Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Leanne Farrell

Leanne's first memory is walking down a tree-lined street to the public library, and she hasn't been without a book since. Leanne enjoys narrative non-fiction and biographies, literary fiction and children and teen fiction, but her favorites are mysteries and thrillers. A native Marylander, when her nose isn't in a book, you'll find her rooting for the Orioles and the Ravens.

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Leanne

I Let You Go

posted by: June 27, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for I Let You GoA split-second decision; a hand raised to brush away an annoyance, a little boy deciding to race his mother home, and tragedy strikes in I Let You Go by Claire Mackintosh. A terrible accident that takes the life of a child is compounded by the driver’s escape from the scene. After months of grinding investigation, false leads and frustrating witness statements, the driver is never found. Despite instructions from his superiors, Inspector Ray Stevens refuses to relegate the investigation to the cold case files. Compulsively committed, Stevens continues a covert inquiry.

 

Consumed by grief and regret, Jenna abandons her successful career as an artist and the life she knows and seeks seclusion in a seaside town in Wales. The harshly scenic surroundings inspire her to fresh artistic expression. Gradually, the nightmares wane and Jenna begins to heal. Just as she hesitantly reaches out and makes friends, her past life reappears with unpredictable and horrifying consequences.

 

Mackintosh leads the reader down these parallel paths until they converge with unexpectedly shocking results. Beautifully written, this deeply emotional subject matter is handled with skill and grace. Elegantly plotted, deeply imagined characters and unpredictable revelations combine to create an enthralling story. With the twists of The Girl on the Train and the emotional resonance of The Husband’s Secret, this compulsive read will haunt you long after you close the cover.


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Miss Julia Inherits a Mess

posted by: May 24, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Miss Julia Inherits a MessEver the faithful friend and family fixer, Miss Julia is plunged into a disaster not of her own making in Miss Julia Inherits a Mess by Ann B. Ross. Julia is dismayed to learn that Mattie Freemantle, a spinster with no family, has fallen and broken her hip. As any good neighbors would, Julia and her friends gather to visit, comfort and organize. Mattie can hardly be called a close friend, but it’s the right thing to do. So you can just imagine Julia’s reaction when she receives a call from Mattie’s lawyer informing her she entrusted Julia with power of attorney, and that decisions must be made promptly. When Mattie dies, Julia learns to her horror that she is the executor of the will.

 

Mattie’s home is loaded with furniture, bric-a-brac and junk mail that will take weeks to sort. Mattie has remembered half the town in her will, from the mechanic who repaired her ancient car to the grocery boy who carried her parcels. Mattie’s promises went a lot farther than her wealth; that $840 in her bank account isn’t going to go far.

 

Realizing that the task will only fall to less capable shoulders, Julia pitches in and gets to work. Employing some local experts to assist with valuation, a possible nugget is discovered under all that dust. Things are looking up, until a young man claiming to be Mattie’s long lost nephew asks to live in her apartment and take some of her things — for sentimental value, of course.

 

Fans of lighthearted southern fiction will delight in the town’s eccentric characters and Miss Julia’s efforts to fulfill a lonely old spinster's final wishes. Fans of Fanny Flagg, Mignon Ballard and Jan Karon will find a treat in this satisfying romp.

 


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Journey to Munich

posted by: May 23, 2016 - 7:00am

Journey to MunichIn early 1938, the intrepid Maisie Dobbs returns to England and her former profession in Journey to Munich by Jacqueline Winspear. As Maisie walks the streets of London, she meanders through her memories. Dealing with her grief and the irresponsible actions that lead to her husband’s death, Maisie is approached by MI-5 for a treacherous mission. Leon Donat, a British subject visiting Germany to publish books, has been taken prisoner and sent to the notorious prison at Dachau. After complex negotiations, the German government has agreed to release Donat, but only if his daughter personally escorts her father home. Bearing a striking resemblance to Donat’s gravely ill daughter, as well as possessing certain valuable skills, MI-5 considers Maisie to be Donat’s only chance at escape.

