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Leanne Farrell

Leanne's first memory is walking down a tree-lined street to the public library, and she hasn't been without a book since. Leanne enjoys narrative non-fiction and biographies, literary fiction and children and teen fiction, but her favorites are mysteries and thrillers. A native Marylander, when her nose isn't in a book, you'll find her rooting for the Orioles and the Ravens.

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Mrs. Roosevelt’s Confidante

posted by: November 11, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Mrs. Roosevelt's ConfidanteIt’s December 1941, and a slumbering country awakes to the realities of war in Susan Elia MacNeal’s Mrs. Roosevelt’s Confidante. Maggie Hope returns to America as part of Winston Churchill’s entourage. In the wake of Pearl Harbor, the United States and Great Britain cement their ties and discuss strategy at the White House. During this delicate stage in their relationship, political enemies of the Roosevelts’ and their New Deal will do anything to harass the President — even if it undermines the war effort.


Mrs. Roosevelt, always passionate about domestic affairs, becomes involved in the scheduled execution of a 15-year-old sharecropper who shot a Virginia landowner. The President is now focused on winning the war and preventing the descent of a new Dark Age. In order to do this, he must have the support of the entire country, including the Jim Crow South. Virginia’s governor sees a way to disgrace the Roosevelt administration and simultaneously reduce the public pressure to reprieve the young inmate. His henchman sees a way to get into the governor’s good graces and ride his coattails into the White House. Maggie Hope must find a way to protect Eleanor Roosevelt from scandal, support the President’s strong leadership position and thus save Britain from Nazi rule.  


Once again, Susan Elia MacNeal provides a strong sense of place and captures the uncertainty of that turbulent time. It is a fascinating portal into the society of the 1940s; the marginalized role of women, the powerlessness of the minority, the awful power vested in the politicians we trust. Fans of Jacqueline Winspear, Charles Todd and James Benn will appreciate the strong characters and the exploration of subjects we often forget. While we tend to think of World War II as the time everyone came together for a common cause, the reality was far from this idealized picture. 



posted by: October 27, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for 1944 by Jay WinikJay Winik chronicles the final push toward a WWII victory in 1944: FDR and Year That Changed History. By 1944, the Allies expected to win the war. There were no illusions: They knew the terrible cost it would entail. Franklin Delano Roosevelt maintained a coalition of contentious rivals who, in ordinary times, would have been natural enemies. Roosevelt faced some of the biggest challenges in our history: a struggling economy that threatened our democracy, an isolationist sentiment that shunned foreign involvement and the insatiable greed of fascism as it gobbled up country after country. All the while, the presidency took its toll on his health. FDR was clearly dying.


The book also discusses the atrocities being committed to Jews. The dread of Jewish families as the full meaning of their plight is understood is heartbreaking. The detailed account of the escape of two Jewish men from Auschwitz is taut and gripping.


Winik skips back and forth through the era, documenting events in 1944 and then backtracking to FDR’s political rise. Winik indicts FDR and his administration for failing to take direct action against the Nazis’ diabolical “Final Solution.” Historians have long debated whether Roosevelt could have done more militarily to disrupt or alleviate the Holocaust. His choice to concentrate on winning the war will remain controversial.


Jay Winik is a respected historian and his writing well executed. He is the author of New York Times bestselling April 1865 and The Great Upheaval. World War II enthusiasts will enjoy the backseat view of a beleaguered president as he maneuvers through the minefields of war and politics.


In the Dark Places

posted by: September 28, 2015 - 7:00am

In the Dark PlacesWhat appears to be the mundane investigation of a stolen farm tractor becomes a tangle of lies and a conspiracy of fools in Peter Robinson’s In the Dark Places. How is it possible for such a large piece of equipment to disappear so completely? An abandoned airplane hangar, the perfect location to transfer stolen goods, may be the answer, and there is ample evidence a murder has been committed at the site. This leads to the investigation of the sudden disappearance of two young men, one the son of a local farmer. 


The missing boy's girlfriend may be the key to finding the missing men. While Detective Annie Cabbot guards the potential witness, Detective Winsome Jackman is working closely with Terry Gilchrist, the witness who found the bloody crime scene, but the recently returned veteran of Afghanistan is far more interested in Winsome than he is in solving the crime. The body count rises when a fateful auto accident high in the Yorkshire hills reaps a grim harvest. 


