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Jeanne Andrews

Violent crime, serial killers, and sociopaths are the subjects for some of Jeannie Andrews' favorite fictional reading material. This fact surprises many of Jeannie's friends as her personality tends more to mirror Giselle from the Disney movie Enchanted than Jack Torrance from The Shining. She can be found at the Towson Branch where she is quick with a smile and happy to help patrons find just the right book for their mood. She is also a big fan of mysteries, historical fiction and teen novels, which provide a nice balance to the super charged, adrenaline packed thrill rides that keep her up late into the night.

 

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Librarians

The Cost of College

The Cost of College

posted by:
September 10, 2013 - 7:00am

The TestingThe Earth has been horrifically damaged by the Seven Stages War. Water supplies are contaminated by nuclear waste, vegetation obliterated and mutations of animals and humans roam the wild charred remains of North America. There are 18 colonies of survivors throughout the land who are governed by the United Commonwealth, with the mission of regenerating the Earth and improving the quality of life. Their method for choosing the future leaders of the land is simple, selecting only the very brightest students from each colony, they offer this elite group an opportunity for The Testing. If successful, they go on to University where they will learn skills to continue improving their world. The Testing by Joelle Charbonneau chronicles these challenges as faced by Cia Vale, and her specifically chosen peers. 

 

Cia has always tried her best in school in the hope that she may qualify for The Testing, and a University education just like her father. When she learns she has been picked to go to Tosu City she is overjoyed, although her father’s reaction is much more reserved.  He tells her about terrible nightmares of events he thinks may have taken place, but because of the mandatory mind wipe he has never been certain what was real. The only words of advice he can offer are “trust no one.”  120 students have been selected for Testing, yet only 20 will be offered coveted positions at the University, and failure in any of the four stages has severe consequences. Cia quickly learns that more is on the line than her future education, her very life is in danger. 

 

Readers who enjoyed The Hunger Games will not want to miss this debut book from Charbonneau, which is also the first of a trilogy. The Testing requires more than intelligence and instinct to survive, and some of the students will do whatever it takes in improve their odds.  Cia’s optimism and altruistic values in the face of the United Commonwealth’s sinister methods are also endangered. Will she ultimately sacrifice her humanity in order to pass The Testing? 

Jeanne

 
 

A Cry for Help

A Cry for Help

posted by:
August 29, 2013 - 7:00am

A Conspiracy of Faith cover artA bottle is discovered off of the coast of Scotland. Inside is a message written in blood. Once it's determined that note is written in Icelandic, the case becomes another mystery for Department Q. A Conspiracy of Faith is the third Department Q novel written by Jussi Adler-Olsen and is the winner of the Nordic crime-writing honor The Glass Key Award. He is in excellent company as previous winners have included Stieg Larsson, Jo Nesbo and Henning Mankell. Readers who enjoy these authors won’t want to miss out on this thrilling story.
 

A Conspiracy of Faith follows two primary storylines. Detective Carl Morck and his team work to decipher the damaged and decaying note found in the bottle and determine the identity of the author. Simultaneously, the reader follows a serial killer as he methodically plans to take his next victims. Although the message is determined to be several years old, Department Q works to find its origin, completely unaware that a similar crime is about to occur at the same location.
 

Jussi Adler-Olsen creates a cast of characters that are as real as they are complex. He establishes an authentic police environment as well as interesting interpersonal relationships, which draw the reader into the story. The novel moves along at an exciting pace and builds in intensity towards the dynamic conclusion.

Jeanne

 
 

The Ghostbusters of Dundalk

The Ghostbusters of Dundalk

posted by:
August 19, 2013 - 7:00am

Help for the HauntedSylvie Mason’s family life is anything but ordinary. Her parents earn a living exorcising tormented souls and traveling the country giving lectures on these experiences. Her older sister Rose rebels at every opportunity, and has a serious mean streak. There is also a possessed Raggedy Ann doll caged in her basement. Things aren’t any easier at school where Sylvie faces constant ridicule from classmates as a result of the bizarre stories circulating regarding her parents. Then tragedy strikes one stormy night when her father and mother are gunned down in their church, which is where Help for the Haunted by John Searles begins. These senseless murders set the tone for this cryptic and eerie novel.

 

The story is presented from two different perspectives with chapters alternating in time between present day, and life in the Mason household before the murders. Searles authentically captures Sylvie’s 14-year-old voice throughout the course of the novel, from her frustration with her sister and worry for her mother, to her overwhelming desire to say what people want to hear. This character driven story is also swathed with shadow and uncertainty as unexplained events keep the element of mystery growing. Searles joins the esteemed company of Laura Lippman and Martha Grimes in setting his suspenseful and creepy novel in a Baltimore County community. Readers will appreciate the many local Dundalk references and landmarks, which punctuate the story and lend it an air of authenticity. The mystery of what really occurred on the night of the murders drives the story to an exciting and astonishing conclusion. Help for the Haunted is a fascinating novel that puts a different spin on the traditional ghost story.