 

Donat is no ordinary book publisher. He loves to tinker, and with his pen and paper he creates amazing inventions. Donat’s engineering skills and creative energy could mean the difference between winning and losing a war. While war has not yet been declared, it is obvious that the great nations of Europe are marching down an inexorable path. Germany has become a powder keg of simmering tensions, traitorous neighbors and underground defiance. Into this maelstrom, Maisie must convince Nazi officials she is Donat’s daughter and spirit him safely away before the Gestapo discovers his value.

 

Winspear has created a tale of emotional depth and moral conflict as Maisie struggles to reconcile her own experiences with what she has been called upon to perform. For while she is trying to free Donat, she has also been asked to assist the one person she holds accountable for her husband’s death.

 

Jacqueline Winspear has won the Agatha, Alex and Macavity awards for best first novel. If you like your mysteries with lots of historical atmosphere, a touch of spiritualism and a lot of spunk, Journey to Munich will surely deliver.


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The Summer Before the War

posted by: May 12, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Summer Before the WarThe 100th anniversary of the War to End All Wars has created a proliferation of popular fiction set during World War I. Standing head and shoulders above the crowd is Helen Simonson’s The Summer Before the War.

 

Agatha Kent has a well-ordered life as the wife of a British diplomat. She has travelled the world, and resides contentedly in the coastal Sussex town of Rye. Agatha is confident that her husband will succeed in his efforts to quell the quarrel in the Balkans and looks forward to a visit from her two nephews. Hugh is a brilliant young surgeon just finishing his studies. Daniel, the apple of his aunt’s eye, is a burgeoning poet of great promise. The only potential tempest on the horizon is Agatha’s arrangement to hire a female Latin instructor for the local school.

 

Beatrice Nash has lost her beloved father and must find a way to support herself. Her inheritance has been tied up in a trust controlled by relatives who do not believe a single woman should be without the protection of a man. Fleeing their plans to marry her off, she has accepted the position of Latin instructor in an insular English village. The daughter of a respected writer, Beatrice is well-traveled and highly educated. Her new role, as well as her independence of spirit, presents a challenge to the rigid hierarchy of the town. As the summer deepens, everyone must face a far greater threat to their way of life; the German invasion of Belgium brings reality as well as refugees.

 

Simonson’s debut novel Major Pettigrew’s Last Stand is an international bestseller. The Summer Before the War is an insightful, witty, haunting portrait that will surely captivate its readers.


 
 

The Road to Little Dribbling

posted by: April 25, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Road to Little DribblingTravel with Bill Bryson through this green and pleasant land known as England in The Road to Little Dribbling: Adventures of an American in Britain. An unabashed Anglophile, Bryson takes us on a tour via an imaginary line he has drawn from Bognor Regis in the south to Cape Wrath in the north, which he declares the Bryson Line. According to the author, if you are asked the southernmost and northernmost locations on the island for the citizenship exam, the British government gets it wrong. Bryson then sets out to prove the greatest gulf between Americans and Brits is the bond of a common language.

 

Bryson mourns the passing of stately old homes and dedicated gardeners while rejoicing in the new respect for the British landscape. We visit sites as famous as Stonehenge and as obscure as Grimsby’s Fishing Heritage Center. Bryson fumbles with the foibles of the National Trust, tangles with the terror of cow attacks and notes the depletion of his funds for everything from parking to admission tickets. Regardless of the occasional rudeness, lack of garbage facilities and the proliferation of slouchy hats and baggy pants, it’s Bryson’s wit and wisdom that shines through. We are introduced to the uniqueness that is England while reminded that, at the end of the day, we all share our humanness.

 

Bryson is the author of The New York Times bestseller A Walk in the Woods. His earlier works include Notes from a Small Island, Neither Here Nor There and The Lost Continent. The author and his family lived in England for 20 years. He now resides in Hanover, New Hampshire, and retains dual citizenship.


 
 

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