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Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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The Mysteries of History

The Anatomist's WifeIndia BlackTravel back to 1830s Scotland and meet Lady Keira Darby, the young widow at the center of Anna Lee Huber’s gothic debut The Anatomist’s Wife. Keira has been living a quiet life in the secluded castle of her sister and brother-in-law since her husband’s death eighteen months ago. She is recovering from the scandal that she starred in when it was revealed that she illustrated the corpses her husband dissected. But a house party brings the titled society elite to her hiding place, and Kiera is forced to face her past. When one of the guests is murdered, the past bubbles up and all fingers point to Keira. The authorities are several days away and her brother-in-law asks her to help new inquiry agent Sebastian Gage in the investigation. As the two work together, they must deal with danger, lies, and of course a little bit of romance.

  

While waiting for the next Lady Darby Mystery, enjoy the company of India Black, a saucy, young brothel owner whose business caters to England’s finest civil servants and military men. India Black by Carol Carr introduces this feisty heroine who finds herself in deep trouble when a War Office official dies while visiting one of her employees. She is blackmailed by another British agent, Mr. French, into helping recover important military papers lost at her establishment. The future of Britain is at stake and India is quickly embroiled in a deadly game of intrigue involving diabolical Russian agents. India and French soon find themselves fending off attempts on their lives and fighting their growing attraction. This unique heroine adds to a strong mystery, and the good news for avid readers is that India Black and the Widow of Windsor is on shelves now and India Black and the Shadows of Anarchy is due in January.

 

Maureen

 
 

Man's Best Friend

Underwater DogsPuppyhoodSeth Casteel, award-winning pet photographer and animal rights activist, presents amazing images of over eighty dogs in aquatic settings in Underwater Dogs. Each canine has an individual portrait which captures the unique personalities in exuberant action shots chasing a ball. From the human perspective, this game of chase seems simple – ball is thrown, dog retrieves it, and surfaces triumphantly. But beneath the water, there is a major drama playing out complete with bared teeth and arched bodies.  From leaping lab to diving dachshund, each dog approaches this game a little differently.  Some lounge in the water and paddle slowly, while others are aggressive and shark-like in their focus and determination. Of course, the elegant poodle still manages to maintain an air of refinement even when soaked. Casteel started this project by posting the photos on his blog, and since that time the viewership has surpassed 150 million.  

 

Who doesn’t love puppies? Photographer J. Nichole Smith offers photographs of twenty-five different baby canines in Puppyhood: Life-size Portraits of Puppies at 6 Weeks Old. The coffee table size allows the puppies to be shown in full actual life size at six weeks. These engaging photographs show all the details that make puppies so irresistible, from their pink bellies and tiny teeth to their soft ears and oversize paws. The book features purebred and mixed breed doggies in a variety of puppy pastimes such as sleeping, staring down the photographer, and of course, playing. All of the photographs will have readers yearning for their own puppy to cuddle. And indeed that is part of Smith’s plan, as her epilogue is complete with information on adopting all of the twenty-five pictured pooches, as well as providing contact information for a number of national shelter networks and the breeders of the purebreeds featured in the book.

Maureen

 
 

Here Comes the Hostage Taker

Here Comes the Hostage Taker

posted by:
November 30, 2012 - 8:30am

Love BombSomething old, something new, something borrowed, something explosive? In Love Bomb by Lisa Zeidner, Tess and Gabe’s wedding is hijacked by a rifle-wielding woman wearing a strapless white wedding gown. Her ensemble is completed with an antique gas mask and a small bomb strapped to her arm. Tess and Gabe wanted a simple home wedding with close family and friends. Tess’s mother, Helen, had the usual worries of weather and food that accompany hosting such an important event.  And of course, the guest list was a bit tricky as it included bitter exes, jealous girlfriends, and way too many psychiatrists. But those wedding day worries pale in comparison to the hostage drama that unfolds.

