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Maureen

Maureen enjoys books from every corner of the library, including the children's room. She will share her favorite fun adult books and also give you titles to bring home for the kids! When not working in the Collection Development department, Maureen can be found rooting for the Ravens or relaxing at the Jersey shore.

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Maureen

Between the Covers with Jill Kargman

posted by: September 20, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sprinkle Glitter on My GraveJill Kargman, creator and star of Bravo’s Odd Mom Out, has been called the Edith Wharton of contemporary Manhattan, specifically the Upper East Side. She’s a best-selling novelist with a sharp wit that is evident in her newest book of humorous essays, Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave: Observations, Rants and Other Uplifting Thoughts About Life. From bothersome behaviors to musings that keep her awake at night, Kargman puts it all on the table in her own unique, uproarious delivery. Get to know Jill as she answers questions about her latest book, the demands of television and life on the Upper East Side.

 

Between the Covers: Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave is absolutely hilarious and one of my favorite books of the year. How difficult is it to get your snarky voice on the page?

 

Jill Kargman: I basically just write like I talk! My dad told me to do that ages ago so it's really like breathing to me.

 

BTC: This book, complete with your doodles, seems almost like a diary or journal. How did it come about?

 

JK: I actually had a template from my last nonfiction book, Sometimes I Feel Like a Nut so I essentially redid that format but with new anecdotes, lists and rants.

 

BTC: The title is perfect and I believe your daughter is responsible for it. How else did your family influence this book?

 

JK: Yes! Ivy came up with it ’cause she thought flowers, which die quickly, are depressing in graveyards so she is going to sprinkle glitter on my grave because it's hard to clean up. My brother, mom, dad, husband and other two kids Sadie and Fletch plus my former sister-in-law forever friend Drew. Everyone in my life is part of my humor and my five bridesmaids 15 years ago are still my sisters.

 

BTC: I think the reason I love Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave is the many common irks we share, including the thunderous applause for certain dead celebrities at awards ceremony’s death roll calls which makes my blood boil! Sharing what’s in your head helps some of your readers know we aren’t alone, but how do the people/groups you are making fun of, especially the Upper East Siders, react to you and your writing?

 

JK: They weirdly don't care and always think it's other people — which it is, since no one thinks she's a bad mom or spends too much or hears herself when she does a humble brag. ("Ugh the traffic to Teterboro was a nightmare!")

 

BTC: Describe your writing process. Do you write every day? Do you have a go-to snack or beverage while writing?

 

JK: I have a huge iced coffee and work out and shower, then get an omelet, then work. I usually have two main meals a day so I'll work ’til my kids get home so like four hours — I can't be funny after that!

 

BTC: You finished college (Yale no less!) in three years, started your first job as a writer at age 20 at Interview magazine and had your first novel published at 27. To achieve such success at such a young age must have been a heady experience. How did your career and life experiences during your 20s shape your writing today?

 

JK: I was miz at Interview — the worst two years — I was basically a secretary BUT I got to write a ton of little articles and some features so it was all worth it but at the time I had NO idea how it would pay off. But each job was such a stepping stone including being berated by [jerks] because it built a crocodile skin and [lots] of appreciation for the people I love and observational skills.

 

BTC: Your hit Bravo show, Odd Mom Out, is now in its second season and it’s even better than the first. What is it like being the creator, producer and star of a hit television show and how has it impacted your life as a writer, wife and mom?

 

JK: I LOVE IT! It's been the most fun I've ever had. When my kids were little (I had three kids in five years) I thought I was losing my mind and needed to be alone and write my books which was like therapy. But now they're older so writing Sprinkle Glitter on My Grave was actually isolating so I was so psyched to get back into the writers room for Odd Mom Out where we laugh all day as a group.

 

BTC: Favorite episode?

 

JK: The ODD Couple, episode 205.

 

BTC: Our readers love reading! Can you share what you are reading now?

 

JK: The September issue of Vogue.

 

BTC: Favorite book of the year?

 

JK: A Little Life by Hanya Yanagihara.

 

BTC: Favorite book as a child?

 

JK: Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing by Judy Blume.

 

BTC: Any memories of hijinks in libraries?

 

JK: Uh....you don't want to know. Rated X. The stacks at Yale are legendary. ;)

 

BTC: You have so much on your plate, but what can we expect next?

 

JK: I'm doing a show at The Carlyle in January of 2017 called “Stairway to Cabaret,” which is heavy metal covers at the piano with standup. Come up to NYC and say hi!!!

 

Thanks for doing this! I love Baltimore! XOJK


 
 

Underground Airlines

posted by: September 7, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Underground AirlinesIn Ben Winters’ Underground Airlines, our world is exactly as we know it. Social media is humming, fast food chains are thriving and UPS is delivering. Except there was one event that changed the course of our history — Abraham Lincoln was assassinated on his way to his inauguration. The Civil War never happened. And slavery is still the practice in four states.

 

The United States is part-slave, part-free, with the "Hard Four" states adhering to the old ways. Winters explores all the questions raised by this intriguing alternative history. Who benefits from the slave trade? Where do new slaves come from? The answers are told through the story of a young black man named Victor. Victor chose freedom in exchange for agreeing to work as a bounty hunter for the U.S. Marshall’s Service, the agency responsible for capturing and returning runaway slaves. While he suppresses memories of a childhood on the plantation, he works to infiltrate an abolitionist cell known as the Underground Airlines. His latest case finds him in Indianapolis, on the trail of a runaway named Jackdaw. But this case is different as he finds himself dealing with an uncommunicative boss as well as a young woman and her child who Victor cannot ignore. As his pursuit intensifies, Victor discovers secrets behind our government’s arrangement with the Hard Four — secrets that are not meant to be exposed. Victor struggles with retaining his freedom versus revealing the corrupt truth.

