Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Sign up now. Read from June 16 to August 10. Fizz, Boom, READ! Summer Reading Club.
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on TwitterBCPL on FlickrBCPL on Tumblr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Lori Hench

As a child, Lori Hench fell in love with Beverly Cleary's books and has had her nose in a book ever since. Now an adult, she finds saying "but I have to read this for work" is a wonderful excuse for avoiding housework and other distasteful chores. When she's not reading, she works at the Randallstown Branch and enjoys recommending literary fiction, memoirs, and current nonfiction. She admits to still liking children's books and, in a pinch, will read absolutely anything.

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

   Author Interviews

   Awards

   In the News

Librarians

For the Love of Google

For the Love of Google

posted by:
February 21, 2013 - 8:01am

Mr. Panumbra's 24-Hour BookstoreA riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma:  Mr. Churchill’s quote applies neatly to author Robin Sloan’s debut novel, the charming Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. Originally published as a short story in 2009, Sloan says “it gathered a following and ultimately grew” into his first book. Imagine a story about an ancient and secret society, one which involves puzzles, complicated codes, handmade typeface, and the quest for immortality. Now imagine a thriller which involves computer-hacking geeks, advanced cyber-technology, trademarked font, and big business. Finally, try to imagine a book combining these disparate elements and the fascinating result will be Mr. Penumbra.

 

Clay Jannon is a twenty-something laid-off web designer living in San Francisco. Financially desperate circumstances and newspaper help-wanted ads land him a job as the night clerk in Ajax Penumbra’s store. While Clay is able to satisfy the job requirement of scaling a ladder three stories high to retrieve books from the skyscraper-like shelves, he quickly develops a problem following another workplace rule: he is never to look inside the books. Before long, Clay cracks open a forbidden spine and falls into a world of codex vitae, Festina Lente, and a members-only chained library, all  while hanging out with the Googlers at their compound-like workplace campus, harnessing the on-line research superpower of Hadoop, and tapping into a digital database of museum inventories worldwide.

 

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore is both engaging and clever. Sloan splices together old-fashioned intrigue and modern computerized marvels using a mix of real and imagined constructs. Ultimately though, the true Holy Grails and miracles which Sloan is offering in this story may turn out to be the power of friendship and the amazing technological wonders of our times.

Lori

categories:

 
 

Blood or Water?

Blood or Water?

posted by:
February 11, 2013 - 8:45am

yBooks about children in the foster care system tend to be a largely grim bunch. Fiction or fact, they are often filled with requisite accounts of, at best, benign neglect and frequently tell a far more horrifying tale. In her debut novel, Y, author Marjorie Celona explores the concept of family ties that bind both by blood and by choice.

 

The headline reads “Abandoned Infant: Police Promise No Charges” after a newborn baby is found in the early morning on the steps of the YMCA. The revolving door of foster families grinds into motion as baby Shandi gets shuffled about, her name changed to Shannon and her arm broken by a foster father. As a preschooler, Shannon lands in the loving home of single mother Miranda and her daughter Lydia-Rose who is the same age as Shannon. Miranda’s home is modest and her income small, yet she is determined to form a family which includes loving Shannon as her daughter, as Lydia-Rose’s sister.

 

Could the story end here? Instead, Celona goes on to explore the effects of abandonment and subsequent feelings of alienation on Shannon as she grows up in Miranda’s home. At the same time, she alternates Shannon’s story with that of her parents and grandparents, revealing the trajectory of events which led up to the morning at the Y. Celona uses Shannon as an omniscient narrator and allows her to completely relate her own story; this includes her search for her “real” parents. At the same time, she is recounting her biological family’s history, chronicling incidents occurring long before her birth. Ultimately, Shannon must figure out what constitutes “family” for her. For more about growing up in the foster care system, try Janet Fitch’s White Oleander or Ashley Rhodes-Courter’s biography, Three Little Words.

 

Lori

categories:

 
 

Culture Clash

Culture Clash

posted by:
January 14, 2013 - 8:50am

Back to BloodTom Wolfe is back. Eighty-one years old, a controversial player on the literary scene since 1965, and still decked out in his hallmark white suit, Wolfe’s newest book proves he is ever a master of pointed social commentary as he skewers Miami and its denizens in his novel, Back to Blood.