Jeanne

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Bottom of the Heap

Bottom of the Heap

posted by:
July 12, 2013 - 8:15am

The Painted GirlsWhat does the future hold for three young girls when their father dies expectantly? Well if the year is 1878 and you are living an impoverished neighborhood on the lower slope of Montmartre in Paris, the answer would be despair. These are the circumstances framing the setting of The Painted Girls, the newest novel by Cathy Marie Buchanan. In this story we meet the van Goethem sisters and follow their struggles as they put their childhood behind them and are forced to earn a wage to prevent being thrown penniless into the streets. The main role of caregiver is taken on by Antoinette, the eldest sister, filling in for their mother who is more interested in drinking absinthe than raising the children. Middle sister Marie abandons her education to join the Paris Opera with her youngest sister Charlotte. Training for the ballet pays seventeen francs a week, though it is still barely enough to put food on the table. Once she is discovered by Edgar Degas, Marie starts on a journey that will culminate in one of the artist’s most famous creations, Little Dancer Aged Fourteen.

 

This is an absorbing story based on the lives of individuals during this period of history. The author’s attention to detail paints the dire circumstances the girls find themselves in as well as the dark and seedy elements that threaten to engulf them. By observing how the sisters grow throughout the story and the importance of their love for each other, Buchanan creates a remarkable novel, as captivating as it is enlightening.

 

Jeanne

 
 

Living in the 100 Acre Woods

Living in the 100 Acre Woods

posted by:
June 25, 2013 - 7:55am

If You Find MeFourteen-year-old Carey Blackburn can shoot a rabbit and cook it for dinner, raise her baby sister by herself, and survive freezing winters in an old camper without electricity, but can she handle attending high school? From the first page of If You Find Me by Emily Murdoch, it is obvious that this is not your typical teen coming of age story. Carey has spent the last ten years living in a secluded part of a national forest with her methamphetamine addicted mother. Raised on the story they had fled her abusive father and needed to hide to stay safe, her life in the woods have made her independent and strong. Her little sister Jenessa is the most important thing in her world and Carey’s every thought is about how to care for and educate her. Their mother leaves them alone for weeks at a time, until she ultimately abandons them altogether. The girls have endured countless difficulties, but can they manage in the civilized world once their camp is discovered by their father and a social worker.

 

This touching and powerful story is told from Carey’s perspective, with a backwoods dialect she tries desperately to lose. Her life experience means that she behaves much older than a typical 14-year-old; however these skills are of little value when it comes to fitting in at high school. She doesn’t know what a locker is, can’t understand teen fashion or cell phones, and has never spoken to a boy. Carey needs every bit of the willpower that ensured her survival to adapt to the new situations she encounters in the outside world.  The reader cares deeply for the characters and gets invested in trying to learn what the secret of the “white star night” that has led to Jenessa’s inability to speak. If You Find Me explores the healing power of family and ultimately the definition of home.

Jeanne

 
 

Haunted by Family Secrets

Haunted by Family Secrets

posted by:
May 20, 2013 - 10:34am

Little WolvesSmall town life, folklore, Norse mythology and a senseless murder are all threads skillfully woven together into the amazing literary work Little Wolves by Thomas James Maltman. A farming community, inhabited by descendants of the first German families to settle the area, is rocked when a troubled teen murders the town sheriff and then commits suicide. The boy’s father is left devastated and confused; unable to understand what possessed his son to perpetrate such an awful crime.  

 

As the new pastor tries to help his congregation heal, his pregnant wife Clara struggles with the knowledge that she was also an intended victim. She believes herself to be haunted by the boy, who was a student in her English class at the high school. Clara, herself a student of ancient literature, focuses on Old English words and phrases to calm herself in times of stress. As a result, the novel is peppered with interesting vocabulary from a lost era, which adds an almost mystical element.

 

The mystery of what really brought Clara and her husband to this remote area from the city, as well as the unanswered questions from the shooting, keep the reader captivated. A reoccurring element of the story is the presence of the wolves. Wolves play an omnipresent role in the tales Clara’s father would tell her as a child, now wolves have started coming into the town at night; they haunt her dreams and fill the residents with fear. This is an intriguing novel, beautifully written and full of suspense.

Jeanne

 
 

Living in the Dark

Living in the Dark

posted by:
April 16, 2013 - 8:59am

What We Saw at NightA deadly allergy to the sun, and a sport which involves jumping off skyscrapers  - what at first glance may appear to be a work of science fiction, is actually Jacquelyn Mitchard's new teen novel What We Saw at Night. Allie Kim and her two best friends, Rob and Juliet, have a rare disease known as Xeroderma Pigmentosum. This is an inherited genetic disorder which manifests as an extreme sensitivity to ultraviolet light, and in some cases neurological complications. The three teens must spend their waking hours at night because exposure to the sun can be lethal. It is an isolated kind of existence that fosters a tight bind between the friends. When Juliet, the most adventurous of the trio decides to take up Parkour, her friends join her in learning this extreme sport which involves climbing, jumping, and tumbling between buildings. A dangerous sport during normal daylight hours, it takes on a new level of risk as they work to master the techniques at night.

 

During one evening of building jumping, the friends see something that changes everything. After landing a particularly difficult jump onto the balcony of an apartment building, they see what appears to be a murder. Tension develops as Allie and her friends have different ideas regarding what was actually witnessed.  The tone of the novel takes on a sinister feeling as Allie tries to uncover if a young woman was actually killed at the hands of a man in the vacant apartment. Her inquiries have attracted the attention of someone who could prove to be even more deadly than her disease. Learn what life is like with Xeroderma, discover the exciting sport of Parkour, and relish What We Saw at Night.

Jeanne

 
 

Haunted by the Past

Haunted by the Past

posted by:
March 18, 2013 - 7:45am

A Killer in the WindDan Champion was an undercover cop with the NYPD, on fire with ambition and with no regard for overtime caps or departmental boundaries. While combing through old case files, he discovers references to the “Fat Woman,” a mysterious, legendary monster, responsible for countless human trafficking purchases and subsequent murders. His obsession with finding her and the consequences of this personal mission are the driving force of A Killer in the Wind by Andrew Klavan.

 

A sting operation Champion has arranged to bring down the Fat Woman falls apart, resulting in the loss of his job and exile to a sheriff’s office in rural New York State. During his pursuit of the Fat Woman he took a street drug as a sleep aid, and he has since been haunted by ghosts and hallucinations. These visions raise many disturbing questions for Champion. How does he know the ghost boy’s name is Alexander? Why is the woman in his vision so familiar that he believes he could be in love with her? His life is turned upside down when a woman’s body pulled from the river turns out to be the very woman from his visions. The only words she utters before falling unconscious are “They are coming for us.”

 

Klavan is an international best-selling author, gifted in writing all things action and adventure. A Killer in the Wind is fast-moving and adrenaline-charged as the author utilizes bursts of short sentences and strategically placed repetition to create an effect that propels the story forward by matching pace with the action. This adult thriller is just a step darker than his teen series The Homelanders, the first of which has been optioned as a feature film. In both cases, he proves to be masterful at sweeping readers up in a mysterious suspense-filled novel and taking them on a wild ride to the stunning conclusion. 

 

Jeanne

 
 

There Was a Hole

There Was a Hole

posted by:
February 12, 2013 - 8:55am

FitzFitzgerald McGrath is a 15-year-old boy who lives with his mom in St. Paul, plays guitar in a band with his best friend, and has a crush on a pretty red head at school. On the surface, he appears to be an average teenage kid. However, readers soon find out that he has a turbulent, pain-riddled side to his personality, which has progressed to the breaking point. Fitz, by Mick Cochrane is a skillfully crafted novel which explores the impact and consequences of a boy who never had a father.

 

From childhood fantasies of a loving Dad who watches him from afar, to seething anger toward a man that has never been in touch, the reader easily identifies with Fitz’s anguish. Not knowing anything about his father, other than his once-a-month monetary contribution to the household, has gotten to be too much for Fitz to handle. Taking matters into his own hands, Fitz purchases a Smith & Wesson .38 Special and kidnaps his father. What follows is a day that will forever change both of their lives.

 

This bittersweet novel establishes characters the reader will completely empathize with, being in turn both hopeful and fearful regarding the story’s outcome. The steady and measured rhythm provides a perfect balance for the intensity of emotion experienced by both father and son. The climax of the story will have people holding their breath. In Fitz’s own words, “It feels like the longest day of his life. It also feels like the shortest” and there isn’t a reader who will want it to end.

Jeanne

 
 

Cold Case Conundrum

Cold Case Conundrum

posted by:
January 14, 2013 - 9:15am

The Hiding PlaceThere are some murder cases that just haunt you. Detective Stynes was new to his career in law enforcement when 4-year-old Justin Manning disappeared from a community park and was subsequently found dead several weeks later. The Hiding Place by David Bell is a multifaceted story exploring the lives and relationships of Justin’s family and their acquaintances. The title could reference the shallow grave where his body was discovered or the location where the truth to this clever puzzle resides.

 

After 25-years, there is renewed interest in the Manning case as the black man convicted of the crime is finally released from jail. Dante Rogers has always maintained his innocence and now with the case in the media spotlight, Stynes wonders if they actually arrested the correct person. Did the suspect’s race influence the police?  Was the testimony of the children playing at the park that day 100% reliable? Not for the first time, the detective commences second guessing his actions during the investigation.

 

Janet Manning and her daughter Ashleigh have recently moved back into her childhood home in Dove Point Ohio. Late one night a mysterious man appears at her door announcing he knows some secret information about Justin’s death. A few short days later her childhood friend Michael reappears after a 10 year absence. He was with her that tragic day in the park and questions her with a strong intensity about what she remembers from that day. Even Detective Stynes meets with his retired partner to ruminate if they did everything they could to find the killer. With all of the second guessing going on it is a safe bet that there is more to this story than what was initially believed. Bell has constructed a clever novel that is labyrinthine in its twists and turns, dead ends and surprises. Just when the reader thinks they have the mystery figured out … think again!

 

Jeanne