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Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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Relationship Status: Single

Relationship Status: Single

posted by:
July 14, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for On the RocksOn the Rocks by Erin Duffy opens with Abby trying on the Vera Wang wedding dress of her dreams. At that moment, her fiancé Ben changes his Facebook relationship status to single and Abby’s life is shattered in this charming novel of friendship, family and love in the crazy age of social media.

 

As Abby struggles to get over Ben, her best friend Grace decides they both need a change of scenery and rents a quaint cottage in Newport for the two to share over the summer. While the pair leaves their problems behind, they enjoy sea breezes, refreshing cocktails and the attentions of handsome men. Abby also secures her very own dating coach when she meets Bobby, an awkward, out-of-work lawyer who demands that she focus on dating as if it were a job. But dating has changed in the 12 years Abby was with Ben, and social media has put a scary spin on the social scene. From Facebook to a walk-of-shame website, Abby navigates her new role as a singleton without the privilege of privacy and the possibility of being cast as a viral victim just a click away.

 

Duffy’s fresh story is a humorous but realistic foray into contemporary dating. Bad dates, laughable pick-up lines, crazy families and clever dialogue are peppered throughout this fun and relatable story that's ultimately the tale of one woman’s unpredictable journey to happiness. Fans of Elin Hilderbrand, Sarah Pekkanen and Nancy Thayer should definitely pack this one on vacation!

Maureen

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Forever Friends

Forever Friends

posted by:
July 2, 2014 - 8:00am

Cover art for China DollsIt’s 1938, and while San Francisco is prepping for a world’s fair and a war is percolating overseas, three young girls are focused on making it as showgirls in the city’s most exclusive Asian revue. Lisa See introduces us to Ruby, Helen and Grace in China Dolls, a captivating novel which takes readers to the dazzling and debauched world of burlesque while detailing the intricate relationships of women and the impact history and fate has on their lives and friendships.

 

Grace Lee, an American-born Chinese girl, has fled the Midwest and an abusive father. Helen Fong lives with her extended and very traditional family in Chinatown. And Ruby Tom is stunning, independent and ambitious, but has a closely guarded secret. These three young women from diverse backgrounds find themselves competing for the same jobs, but still become fast friends sharing secrets, hopes and dreams. Everything changes with the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. As the U.S. government sends innocent Japanese citizens to internment camps, Ruby’s true heritage is exposed and she is sent to a camp in Utah. Did one of her friends betray her secret?

 

Paranoia and suspicion set in, and their friendships become increasingly fragile as the war intensifies. However, bleak times demand support, and the trio always manages to find a way back to one another. Lisa See once again delivers a faultlessly researched historical saga spanning a half century. This story of female friendship, ambition and betrayal is highlighted by the magnificent milieu of Asian burlesque entertainment.  The colorful details create a beautiful backdrop for sharing the life journey of these three remarkable and dynamic women.

Maureen

 
 

Fashionable Friends

Fashionable Friends

posted by:
June 25, 2014 - 7:00am

VintageSusan Gloss's delightful debut Vintage, set in Madison, Wisconsin, weaves a multi-generational story of three women coping with unique personal problems, and finding love and friendship amidst antique clothes and accessories. Violet Turner’s dream to own a vintage boutique was realized with the opening of Hourglass Vintage. But now, she is in danger of losing the boutique and she simply cannot return to her small home town. Eighteen-year-old April is pregnant and has been dumped by her fiancé, bowing to pressure from his snobby parents.  Amithi discovered an unbearable betrayal by her husband of over 25 years and is shedding her clothes and jewels in an effort to remove any memories of a fraudulent life.

 

These women’s lives intersect at Hourglass Vintage, where they bond over a shared love of beautiful things and gradually develop deep and lasting friendships. April interns at the shop to retain her college scholarship. Her head for numbers make her an immediate asset to Violet’s woebegone accounting system. The two work with other clients, including Amithi, who is questioning her past and worried about her future, to raise funds to ensure Violet retains the store. As Violet realizes she can’t save her store alone, she opens her heart to new friends and to the possibility of real romance for the first time since her painful divorce.

 

Gloss opens each chapter with a catalog card perfunctorily detailing an item, its date of manufacture, its condition and previous owner. But the engaging narrative reveals the rich life of each item and also exposes another piece of each woman’s history and character. An online reading guide is available, so be sure to keep this multi-faceted story of transformation, healing and friendship in mind for your summer book club.