 

Miami: it isn’t just for snowbirds anymore. Officer Nestor Camacho is a young and buff policeman out on patrol on the Biscayne Bay when he is pressed into service to bring down a man clinging to the apex of a 70 foot boat mast. Camacho, in a Herculean show of strength, “rescues” the man, according to accolades heaped upon him by the Miami Herald. Or rather, make that the “Yo No Creo El Miami Herald,” (“I don’t believe the Miami Herald”) as it’s known in the large and influential Cuban population. Camacho is now a pariah among his Cuban family and community for taking down a Cuban refugee before he reached dry land, destroying his chance for asylum.

 

Wolfe writes his cast of characters with a politically incorrect and sometimes sordid pen. A WASPy newspaper editor thinks he’s found relevance in his association with the Russian benefactor filling the city’s new art museum, who instead may be foisting forgeries into the collection. A gorgeous but naive Cuban nurse thinks she is movin’ on up by having an affair with her Americano employer, a publicity hungry sex-addiction doctor for whom the phrase “physician, heal thyself” seems to be tailor-made. A Haitian professor is ashamed of his heritage yet earns his living teaching Creole while obsessively hoping his sweet daughter can “pass” for white. Nestor is the hub around which these stories turn, presented in Wolfe’s trademark frenetically vivid style. In the same vein as Wolfe’s earlier take on New York in The Bonfire of the Vanities, fans of social satire should enjoy Back to Blood.

 

Lori

categories:

 
 

Fire on the Mountain

Fire on the Mountain

posted by:
December 31, 2012 - 9:15am

Flight BehaviorA forest aflame is what Dellarobia Turnbow sees as she pauses on her march up the mountain. She is on a mission to destroy her disappointing marriage by consummating a flirtation with the telephone man. In the smokeless silence, the ambivalently Christian Della knows she has been the recipient of a kind of grace and backtracks to return home. Barbara Kingsolver follows Dellarobia and the aftermath of her vision in her most recent entry on the New York Times bestsellers list, Flight Behavior.

 

Della and her husband Cub live with their two young children in the shadow of his domineering parents on the family farm situated in a rural Tennessee valley. Scarcely adequate high school educations and a severe dearth of employment opportunities mean the Turnbows, along with most folks in their community, are scrambling each month to survive. In danger of losing their land, Cub’s parents view Money Tree Logging Company’s bid to clear cut a portion of their property as an answer to their fiscal prayers. Silent about her vision and uncertain as to its import, Della convinces the family to hike the land, where they discover Della’s fire is actually an immense roost of Monarch butterflies.

 

As in earlier books such as Prodigal Summer, Kingsolver intertwines an environmental issue—in this instance, climate change—as in integral piece of the larger story. Along with the King Billies, as the butterflies are colloquially known, come scientists, tourists, and opportunists which include the local media, all with a different interest in the flock. Della and her family struggle to come to terms with the changes brought by the insects both to their community and individually. With a background in biology, Kingsolver marries the scientific tale of migratory butterflies to the human struggle for meaning and self-fulfillment in Flight Behavior.

 

Lori

categories:

 
 

Natty Boh and Pitchers from the Sunpapers

Baltimore BeerDays RememberedBaltimore CountyCare for a stroll down memory lane? How about a local history lesson? Check out this trio of books focusing on Bawlmer and its ‘burbs. Baltimore Beer: A Satisfying History of Charm City Brewing joins Days Remembered: Iconic Photography of the Baltimore Sun and Baltimore County: Historical Reflections and Favorite Scenes in a remembrance of things past.

 

Local author, former Sun food columnist, and founder of Baltimore Beer Week, Rob Kasper knows his food and drink. In Baltimore Beer, he traces the growth of the brewing industry beginning with the influence of the German immigrants who brought their craft with them from Europe. Loaded with anecdotes and moving from early biergartens to modern brewpubs, Kasper explores the breweries’ social and economic influence on the Baltimore area. “Ain’t the beer cold?”

 

Baltimore residents Barton and Elizabeth Cockey teamed up to produce a charming look at ye olde suburbia in their book Baltimore County. Divided into sections such as Transportation, Public Buildings and Schools, and Wars, this book takes the reader on a tour of county peoples and places and offers an informative narrative laced with personal recollections. Instead of photographs, the book is illustrated with artist Elizabeth’s paintings of the area.