 

As the players in this theater, the wedding guests realize that this woman is seeking revenge for love lost. The guests each wrack their brains to try and seek a connection with the masked woman, and soon are confessing secrets and sins in the hopes of placating the “love terrorist.” Among the confessors are the bride’s thrice-married father, her recently divorced brother, and the groom’s sister’s movie-star boyfriend who is no stranger to stalkers. All of the psychiatrists try to take over the situation and talk to the hostage taker, but it is Helen who creates a bond with her and begins to pick up clues as to the woman’s identity. 

 

The reader learns of Crystal’s (the hostage taker) sad story before the wedding guests, and her motives are almost understandable. Despite the heavy artillery and potential for bloodshed, this is a comedy of manners about love gone horribly wrong. The hostages’ stories about failed love are the centerpiece of this story and are entertaining, depressing, and pathetic. This satirical story about the infinite varieties of passion and heartbreak reaches a tender, satisfying, and surprising conclusion. 

 

Maureen

 
 

Behind Mansion Walls

Behind Mansion Walls

posted by:
November 27, 2012 - 9:01am

The InnocentsSisters Charlie and Alice Flaherty are The Innocents in Lili Peloquin’s gripping debut that mixes a splash of The Great Gatsby with a dash of Gossip Girl. The duo arrives in posh Serenity Point, a beach town on the Connecticut coastline to spend the summer before heading off to boarding school. Their lives have changed drastically, and a mansion in Serenity Point is a long way from their tiny apartment in Cambridge. But in the span of just a few months, their parents divorced, their father moved across the globe, and their mother married the uber-rich Richard Flood.

 

The sisters approach their new life differently. Alice, the elder by one year, is more introspective, while Charlie is a free spirit looking for fun. Charlie becomes fast friends with the hard-partying, maybe-couple Jude and Cybil, while Alice is drawn to Tommy, the handsome son of a scandalized physician. The country club is a world full of secrets and Alice and Charlie grow increasingly shocked as they learn more about their stepfather, his family, and even their own mother. Just one year ago, Richard’s wife died from cancer and their sixteen year old golden girl daughter, Camilla, committed suicide soon after. Alice is intrigued by inconsistencies surrounding Camilla and starts investigating, but the truth proves to be highly disturbing. Things get really creepy when Alice finds photos of Camilla and realizes she is a dead ringer for the dead girl. And what about Alice’s clandestine boyfriend Tommy? Turns out he was Camilla’s boyfriend at the time of her death.   

 

The Innocents is the first in a new series which has something for everyone – mystery, romance, and good old-fashioned drama. Readers won’t have long to wait to learn what happens next with these compelling teens as the sequel, This Side of Jealousy, is scheduled for summer 2013.

Maureen

 
 

Unfaithful

Unfaithful

posted by:
November 23, 2012 - 8:05am

The Good WomanAt the center of The Good Woman by Jane Porter is Meg Brennan Roberts, who has always been good. As the oldest of a large Irish-American family, she is the good daughter, always available for support for her siblings, especially now that their mother’s cancer has returned. She is a good wife to Jack, her loving, successful architect husband and a good mother to three wonderful children. She has a good career as a publicist for a small winery in Napa. But lately, Meg has been having thoughts that are anything but good.

 

It all starts on a business trip to London with her younger, handsome boss Chad Hallahan. The international locale and whirlwind of fine food and wine prompt Chad to passionately express his feelings for Meg. She is flattered, and upon returning home cannot get him out of her mind. His declaration coincides with her recent feelings of emptiness, second-guessing her life choices. All of that, combined with the recent emotional distance of her husband, leads Meg right into Chad’s arms.

 

The guilt is overwhelming, but when she is with Chad, she feels like herself again and is blissfully happy.  Unfortunately, that happiness comes at the cost of everyone else in her life and who they need her to be. She chooses her family, but Jack discovers the affair, kicks her out of the house, and turns their children against her. Her family is shocked at their good girl’s behavior and heaps judgment upon her. This is an emotional story that packs a lot of punch. Porter captures the sisterly relationships perfectly and shares the story of infidelity without casting Meg as victim or villain. It is a real life story about tough choices and the aftershocks of mistakes. Readers will rejoice as this is the first of a trilogy, guaranteeing future meetings with the fabulous Brennan sisters.

Maureen

 
 

Let Freedom Ring

Let Freedom Ring

posted by:
November 21, 2012 - 8:30am

We've Got a JobI Have a DreamThe stories of four children who boycotted school to participate in a march to protest segregation are the centerpiece of Cynthia Levinson’s We’ve Got a Job: the 1963 Birmingham Children’s March. Audrey Hendricks, Washington Booker III, Arnetta Streeter, and James Stewart were between the ages of 9 and 15 and from different backgrounds, but were united in their fight for freedom. In the early 1960s, Birmingham was one of the most racially violent cities in America, and the adult residents were not responding to the civil rights movement. Some thought nonviolence was a poor tactic, while others feared for their jobs and their lives. It fell to the children to pick up the cause and “fill the jails” in accordance with the teachings of Mahatma Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King. Some 4,000 young people answered the call and stood strong in the face of police, attack dogs, and water cannons. Levinson’s interviews with the protestors give readers a palpable sense of the fear, pain, and triumph experienced by these young freedom fighters. Quotes, photographs, source notes, and an excellent bibliography all serve to support the narrative thread, and help create a remarkable research source.

 

Martin Luther King’s influence was clearly evident in the Birmingham Children’s March. August 28, 2013 will mark the fiftieth anniversary of King’s inspiring speech at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington. Caldecott-Honor winning artist Kadir Nelson pays tribute to this iconic event in I Have a Dream. This beautiful picture book shares excerpts from the speech accompanied by Nelson’s magnificent full-page oil paintings. Nelson offers powerful images of King and the marchers, but also artistically interprets the speech and shares images which reflect the message. Interested readers will also appreciate the full text of the speech and an accompanying CD of King’s historic delivery. This is an outstanding tribute to an extraordinary moment in time.  

Maureen

 
 

The Little Bird that Could

MoonbirdNewbery Honor and National Book Award winning author Phillip Hoose offers another fascinating story in Moonbird: a Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95. The small shorebird’s name is B95, but scientists have nicknamed him Moonbird, because in his lifetime he has flown the distance to the moon and halfway back – a whopping 325,000 miles. B95 was tagged by researchers in 1995, and they have been chronicling his journeys since then. He is a red knot, a member of the subspecies rufa, and every February he joins a flock that leaves from Tierra del Fuego and heads to breeding grounds in the Canadian Arctic. Late in the summer, the flock begins its return journey. During this round-trip, the birds are able to fly for days without stopping, but rest and food are critical elements to a successful migration. Unfortunately, the available food en route has shrunk due to human activity. The numbers sadly speak to the increased danger involved in this flight, as the worldwide rufa population has dropped drastically from almost 150,000 to less than 25,000 in seventeen years.

 

Hoose is able to personalize the story of B95 with beautiful prose that has the reader cheering on this pint-sized dynamo. He also accessibly interjects facts about the birds and their survival, and introduces some of the men and women who research and help preserve the species. Photographs, maps, and sidebars add to the content. Source notes and an extensive bibliography point to the meticulous research, and information about how readers, including children and teens, can get involved in preservation may spur some to action. Moonbird is not just the powerful portrait of one strong bird, but also an engaging examination of worldwide ecology. And in the amazingly good news front – B95 is still going strong and was spotted at the Jersey shore in May of this year.

Maureen

 
 

Mr. Rich or Mr. Right?

Mr. Rich or Mr. Right?

posted by:
November 5, 2012 - 8:45am

The Jane Austen Marriage ManualKate Shaw is broke, single, and approaching forty, but she is happy with her job as a freelance magazine writer and her circle of supportive friends. Unfortunately, Kate’s happiness is short lived in The Jane Austen Marriage Manual, by Kim Izzo, when she loses her job and her beloved grandmother dies. Still mourning that loss, Kate learns that the home she shared with her grandmother will have to be sold. Kate finds herself camped out in her sister’s living room, sleeping on a couch when she resolves to take a page from the lives of so many women in her favorite Jane Austen novels and find a rich husband. After all, it’s hard to live on love, but diamonds and Dom Perignon make everything a little brighter.

 

Her friends rally round by connecting her to other freelance jobs and presenting her with a unique birthday gift – a Scottish title! This title comes in handy for the newly named Lady Kate of Loch Broom. Her first job is to test the theory that to stay afloat in tough economic times a woman should find herself a wealthy man. Kate begins her research in earnest in London, Palm Beach, and St. Moritz where she rubs shoulders with the rich and richer. She is wooed by one wealthy man, but it is the charming bed and breakfast owner who keeps popping up at events and in her head.

  

Kate’s search for love is an age-old odyssey, but Izzo manages to freshen it up with a memorable cast of supporting characters and some hilariously embarrassing moments. The descriptions of lavish, spectacular parties and couture clothing read like something from The Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous and add pizzazz to Kate’s quest. Ultimately, underneath the fun and frivolity, this is an honest story of one sympathetic woman looking for money, but finding love instead. 

Maureen

 
 

A Little Bit Country

A Little Bit Country

posted by:
October 29, 2012 - 7:45am

City Girl, Country VetLondon veterinarian Maz Harwood is out of work, unlucky in love, and in need of a home when her best friend Emma asks her to fill in at her vet practice in City Girl, Country Vet by Cathy Woodman.  While Maz dreads the doldrums of the country, she wants to help her friend who is taking a six month leave of absence. Maz accepts the offer thinking that a change of scenery is just what the doctor ordered to help heal her recently broken heart.

 

Maz thought the hardest part of the move would be trading in her heels for wellies. She quickly learns that country life is anything but uneventful and the people are definitely not boring. There are the unwelcoming locals who are suspicious of the newcomer. There is the town’s only other vet practice which is determined to destroy any competition. There is the fact that Emma’s practice is in dire financial straits. And of course, there is the handsome son of the rival vet who is most unsuitable, particularly when Maz has sworn off romance.

 

As Maz learns to navigate the perilous politics of country life, she encounters seemingly insurmountable obstacles in her quest to win over the locals, save the lives of her patients, and keep Emma’s practice alive. From rescuing animals from a burning building to dealing with the resentment following her failure to save a beloved pet, Maz has her hands full and is ready to flee back to the comfort of the city. Readers will be transported to a delightful small town and enjoy the slow pace of life in this warm, breezy, romantic comedy with plenty of adorable four-legged friends.

 

Maureen

 
 

Hail to the Chief

Hail to the Chief

posted by:
October 24, 2012 - 7:55am

Presidential PetsThe President's Stuck in the BathtubPresidential politics are in full swing as Election Day approaches and two new books for kids offer a lighter look at the men who have been elected to this highest office. Julia Moberg researched the non-human First Family members in Presidential Pets: The Weird, Wacky, Little, Big, Scary, Strange Animals That Have Lived in the White House. While many had the usual cats and dogs, the White House also became home to goats, mice, bears, zebras, hyenas, and many more. Calvin Coolidge owned a raccoon named Rebecca who dined on shrimp, while Andrew Jackson’s parrot was known to use less than savory language. Each entry opens with a humorous rhyming poem that describes an event with the pet. Sidebars, such as "Presidential Stats" and "Tell Me More", offer basic information and share trivia about the president and his animal. This unique blend of humor, trivia, vibrant graphics, and children’s love of animals brings to life the presidents and the history of each man’s time in office.

  

Susan Katz uses humor in The President’s Stuck in the Bathtub: Poems about the Presidents and focuses on some of the lesser known anecdotes about our presidents. The forty-three poems are diverse in format and include concrete, free verse, and rhyming. Each poem is accompanied by a footnote outlining more specifics, and Robert Neubecker’s digital caricature illustrations are full of interesting details which highlight the stories. While trivial in nature, these funny facts are just right to pique young readers' interests. Further information is provided in the appended list of presidents which includes nicknames, a major accomplishment, and a famous quote. From William Taft’s extrication from a bathtub to John Quincy Adams skinny dipping in the Potomac, all of these stories serve to highlight the human nature of each of our presidents, and makes them more relatable to readers of all ages.

Maureen