Peter Robinson draws on the brooding atmosphere of the Yorkshire hills setting to examine the theme of isolation — in both the physical surroundings and in the lives of the characters. Taut, suspenseful, with a richly developed storyline and unforgettable characters, In the Dark Places is headed for award territory. Once you have read this novel, you’ll be sure to add Robinson to your must-read list. Readers of Ruth Rendell, Deborah Crombie and P.D. James will be delighted they discovered Robinson’s Inspector Banks. 


Down Among the Dead Men

posted by: September 16, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Down Among the Dead Men by Peter LoveseyWhat do a car thief, an art teacher, a suspended police officer and multiple missing persons have in common? To find out, Peter Diamond must go Down Among the Dead Men.


A small-time car thief just trying to earn a living snags a BMW. This becomes the worst mistake of his life. Pulled over by suspicious constables, a search of the car finds one very dead body. Convicted as an accessory to murder, he lands in the pokey for a very long stretch.


Superintendent Peter Diamond is coerced by his boss, Assistant Chief Constable Georgina Dallymore, to investigate a colleague’s breach of professional ethics. Ever the self-promoter, Dallymore expects to play a little golf with her superiors while Diamond brings in a result. To his dismay, he discovers the suspended officer in question is Henrietta Mallin, an excellent detective he has worked with in the past. Mallin admits that she received DNA results implicating her niece in a crime and failed to follow up. Diamond discovers the incident occurred three years before and the top brass knew it, yet chose not to pursue the issue at the time.


At the time of her suspension, Mallin was investigating a disturbing number of missing persons in one geographical area. The most difficult part of committing murder is getting rid of the body. What if someone simply disappeared and never reappeared? If all those missing persons turn up dead and the murder rate skyrockets, it would create a catastrophe for the division brass. As Diamond seeks the evidence to exonerate Mallin, he must navigate a minefield of egos — most especially Dallymore’s.


Peter Lovesey, a recipient of the Agatha Lifetime Achievement Award, writes a narrative that is both suspenseful and convincing. If you enjoy Elizabeth George, Stephen Booth and Colin Dexter, you’ll add Peter Lovesey to your list of must-read authors.



Scents and Sensibility

posted by: September 14, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Scents and SensibilityPrivate investigator Bernie Little and his canine companion Chet come to the rescue in Spencer Quinn's newest caper, Scents and Sensibility. Upon returning home from their adventures in our nation’s capital, Chet and Bernie are confronted with two thefts. The first affects their elderly neighbor, Mr. Parsons, the recipient of an illegally procured saguaro cactus. The second affects Bernie directly — his grandfather’s antique watch, Bernie’s prized possession, is stolen. Both of these incidents appear to be related to the neighbor’s son, recently released from prison and looking for fast cash. Bernie, ever the stalwart defender of the underdog, is outraged at the treatment his neighbor receives at the hands of one bureaucrat, who is equally outraged at the threat to the desert environment.


Doggedly determined to dig his neighbor out of trouble, Bernie and Chet head for the desert to investigate. There, they find the unfortunate bureaucrat, dead at the bottom of a hole recently occupied by a saguaro.  Obviously, there’s a lot more at stake here than just a few stolen cacti. As they investigate, they discover links to drug smuggling and a long ago kidnapping. They also have their fair share of troubles with the opposite sex. Bernie is maintaining a long-distance relationship, and Chet is introduced to a puppy who looks and even acts an awful lot like him.  

The delightful tales of Chet and Bernie are narrated from the dog’s perspective. Chet has limited understanding of his surroundings and he's often distracted by squirrels, cats, flies and the occasional female. Chet’s thought processes are laugh out loud funny, and his absolute devotion to Bernie is deeply touching. Bernie may be the brains of the outfit, but Chet’s deep loyalty often saves the day.


This is the eighth book in the Chet and Bernie mysteries, which started with Dog On It. The plots are original and refreshing, the mysteries are well-plotted and the characters are genuine. Whether you are looking for an engaging read or an audio book for a road trip, you can’t go wrong with this series.




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