 

2012 marked the 175th year anniversary of the Baltimore Sun. While no longer a “penny paper,” the power of its photographs to inform and inspire remains a constant. Days Remembered is a collection of images from the Sun spanning from the 1901 debut portrait photograph of Judge Sherry of the Maryland Court of Appeals to the Blue Angels flight over Fort McHenry this past summer. Grouped by decade and including pictures of Babe Ruth, marble step-scrubbing, Blaze Starr, the Berrigan brothers, and the integration of Southern High, this visual history perfectly captures the past one hundred-plus years of Maryland living.

 

Lori

 
 

The Show Must Go On

The Show Must Go On

posted by:
November 19, 2012 - 9:45am

The Round HouseBewildermentGoblin SecretsBehind the Beautiful Forevers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hurricane Sandy wrought substantial damage to the building housing the offices of the National Book Foundation in New York City. Despite this disruption, the Foundation, which is the presenter of the prestigious National Book Award prizes, held its awards dinner on November 14 and announced the winners in four different categories.

 

Native American Louise Erdrich won the top honor for Fiction with her book, The Round House. Taking place on a North Dakota reservation, The Round House is a sensitive coming of age story and an unflinching look at contemporary tribal life as well as a tangled legalese whodunit. This beautifully written selection was discussed earlier in Between the Covers, as was the winner in the Nonfiction category, Katherine Boo’s Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity. Boo, a journalist, stayed in one of Mumbai’s poorest slum communities for several years and carefully chronicled the stories of the people and families living as the have-nots in a city acknowledged to be the wealthiest in India.

 

National Book awards are also presented for Young People’s Literature, won by William Alexander for his tale, Goblin Secrets, and its Poetry prize was bestowed upon David Ferry for his volume entitled Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations. As indicated by the eponymous title, eighty-eight year old Ferry includes both his original poems as well as his translations of other works which support the themes of his verses. Goblin Secrets is described by Kirkus Reviews as a mix of “steampunk and witchy magic” and features Rownie, a boy searching for his missing older brother in the city of Zombay. Opening with a witch who needs her clockwork chicken legs wound up with a crank so she can walk, Ferry has crafted a unique debut novel.

 

Lori

 
 

Ill-Gotten Gains

Ill-Gotten Gains

posted by:
November 2, 2012 - 7:03am

 

Live by NightPhantomFor best-selling authors like Jo Nesbo and Dennis Lehane, even if the adage “crime doesn’t pay” is true, writing about it most certainly does. Nesbo offers up Phantom, the ninth book in his police detective series, while Lehane continues his Boston-based Coughlin family saga with Live by Night. Joe is the baby boy of the Coughlin brothers, introduced to us in The Given Day. All grown up and despite coming from a line of Boston Irish policemen, Joe chooses the gangster life of the Prohibition-era 1920s. Moving between rival mobs with bloody street wars and after a stint in Boston’s infamous Charlestown prison, Joe ends up with a promotion to expand Maso Pescatore’s “family” businesses in Florida, including hooch distillation and prostitution. Cuban immigration, evangelical tent revivals, the love of women both good and bad, and some rather snappy dialogue (along with a plethora of weaponry) illuminate Joe’s struggle to balance his humanity against his choices. Better known for the psychological thrillers  Mystic River and Shutter Island, Lehane shows his versatility as an author in Live by Night.

 

 Nesbo is the Norwegian author of the Harry Hole (pronounced Hool-eh) books. In Phantom, Hole, having been dismissed from Oslo’s force, is working independently to prove Oleg Rauke, the drug running son of Hole’s former lover, innocent of murder. Nesbo has a “sins of the father” theme running through this book; as he is dying, the victim addresses his dad as part of the ongoing narration while Hole’s motivation stems in part from his guilt at abandoning his paternal role in Oleg’s upbringing. The Harry Hole series is tightly written and often weaves politics and institutional corruption into its intricate plots. Fans of Stieg Larsson and Nelson DeMille won’t want to miss Jo Nesbo and Phantom.

Lori

 
 

Lightning Strikes Twice

The Garden of Evening MistsOne of the literary world’s more prestigious prizes is Great Britain’s Man Booker prize for contemporary fiction. On October 16, Mantel’s novel, Bring Up the Bodies, won this year’s Booker award. Second in a planned trilogy about Thomas Cromwell and the court of Henry VIII, Mantel won the same prize in 2009 for her first book in the series, Wolf Hall. While Mantel is only the third author (and the only woman) ­to win the Booker twice, she is also the only author to win again for a sequel. Between the Covers looked at Bring Up the Bodies in September.

