its victims and the horrors of treatment.

 

In 1940, thirteen year old Evelyn (“Evvy") Hoffmeister is sent to Loon Lake Sanatorium, a treatment facility for tuberculosis patients in Breathing Room by Marsha Hayles. Evvy is frightened by her new surroundings and must learn to adapt to the harsh rules – no talking, no visitors, strict bed rest. Evvy soon finds her place and makes friends with the other girls in her ward. Hayles provides a fascinating glimpse into the medical technology of the day, such as the pneumothorax which blew air into the chest, or thoracoplasty, the surgical removal of a rib which would supposedly allow a lung to collapse and heal. Period photographs add depth to the story and an author’s note provides additional information. Evvy’s voice captures the resentment, fear, determination, and hope of a young patient fighting an insidious disease with no real cure.

 

Evvy could very well be one of the young ladies pictured in the dramatic cover photograph of Jim Murphy’s Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never Ending Search for a Cure. This is an impeccably researched narrative nonfiction title complete with photographs, prints, and source notes. Murphy starts with the history of this deadly germ and offers evidence of tuberculosis in a 500,000 year old fossilized skull. Murphy also details the many ineffectual treatments in ancient Egypt and Greece before following the course of the dread disease through Europe and America. Finally, readers learn of the social history and impact of tuberculosis. Examples include chapters describing the warped nineteenth-century romantic view of the disease, and the difficulties encountered by African-Americans and immigrants in their search for treatment. The research, photographs, notes and easy narrative flow make this biography of a disease a fascinating read.

Maureen

 
 

Going to the Chapel

Going to the Chapel

posted by:
October 12, 2012 - 7:15am

Happily Ever AfterThere Goes the BrideThe best laid plans often go awry and two new takes on the quest for wedded bliss illustrate that with romance and humor. Readers meet the delightful yet jaded Eleanor Bee at various junctures in her life in Harriet Evans’ Happily Ever After. Eleanor is certain that she wants to move to London, become a literary superstar, and be financially secure. She is equally convinced that happy endings don’t exist in real life. Eleanor saw what divorce did to her parents, especially her mum. At twenty-two, she starts ticking items off her checklist when she moves to London and gets a job at a small publishing house. But she also unexpectedly falls in love. Fast forward ten years and Elle’s life has changed completely. She lives in New York where she works as a highly successful editor, but is her belief about no happy endings really going to be her destiny?

 

Holly McQueen offers the stories of Polly, Bella, and Grace in There Goes the Bride. Polly calls off her wedding with only a week to spare and no explanation to her older sister, Bella or her best friend, Grace. Bella is bossy, but means well as she tries to fix Polly’s problems while dealing with her own frazzled life. Bella is unable to conceive and is starting the adoption process, but her boyfriend is decidedly less invested in the idea. Grace is beautiful and seems to have it all with a husband and two adorable children, but in reality her husband is absent and demeaning. When Grace meets her husband’s handsome boss, their instant attraction soon turns into a full-blown affair. As these three women deal with their respective issues, readers will relish the exploits, friendship, and growth of this dynamic trio.  

 

Maureen

 
 

Marcia, Marcia, Marcia

Loving Lady MarciaHere’s the story of three golden-haired sisters and their mother, and three handsome young men and their architect father who make up the House of Brady. Yes, USA Today best-selling author and RITA finalist Kieran Kramer tackles The Brady Bunch in her newest romance series, getting the ball rolling with the eldest daughter in the fabulous Loving Lady Marcia.

 

On her 16th birthday, Lady Marcia Sherwood was seduced by Finn Lattimore who then fled to America.  Believing his brother, Duncan, the Earl of Chadwick to be behind Finn’s sudden departure, Marcia swears off love and devotes herself to a life of teaching. Five years later Marcia has advanced to the position of Headmistress at Oak Hall Academy and is in London when she crosses paths with Duncan.  At the same time, Finn returns from America (one step ahead of a cuckolded husband) and both brothers are set on courting her.  Duncan is surprised at the independent and beautiful woman Marcia has become, and Finn is still handsome and charming, although his motives are questionable. When Marcia loses her position at Oak Hall, she returns to the comfort of her family who is delighted at this turn of events and hopeful that marriage is in her future.   

 

Marcia is initially pleased by the attentions of Finn, but startled by the growing and fierce attraction she feels for Duncan. However, her priority is to get her old job back. But is she really ready to forget her dreams of true love? This is a delightful tale featuring a strong heroine and a noble hero, a touch of humor, and of course a most interesting and loving family.  Devotees of the original TV series will be happy to see both Alice and Tiger, and thrill to the memory of the football hitting Marcia's nose.

Maureen

 
 

Make it Work

Make it Work

posted by:
September 27, 2012 - 6:03am

Project Runway: The Show That Changed HistoryTim Gunn's Fashion BibleProject Runway is wrapping up its tenth season, and this landmark program featuring aspiring fashion designers is as popular today as when it first started. In the first full-color program guide, Project Runway: The Show That Changed History, all nine seasons are represented. Featuring hundreds of pictures of the hosts, designers, fashions, and more, this is the ultimate fan source. In addition to the photographs, there are highlights of seasons past, and interviews with designers, stars, and judges. Go behind the scenes of a television and fashion institution and learn how the show began and evolved over the years, and discover what some of the fan favorites are up to today. Enjoy commentary from host Heidi Klum throughout, as well as interviews with the behind-the-scenes crew and producers, top designers, judges, and of course, Tim Gunn.

 

And speaking of Mr. Gunn, Project Runway’s mentor and fan favorite offers a fashion-related title in Tim Gunn’s Fashion Bible:The Fascinating History of Everything in Your Closet. Gunn is also the chief creative officer of Liz Claiborne and a former faculty member and chair of fashion design at Parsons' New School for Design. He shares his impressive fashion knowledge and presents an exhaustive history of clothing and accessory. From suits to sportswear, jeans to Crocs, Gunn surveys Western fashion and recounts the contributions to the way we dress and accessorize, and highlights revolutionary designers. In tracing the origin of our closets, Gunn combines his trademark sense of humor with a personable tone. This comprehensive volume not only informs, but serves as a reminder that while fashion is about fun and innovation, the quickly changing dynamics and fickle consumers lead to designers being in one day and out the next.

Maureen

 
 

Catonsville Confidential

Catonsville Confidential

posted by:
September 26, 2012 - 7:11am

The Secret TreeAraminta (Minty) Fresh lives in the familiar setting of Catonsville in The Secret Tree by Natalie Standiford. Growing up in a close-knit neighborhood with her best friend Paz on the same block, she is happy and comfortable with her friends, family, and roller derby. But the summer before middle school is a season for change, not the least of which is Paz’s apparent desire to befriend some cool girls. 

 

When she spots a flash in the woods and chases it, Minty not only finds a new friend in Raymond, but also stumbles across the Secret Tree. The elm has a hollow trunk in which Raymond and Minty find secrets written on slips of paper. The notes hold confidences which range from crushes, to being held back a grade, to placing a curse on an enemy! Seems like her neighborhood is full of secrets and mysteries and Minty and Raymond decide to start finding some answers.

 

But this detecting duo has secrets of their own, and as they investigate friends and neighbors they must each deal with their own anxieties. Minty is a delightfully relatable yet quirky heroine with the right touch of tween snark to make her real. In the end, this story of changing friendships and pesky sibling relationships is about growing up and realizing that everyone has insecurities. Filled with the warmth and freedom of summer and a neighborhood full of unique characters, this imaginative coming-of-age story has an old-fashioned charm which will have wide appeal.

 

Be sure to look for Natalie at the Baltimore Book Festival on Saturday, September 29th at 5:30, where she’ll be appearing as a member of the panel, "Baltimore Bred", with fellow Baltimore natives Adam Gidwitz, Laurel Snyder, C. Alexander London, and Laura Resau to talk about how growing up in Baltimore influenced their work.

Maureen

 
 

American Horror Story

American Horror Story

posted by:
September 24, 2012 - 7:15am

BreedNational Book Award nominee Scott Spencer tackles the emotionally charged world of fertility treatments in Breed, written under his pseudonym, Chase Novak. Alex and Leslie Twisden lead the ultimate in charmed lives with wonderful jobs, a beautiful home on Manhattan’s Upper East Side, and a loving marriage. The only thing missing in their picture perfect world is the pitter-patter of little feet, and each unsuccessful infertility treatment ratchets up their desperation for a baby. When they hear of a miracle doctor in Slovenia named Dr. Kis who has helped other couples with his fertility enhancement, they immediately hop on a plane. Alex and Leslie don’t think twice about undergoing the treatment which turns out to be an unusual and painful procedure. That pain is quickly overlooked, when Leslie becomes pregnant with twins and their family is complete. But at what price? 

 

Fast-forward ten years, and we meet Adam and Alice, the adored twins, who are much loved but are also becoming more aware of some strange goings-on in their house. They are locked in their rooms at night and hear disturbing and violent sounds coming from their parents' bedroom. Fear leads the twins to run away and find out what is really happening to their parents. They are on a quest to find Dr. Kis and get answers to their questions. But even as they seek to discover what really happened during that fateful time in Slovenia, their family and very existence are threatened.

 

This fast-paced story is sometimes gory but always thrilling, and readers looking for more will be happy to learn that Spencer/Novak is hard at work on a sequel – Brood. To get a sense of the high creepy factor throughout this book, check out Entertainment Weekly’s exclusive look at Breed’s book trailer here.  

Maureen