Maureen

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Between the Covers with Elin Hilderbrand

Cover art for The MatchmakerWarm days, long nights, the beach and a new novel from Elin Hilderbrand equal summer perfection! This year, the Nantucket resident and bestselling novelist with over four million copies of her books in print returns to her beloved island to bring us The Matchmaker. Dabney has always had a magical gift for matchmaking, which her husband and daughter view as merely meddlesome. But with over 40 happy couples to her credit, none of whom have consciously uncoupled, it’s hard to question her instincts. However, the one person she may have failed is herself. So when Clendenin Hughes returns to the island, she comes face to face with the man who stole her heart so long ago. Readers will relish the romance at the heart of The Matchmaker, an engaging story about losing and finding love.
 

Get to know Elin as she answers questions about her newest blockbuster, the food and books she brings to the beach and reminisces about her time in Baltimore.
 

Between the Covers: Dabney Kimball is the matchmaker in your latest book who has an almost mythical gift for creating perfect pairs. Have you ever successfully matched a couple? Would you ever attempt to interfere in your childrens’ or other family members’ love lives like Dabney does?

Elin Hilderbrand: I have never matched anyone myself, no. I basically take a non-interventionist policy across the board, and always have. I do believe that in matters of love, luck reigns. Some marriages work for no apparent reason and some fail for no apparent reason. Love, in my opinion, is a crapshoot.

 

BTC: Dabney is a woman with secrets at a crossroads. While her matchmaking ability is unique, she is still such a relatable character in the same vein as your previous heroines. How do you create such distinctive, strong female characters? Are they modeled after real people?

EH: Dabney came to me in pieces, and as with my other characters, I started with her flaws. She has a strange phobia about leaving the island...which caused her to lose the only man she ever truly loved...which left her in her current predicament of being married to one man and in love with another. I love all of Dabney's idiosyncrasies, her way of dressing, her habits, her rituals — but none of this matters without her darling, pure, sweet heart. Dabney is older than me, but I love her like she's my child.

 

BTC: You bring Nantucket to life so vividly in The Matchmaker and in almost all of your other novels. What is it about the island that captured your heart?Image of Elin Hilderbrand

EH: When my ferry first pulled into Nantucket harbor, I knew I was a goner. I like to paraphrase John Denver and say it was like coming home to a place I'd never been before. The historically preserved downtown and the 50 miles of pristine beach combine in a way that makes me ache. I love authenticity — and there is no other place in the world that is like Nantucket Island.

 

BTC: Before settling in Nantucket, you spent time here in Baltimore where you graduated from Johns Hopkins University. Did you enjoy your time in Charm City? What do you miss most?

EH: I have wonderful memories of Baltimore, most of them Hopkins-centered. My roommates and I used to hang out at PJ's Pub across the street from the library. Fifty cent pizza slices on Sundays! I adored the Baltimore Museum of Art, which was on campus, and Fells Point, especially Bertha's Mussels. One of my favorite memories was moving our couch out onto our front yard during Opening Day, back when the Orioles played at Memorial Stadium on 33rd Street — our house was at 33rd and Calvert so everyone walked by us, including Richard Gephart. I think what I miss most is the lacrosse. As a 1991 graduate of Hopkins, I saw the best lacrosse anyone can hope to see — it was the era of Dave Pietramala and Quint Kessinich verses the Gait brothers — Paul and Gary — from Syracuse.

 

BTC: You’re a long-suffering Philadelphia Eagles fan. Do you think this is going to be their Super Bowl year? Do you have a favorite baseball team? How do your family and friends feel about your non-New England football fandom?
EH: I am a die-hard Philadelphia Eagles fan from childhood, but I don't think they will ever win a Super Bowl. In the tradition of Philly fandom, I have been disappointed too many times to hold out any hope. In baseball, I root for the Red Sox — that is a tremendous ball club, and Fenway Park is phenomenal. My kids root for the Sox and the Pats, although they also cheer on the Eagles, but probably only because they feel sorry for me.

 

BTC: Share some of your process. Do you write every day? Where? Who do you use as a sounding board?
EH: I write every day that I'm able — which, as my career soars, gets harder and harder. I also have three children who need to be driven around the island to their various sporting events. But I normally take three to four days a week to dedicate to my composing, and in this way, I have managed to finish a book a year. The only people who read my work are my two agents and my editor, Reagan Arthur. Reagan and I have a relationship based in extreme respect. She tells me what to do to fix a book, and I do it.

Cover art for Winter Street

 

BTC: You’ve said you write at the beach in the summer, do you also take time to read while surf-side? What books will be in your beach bag this summer? More importantly, what are the must-haves in your picnic basket?
EH: I am constantly reading. For me, reading is working, because immersing myself in other stories inspires me. Right now, I'm reading Shotgun Lovesongs by Nickolas Butler, which I love. Also on my list are Thirty Girls by Susan Minot and The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street by Susan Jane Gilman.
 

Now, in my picnic basket: my own grilled zucchini dip and chips, lobster salad, corn salad, watermelon and Bing cherries. I'm also a big fan of chilled soups. I make a yellow tomato gazpacho that has fresh orange juice and a little bit of cream in it. It's a drug.

 

BTC: Readers will be delighted to learn that the wait for your next novel is short, as this fall you share the snowy side of Nantucket with Winter Street. Can you give readers a sneak peek of what to expect from this holiday story?
EH: I've never read a Christmas novel myself, but I can say the most fun I've ever had writing a novel was the two and a half months I spent writing Winter Street. It's about a family named the Quinns who run a bed and breakfast on Nantucket, and two days before Christmas, their lives sort of communally fall apart. In addition to family drama, there are nutcrackers, Byers Choice carolers, homemade ornaments, carols banged out on the piano, shots of whiskey, private jets, engagement rings, plum pudding, fires in the hearth, Santa Claus suits and champagne and caviar. If you're an Elin Hilderbrand fan, Winter Street comes highly recommended.

Maureen

 
 

Father Knows Best

Father Knows Best

posted by:
June 13, 2014 - 7:00am

Confessions of the World's Best FatherGood Talk, DadDon’t forget dear old dad’s special day is this Sunday. In the spirit of the day, enjoy this list of some of the most fabulous father figures in literature. If you have a favorite we missed, share in the comments.

 

Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Atticus Finch is the gold standard of fathers. He is handsome, honest, a sharpshooter and just the world’s greatest dad. Harper Lee’s iconic character was given life by Gregory Peck in the film adaptation which prompted the American Film Institute to call Atticus the “greatest movie hero of the 20th century.”

 

Horton in Horton Hatches the Egg by Dr. Seuss. Horton the elephant is tricked into sitting on a bird's egg while its mother, Mayzie, takes a permanent vacation. Horton overcomes a variety of challenges, but remains committed to his task, stating, “I meant what I said, and I said what I meant. An elephant's faithful, one hundred per cent!"

 

William in Danny, The Champion of the World by Roald Dahl. Danny has the best life. He lives in a gypsy caravan, he works on cars and his best friend is his storyteller father, William. When the two embark on an adventure of a lifetime, their relationship deepens. This story of father-son love highlights a dad who Danny calls, "the most marvelous and exciting father a boy ever had."

 

The Man/The Father in The Road by Cormac McCarthy. An unnamed father and his young son journey across a grim post-apocalyptic landscape. As the duo search for safety, the father realizes he is dying, yet still struggles to protect his son from the constant threats of attack, exposure and starvation.

 

Will Freeman in About a Boy by Nick Hornby. Will Freeman is a 36-year-old bachelor focused on wine, women and song. Marcus Brewer is an introverted middle school boy whose mother is suicidal. While their initial friendship is based on deceit, they come to respect and genuinely like each other, and a real relationship is formed.

 

Harry Silver in Man and Boy by Tony Parsons. Harry’s one-night stand starts a chain reaction of events immediately prior to his 30th birthday. His wife leaves him, he loses his job and he is suddenly a single parent to a 4-year-old. As Harry navigates the daily details of parenting, he focuses on the important relationships in his life – his son and his father.

 

Be sure to check out two new nonfiction titles which tackle the tricky world of fatherhood with humor and honesty. Good Talk, Dad by Bill and Willie Geist is a hilarious tribute to the special bond between fathers and sons, and Dave Engledow offers a hysterical photo-centric parody of one clueless dad and his adorable daughter in Confessions of the World’s Best Father.

 

Maureen

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Between the Covers with Steve Berry

Cover art for The Lincoln MythSteve Berry, bestselling and highly acclaimed author of historical thrillers, including the Cotton Malone series, has over 17,000,000 copies of his books in print internationally. Get to know Steve as he answers questions about his latest bestseller and future writing plans, and even shares the strangest way he’s encountered his readers!

 

The Lincoln Myth involves Abraham Lincoln, the U.S. Constitution, religious zealots and of course, Cotton Malone trying to save the country. Where do you get your ideas? Is it true that there is a little bit of you in Cotton?

 

The constitutional concept of secession has always fascinated me.  It's one of those arguments that have no easy answer.  The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is likewise interesting.  It is the quintessential American religion, and it played some key roles in our history.  When I found out that Abraham Lincoln was the first president to ever read the Book of Mormon, and that he made a secret deal with Brigham Young, I knew there was a novel there.  So I sent Cotton Malone to get to the bottom of things.  And he is basically me.  When I created him for The Templar Legacy, I used my personality, so we share a lot of traits, like the love of rare books.  He doesn’t like enclosed spaces, I don’t either.  He doesn’t like the taste of alcohol.  He has finicky eating habits.  That's me.  I, of course, don’t jump out of planes and shoot guns at bad guys, but I live that through him.  

 

You’ve said in the past that the most wonderful fiction always has a ring of truth to it. What’s the ring of truth in The Lincoln Myth?

 

The concept of a union of 50 states that is indivisible and forever is not necessarily accurate.  Lincoln did not fight the Civil War to save the Union, he fought that war to create the Union.  I doubt many of us realize that.  I didn't, until I did the research for this novel.

 

History is so important to you that you and your wife created History Matters to assist communities around the world with historic restoration and preservation.  In fact, you’ll be in Baltimore at the B & O Museum for a reception and book signing on May 21 for the Edgar Allan Poe House. Why does history matter?

 

History is who we are and where we came from.  To forget that or, even worse, to just allow it to rot away, robs the future of that past.  It's our duty to preserve what came before for the next generation.

 

With so many copies of your books all over the world, you must encounter people reading your novels all the time. What is the weirdest place you’ve ever seen a Steve Berry book being read? How about the most exotic?

 

Fiji is probably the most exotic.  The oddest happened in an airport.  The man sitting beside me started reading the latest hardback, then a woman sitting across from me did the same thing.  On the back cover of each book was a full color photo of me, yet neither made the connection.  That's the cool thing about being a writer.  You don't lose your anonymity, which is wonderful.

 

Your favorite holiday decoration is your Star Trek themed tree complete with Santa in a transporter. Have you ever considered writing science fiction or fantasy?

 

I'd love to write a sci-fi novel one day.  I even have one churning in my mind, and I just might do it.  I've always been a fan of that genre.

 

How big of a thrill was it to be asked to write the forewords for the upcoming re-releases of James Michener’s novels?

 

That was truly an honor.  He is, hands-down, my favorite writer of all time.  I have a complete collection of his novels that I've amassed for over 40 years.  To see my name on the same cover with his will be amazing.  I hope a new generation of readers will rediscover Michener.   He was genius.  I write today because of him.

 

Do you have any sneak peeks for our readers as to what’s in store for Cotton Malone’s 15th adventure? Can you share any news in the development of the series for the small screen?

 

Cotton will return in 2015.  This one deals with another fascinating quirk from the Constitution.   It's called The Patriot Threat, and it will be on sale in March.  Alcon Entertainment is still developing a possible television series for Cotton.  Hopefully, it'll make it to the screen one day.  If anyone would like to know more about that, or me, or the books, check out www.steveberry.org.

Maureen

 
 

Contemporary Comfort

Contemporary Comfort

posted by:
May 9, 2014 - 7:00am

Carla's Comfort Foods by Carla HallBack Home with the Neely's by Pat and Gina NeelyTwo new cookbooks by three noted celebrity chefs offer modern twists on favorite comfort food which are sure to appeal to the most skittish of home cooks. Both volumes are beautifully photographed with functional layouts and come complete with tips and instructions.

 

Hootie Hoo! The Chew co-host and Top Chef fan-favorite, Carla Hall, offers an international spin in Carla’s Comfort Foods: Favorite Dishes from Around the World. This sumptuous feast will tantalize the senses as readers travel the culinary globe in search of delectable delights. Featuring over 100 recipes, Carla selects a cooking technique or main ingredient and follows with international variations. For example, partnered with Italian-American lasagna are Irish shepherd’s pie and Mexican enchiladas. The mouthwatering variations are all readily accomplished at home, and Carla’s easy, conversational style is encouraging. The international spice chart is an education in seasoning, and is at the root of Carla’s philosophy that food is food around the world – it’s the spices that make all the difference.

 

For married couple Pat and Gina Neely, restaurateurs and hosts of the hit Food Network series Down Home with the Neelys, food is at the center of a happy home. In their latest cookbook, Back Home with the Neelys: Comfort Food from our Southern Kitchen to Yours, this dynamic duo revisits 100 family recipes passed down through generations and creates new dishes using the past as inspiration. Think Bourbon French Toast, Crunchy Fried Okra and Mama Rena's Brunswick Stew. Mmmmm! The Neelys share family anecdotes along with the recipes which will lead readers on their own journey down memory lane. While rooted in tradition, the Neelys also capture the spirit and flavors of modern and fresh Southern cooking.

Maureen

 
 

The Winter Bride

The Winter Bride

posted by:
April 29, 2014 - 8:00am

The Winter BrideDamaris Chance feels no compulsion to marry but instead longs for a cottage by the sea. Freddy Monkton-Coombes is enjoying the rewards of his rakish ways, which will be severely curtailed if his mother has anything to say about it. In The Winter Bride, Annie Gracie revisits the Chance sisters and shares the stories of this magnetic and damaged duo.

 

Damaris Chance’s unhappy past involves a blackguard sea captain who hurt her so deeply that marriage is no longer an appealing option. But her guardian, Lady Beatrice, convinces her to make her debut and enjoy a season of lighthearted fun. Meanwhile, Freddy’s season is filled with all the single ladies tracking his every move and a mother who won’t stop nagging about marriage. He is also determined to honor his promise to his friend Max to watch out for the Chance sisters. When Freddy discovers Damaris roaming through unsavory parts of town at all hours of the night, he demands to know her secret.

 

Damaris has been surreptitiously selling her painted pottery in an effort to secure her dream cottage. While not a scandalous secret, during the course of their conversation, the two reach a most unorthodox decision and agree to an arranged marriage. Freddy can continue his womanizing ways, and Damaris will have her cottage. As the two spend more time together during their “engagement,” they share confidences and dreams. Is marriage really such a bad thing after all? Gracie continues her Chance Sisters series with another charming romance centered by a charismatic couple while positioning the players to be featured in the next two seasons. Spring and summer can’t come soon enough! 

Maureen

 
 

Throwback Thursday

Throwback Thursday

posted by:
April 24, 2014 - 8:00am

The Satanic VersesAll I Really Need to Know I Learned in KindergartenTake a ride 25 years into the past to April 1989, when side ponytails, shoulder pads and acid-washed jeans were ubiquitous amidst a wash of ever-present neon. The “Why Not?” Orioles were rebounding from a terrible year and headed toward second place in the American League East, and Billy Ripken’s obscenity-laced baseball card was the talk of the nation. In theaters, moviegoers were being entertained by Field of Dreams and Pet Sematary. On the small screen, viewers were enjoying debut seasons of Roseanne, Murphy Brown and China Beach and getting ready to say goodbye to favorites such as Dynasty, Family Ties and the long-running American Bandstand. Wonder what was going on in books? Well, readers in 1989 had good taste! The top titles on both the fiction and nonfiction New York Times best seller lists have withstood the passage of time and remain perennial favorites.

 

The top fiction title was The Satanic Verses by Salman Rushdie.  First published in the United Kingdom to positive reviews, this title was a Booker Prize Finalist and won the 1988 Whitbread Award for novel of the year. Major controversy surrounded the book, with some conservative Muslims calling it blasphemous and a fatwa calling for Rushdie’s death issued by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, then Supreme Leader of Iran. Rounding out the list were Star by Danielle Steel, a tale of star-crossed love, and two titles that are now staples on high school reading lists: A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving and The Joy Luck Club by Amy Tan.

 

And who could forget the fervor surrounding the top nonfiction title? All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten by Robert Fulghum contained inspirational essays about everyday matters and struck a chord with readers and gift givers everywhere. Today, there are more than 7 million copies in print in over 90 countries. Also on the nonfiction list were two regularly read titles that have become contemporary classics – A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, which has sold more than 10 million copies to date, and Blind Faith by Joe McGinnis. 

Maureen

 
 

And the Finalists Are…

And the Finalists Are…

posted by:
April 15, 2014 - 7:00am

The Devil's Heart by Cathy MaxwellThe Countess Conspiracy by Courtney MilanCrazy Thing Called Love by Molly O'KeefeRomance writers across the country were recently thrilled to receive that special phone call sharing the news that their books were finalists for a RITA Award. RITAs are the highest honor of distinction in romance fiction, and are awarded in 12 categories. The categories cover the wide range of romance readership, including erotica, paranormal and historical.

 

The Romance Writers of America (RWA) bestows these awards to highlight excellence in published romance novels and novellas at its annual conference in San Antonio, Texas, in July. Want to see how many you’ve read? Check out the complete list, which also includes Golden Heart (excellence in unpublished romance manuscripts) nominees. Have you read any of the RITA Award nominees? Let us know what you thought in the comments. Congratulations to all the finalists!

Maureen