 

This blend of dystopian fiction, police procedural and alternative history results in a thrilling, quickly paced read. The premise is explosive, the story is well-constructed and the conclusion is exhilarating. Winters handles a provocative topic with sensitivity, but isn’t afraid to challenge the reader by raising thought-provoking issues throughout the novel. This one will stay with you long after the last page, as The Washington Post noted, “Winters has written a book that will make you see the world in a new light.”


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Tailored for Trouble

posted by: August 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Tailored for TroubleI’ll be honest, I had never read Mimi Jean Pamfiloff’s books before, but the cover of Tailored for Trouble sold me at first glance! And the book, the first in the Happy Pants series, exceeded expectations. Sassy, sexy and funny, this romantic comedy serves up two strong-willed and dynamic characters, quirky and memorable secondary characters, a magical sugar cookie and a mother’s dying wish.

 

Taylor Reed was fed up with dealing with selfish, boorish CEOs in her role at a corporate recruiting company. She reached her limit with pompous, arrogant Bennett Wade and walked out on her job — after giving him a strongly worded piece of her mind. Two months later, she is struggling to get her own company, an executive training course focusing on compassion, off the ground. When Bennett Wade forces his way back into her life, she agrees to coach him, even though his handsome face and brusque demeanor are a constant annoyance.

 

As Bennett and Taylor travel the world on business, she begins to see a side of Bennett she never imagined, and slowly realizes that he is damaged and is trying to make amends for something in his past.  As his soft side is slowly revealed, the intensity between the two grows. Pamfiloff combines skilled writing and brisk pacing to escalate the tension between Bennett and Taylor, and the reader will be rewarded with an enchanting happily-ever-after. While waiting for further installments in this charming series, readers should check out Christina Lauren, J. Kenner or Alice Clayton — all guaranteed to provide the same spicy fun!


 
 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

posted by: July 31, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Harry Potter and the Cursed ChildIt’s finally here! Harry Potter and the Cursed Child arrives today, and fans who have waited to learn more about their favorites will devour this script of the play based on an original new story by J. K. Rowling, Jack Thorne and John Tiffany. The Cursed Child is set 19 years after the seventh and final book in the series, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and Harry Potter is now (gulp!) 37 with his own family. Harry Potter first entered our lives 19 years ago with Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and since 1997, all titles in the series have sold more than 450 million copies and been adapted into eight films.

 

Harry is an overworked employee of the Ministry of Magic, a husband and father of three school-age children. Harry and wife Ginny, accompanied by old friends Ron and Hermione, watch as their children set off from King’s Cross for a new term at Hogwarts. While Harry struggles with his past, his youngest son Albus must deal with the burden of being the child of a legend. He is unpopular and living under the shadow of his famous father, but Albus feels he has one true friend — Scorpius Malfoy, the son of his father’s arch enemy, Draco. But is Albus, as Harry suspects, being taken advantage of? And what about the persistently circulating rumor that Scorpius is really the child of the dark wizard, Lord Voldemort?

 

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is one play presented in two parts. The production has won five-star reviews from critics, with one describing it as "a game-changing production.” The play opened last night at the Palace Theatre in London’s West End, and Daily Telegraph critic Dominic Cavendish raved, "British theatre hasn't known anything like it for decades and I haven't seen anything directly comparable in all my reviewing days."

 


 
 

Summer Book Buzz

posted by: June 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for GruntCover art for HomecomingLooking for the next buzzworthy title or the perfect beach read? BCPL librarians are sharing and discussing the must-have books for summer at Book Buzz sessions at various library branches. Join us and you’ll have an instant summer reading list!

 

We’re talking about so many great summer reads, but here’s a quick look at our favorites. Nonfiction readers should not miss Mary Roach’s newest, Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War, in which she applies her childlike sense of wonder and curiosity to war by asking all the questions that pop into her head when visiting military research facilities from Natick Soldier Systems Center to the nearby Aberdeen Proving Ground.

 

Fiction readers will devour these favorites which include Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing, a debut novel which Ta-Nehisi Coates called an “inspiration.” Told in 14 chapters spanning 250 years, each chapter tells the story of a descendant of two sisters from Ghana. Another debut getting considerable attention is Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley, a charming study of loneliness, the limits of one’s sanity and the powerful bond between a man and his dog.

 

In the mood for a thriller? Be sure to check out City of the Lost by Kelley Armstrong set in Rockton, a secret town in the far north of Canada where the hunted go to hide. Casey and her best friend each have reasons to disappear, but upon arriving in Rockton they realize they may be in even more danger. Wendy Walker’s All Is Not Forgotten follows teen Jenny Kramer’s brutal rape and the repercussions when her parents opt to try a new drug offered by doctors that will eradicate the memory of the rape.

 

My favorite is Leigh Himes’ The One That Got Away, which centers on Abbey Lahey, an overworked mom whose life is in a rut when she spies a former suitor, Alexander van Holt, in the pages of Town & Country. She immediately wonders “what if” and can’t stop thinking about how her life would have been different. When she wakes in the hospital from an accidental fall, she is Mrs. Alexander van Holt with money, privilege and status. But is it all she dreamed it would be? Be sure to join us to hear about more hot titles at a Book Buzz near you.


 
 

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