 

One of the short list nominees was Indian poet and musician Jeet Thayil’s debut novel and an homage to the sub-continent’s drug culture, Narcopolis. Thayil, a self-confessed former addict, takes the reader on a fantastical journey through Bombay’s opium dens and brothels. Often revolving around Dimple, a beautiful enigmatic eunuch working as a prostitute and pipe-preparer, the narrative slips in and out of the side stories of other characters while the arrival of heroin begins to exert its influence in this underworld. In interviews, Thayil says he wanted to honor the “poor and marginalized, the voiceless,” whose story rarely is told and he does so in a portrayal that is disturbing and graphic but not gratuitous.

 

 Also on the short list was author Tan Twan Eng for his novel The Garden of Evening Mists. In the earliest stages of dementia, Malaysian judge Yun Ling Teoh is retiring from the bench. Once a prisoner in a Japanese internment camp in the Malayan jungle where her sister died, Ling Teoh then survived the pursuant guerilla civil wars by taking refuge in the Highlands with an exiled Japanese royal gardener and artist. Elegantly written, grim with historical detail, The Garden of Evening Mists tantalizingly reveals the secrets in Ling Teoh’s complex past.

Lori

 
 

And Justice for All

And Justice for All

posted by:
October 22, 2012 - 8:45am

The Round HouseAward-winning author and owner of the Birchbark Books store in Minnesota, Louise Erdrich is of both European and Native American descent. Her Ojibwe heritage is an integral part of her latest novel, The Round House, which revolves around a crime committed against a woman of the Chippewa tribe.

 

Narrated by thirteen-year-old Joe, the story opens with a brutal attack on Joe’s mother Geraldine, a tribal enrollment specialist. Deeply traumatized and unable to cope, Geraldine withdraws to her bedroom, stymieing the police investigation. Joe’s father, a tribal lawyer, is convinced the violence was not random and enlists Joe’s help in reviewing pertinent legal cases which he believes will lead them to the perpetrator. With the help of friends and extended family, Joe uncovers evidence pointing to Linden Lark, a white man with a family history of checkered relations with the Chippewa. Unfortunately, while Geraldine knows the assault took place near the Round House, the reservation’s spiritual center, she cannot pinpoint the exact location and the area includes both tribal lands and state-owned property. With no clear jurisdiction, the case cannot be prosecuted and Lark is freed.

 

Erdrich braids together elements of native culture and mythology, Southern Gothic style, and the commonality of the male adolescent experience, all of which drive Joe’s decisions.  The devastating impact, both past and present, of alcohol on Indian families is unmistakable. Relations between the tribal members and the white community are repeatedly shown as tenuous, the truce uneasy. 

 

The Round House is a multi-faceted jewel.  It is a coming-of-age story, a view of contemporary Native American reservation life, and a thriller turning on legal niceties while relentlessly moving to an inevitable conclusion. Erdrich’s afterword includes information about organizations working to correct the difficulties of prosecuting reservation crimes, especially sexual assault against Native women. 

 

Lori

 
 

Imagine All the People

Imagine All the People

posted by:
October 15, 2012 - 8:45am

Memoirs of an Imaginary FriendBudo and Max are best friends. Budo is five with many friends, but he is second-grader Max’s only friend. Max is “on the spectrum,” living someplace undefined in the lands of autism and Asperger’s syndrome. Budo, too, has his challenges, not the least of which is that he is imaginary. In Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks, Budo not only draws us into Max’s world but into his own rich life as well.

 

For Max, elementary school is fraught with peril; between bullies in the bathroom, playtime politics at recess, and mainstreaming in the classroom, he views his time with the resource center aide Mrs. Patterson as a respite from the confusing challenges that other people present. Budo spends his time guiding Max through his day but when Max is sleeping or intently playing with his Legos and soldiers, Budo is free to explore. Making trips to a convenience store, hanging out in the school office, and mentoring other pretend friends—he is ancient in terms of imaginaries’ longevity—Budo is an engaging mix of child and sage. One afternoon, Max disappears from school. When the teachers, police, and Max’s parents are unable to find him, Budo springs into action to find his friend. When Budo uncovers what he calls “the actual devil in the actual pale moonlight,” he is forced to decide between his love and sense of responsibility for Max or his own very existence.

 

Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend has been compared to bestsellers Room and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime for its uncanny representation of little boys’ thought processes and understanding of the adult world, as well as its accurate depiction of a child on the autism spectrum. Dicks writes this surprising story with tenderness, compassion, and humor.

 

Lori

categories: