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Doug Beatty

Douglas Beatty grew up reading Agatha Christie, cheering for the Uncanny X-men and watching too many old black and white monster movies. This only strengthened his love for mysteries, graphic novels and horror books and keeps him ready for an impending zombie uprising. He also loves to cook, perform improvisational comedy and listen to pop music. He currently works in Mobile Library Services where he is always poised and ready to hand out another good book.

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Murders Old and New

Murders Old and New

posted by:
August 10, 2012 - 8:00am

Age of DoubtThe Age of Doubt by Andrea Camilleri is the latest mystery novel involving Sicilian detective Inspector Salvo Montalbano. There is a heavy rain, and the inspector is making his way to work when he comes across a young woman whose car is about to become submerged in water.  He rescues her and takes her home to dry off, and she tells him a story of a wealthy aunt, a luxury yacht and a speedboat that is docked in the port of Vigata. Soon after, the owner of the yacht calls the police as a dinghy has been discovered carrying a disfigured corpse. Montalbano heads to the scene and must discover the identity of the unknown man and if there is any connection between him and the crew of the yacht. He remembers the mysterious woman, but when he tries to locate her, he finds that she has mysteriously vanished. Told with a wry sense of humor, the reader will definitely enjoy Montalbano’s quirky style, his passion for Sicilian food and his romantic endeavors. He often uses non-traditional methods in solving the case, and there is enough action and suspense to keep the reader guessing.

 

In the novel, Camilleri also pays homage to the classic mystery writer Georges Simenon who published nearly 200 novels in his lifetime. Inspector Jules Maigret was his most famous character, and in Maigret and the Man on the Boulevard, Maigret must tackle the case of a man who was stabbed to death in an alley, but his wife insists that the shoes and tie he was wearing at the time of his death could not be his. Camilleri writes in a similar style to Simenon, the novels are light and breezy and make an interesting diversion featuring an exotic locale.

 

If you are in the mood for something new or wish to return to a classic tale, these mysteries would be perfect for the dog days of summer.

 

Doug

 
 

A Cautionary Tale

A Cautionary Tale

posted by:
July 24, 2012 - 8:00am

GetawayIn Getaway by Lisa Brackmann, we meet recently widowed Michelle Mason, at loose ends due to her late husband’s disastrous financial dealings that left her almost penniless. They had a pre-arranged vacation planned in Puerto Vallarta and Michelle decides to head there for a short vacation. One night, she meets a handsome stranger named Daniel and after too many margaritas she invites him to spend the night in her hotel room. By morning, the hotel has been broken into by two masked goons who seem to have a grudge with Daniel. Michelle tries to return home, but a mysterious “package” is planted in her handbag and she is forced to stay in Mexico. She is rescued by Gary, who has some connection to Daniel and appears to be in possession of her passport. Gary forces Michelle into a dangerous game of espionage and it soon becomes apparent that she has no one she can trust. For a widow alone in Mexico, what is a woman to do?

 

Brackmann creates a wonderfully wild and incredibly readable thriller with Getaway. The setting and descriptions of Puerto Vallarta make this a perfect summer read for sitting on a beach or the balcony of a cruise ship. The suspense builds quickly and intensifies to the point where the reader will need to turn the pages quickly to get to the end. Michelle is a likeable heroine, with enough pluck and vigor to be able to weasel out of dire situations. Getaway is great for readers who like to follow a strong female who refuses the role of victim. 

Doug

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Murder in Tokyo

Murder in Tokyo

posted by:
July 19, 2012 - 8:01am

People Who Eat DarknessPeople Who Eat Darkness: The True Story of a Young Woman Who Vanished from the Streets of Tokyo and the Evil That Swallowed Her Up by Richard Lloyd Perry chronicles the disappearance of hostess Lucie Blackman in the summer of 2000, and the investigation that followed.  Blackman, a British citizen, had been working as a flight attendant for British Airways, but increasing debt made her consider a more lucrative career change.  Her best friend Louise had a connection to Tokyo and suggested that they join the ranks of foreign hostesses in the Roppongi district. 

 

Japanese men who have a desire to feel superior and important choose to visit hostess clubs, where tall, international women are trained to light their cigarettes, pour them drinks and keep them occupied by conversation so that their hourly rate will increase the longer they stay in the club.  A hostess can make bonuses by repeat business, or selling expensive bottles of champagne. But she must also arrange dates with the customers, at outside restaurants. Many hostesses are required to make five dates with a customer or risk losing her job. In July of 2000, Blackman made such a date. 

 

She called her friend Louise to tell her that she was going for a drive to the seaside and would be home later that evening. She called once more to let Louise know she was all right. Then she was never heard from again. It would be months before her body would be found and a suspect arrested. Her mother and father were divorced and barely speaking. She had two younger siblings wondering where she was. Many years would pass before there would be justice for Lucie Blackman.

 

Richard Lloyd Perry is the Asia editor and Tokyo bureau chief of The Times (London) and became fascinated by the case when he worked in Japan.  He wanted to pull the story together, to make Blackman into a real person and not just a sordid news headline, and with People Who Eat Darkness he has succeeded.  Thoroughly researched and very compelling, this is destined to become a true crime classic along the lines of Truman Capote’s In Cold  Blood

Doug

 
 

A Mother’s Love

A Mother’s Love

posted by:
July 13, 2012 - 8:45am

Afterwards“Motherhood isn't soft and cozy and sweet; it's selfish ferocity, red in tooth and claw.”

 

How far would you go to protect your child? In the novel Afterwards by Rosamund Lupton, Grace Covey is put to the ultimate test. She is attending sports day at her son’s school, and her seventeen year old daughter Jenny is on the top floor, working in the nurse’s office. The building catches fire and Grace races headlong into the building to save her daughter. She awakens in the hospital but all is not as it seems. She can see her body, in a coma, lying in a hospital bed, and quickly realizes that her daughter Jenny is in a similar situation, severely burned but also having an “out of body” experience. Both women are able to see and hear what is happening around them, but are unable to communicate with anyone but each other.

 

Grace witnesses her husband’s pain and his inability to connect with their younger son, Adam. Adam withdraws into himself since he has no one to comfort him. Grace’s sister-in-law Sarah is a police officer and when the cause of the fire turns out to be arson, Sarah starts working on the case to discover the culprit. Grace and Jenny are looking for answers and find themselves privy to conversations with people who don’t know they are there.

 

This is Lupton’s second novel, after her hugely popular Sister, and she truly creates a unique reading experience. The novel is written from Grace’s point of view, and although she is having a strange experience, the core of the novel is her fierce love for her children and her strong desire for answers. The novel works as a suspenseful mystery and at times is very dramatic and even heartbreaking.  Afterwards is also an interesting character study, and Lupton really shines in her character development. You get to know the Covey family and are very curious to follow Grace to the novel’s conclusion. Readers who enjoyed The Lovely Bones by Alice Sebold and mystery lovers are sure to enjoy this novel.  

Doug

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Cozy Up This Summer

Cozy Up This Summer

posted by:
July 3, 2012 - 8:30am

Dead Man WaltzingHearse and BuggyThe Azalea AssaultIt may be hot outside, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get cozy with a good mystery. Join one of these three amateur sleuths this summer and see if you can figure out whodunit.

 

Dancing with the Stars may be over for the season but fans of ballroom dancing will be delighted to read Dead Man Waltzing by Ella Barrick. This is the second novel in the series, following Quickstep to Murder, featuring ballroom dance champion Stacy Graysin. When a well-known figure in ballroom dance is murdered and one of the instructor’s in Stacy’s dance studio is implicated, Stacy must find a way to clear his name and solve the murder.

 

A trip to the Amish country is a treat in the first book in a new series by Laura Bradford called Hearse and Buggy. Set in Heavenly, Pennsylvania, the story features Claire Weatherly and her Amish specialty shop, Heavenly Treasures. She hires a young Amish woman named Esther to work in the shop, but immediately finds trouble when the shop’s former owner is murdered and Esther becomes the prime suspect. Throw in a handsome detective named Jakob who has been ostracized for leaving the Amish community, and you have all the fixings for a promising new series.

 

If summer gardening is more your thing, try the Azalea Assault by Alyse Carlson, the first in the Garden Society Mystery series. Camellia Harris spends her time promoting the beautiful gardens of Roanoke Virginia, and is delighted when a national magazine sends a reporter to do a spread on one of these gardens. Her joy is short-lived when the world famous photographer arrives, proceeds to insult everyone in town, and turns up dead the next morning. Fortunately, Cam’s boyfriend is a reporter and the two immediately jump in to try and solve the case.

 

Doug

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On Foreign Shores

On Foreign Shores

posted by:
June 29, 2012 - 8:01am

Don't Cry Tai LakeThe StonecutterFans of mysteries set in exotic locales will be in luck this month, with two new mysteries from faraway lands.

 

Don’t Cry, Tai Lake by Qiu Xiaolong is set in Wuxi, China and features Inspector Chen Cao, the chief inspector of the Shanghai police department.  Inspector Chen earns a much needed vacation and heads to a private resort on Tai Lake, only to discover that the lake is heavily polluted by the toxic runoff from local manufacturing plants. Soon the director of one of these plants is found murdered, and an environmental activist is accused. A young woman named Shanshan is certain that the suspect is innocent and enlists Inspector Chen’s help in solving the crime.

 

Qui Xiaolong was born in Shanghai but now lives in St. Louis, Missouri with his family and currently writes his novels in the English language. Don’t Cry Tai Lake is the seventh novel featuring Inspector Chen, and brings awareness to the very real problem of water pollution in China. The series began with Death of a Red Heroine in 2000.

 

Bundle up and head to Sweden to discover The Stonecutter by Camilla Lackberg. This novel features detective Patrick Hedstrom who travels to Fjallbacka to solve the murder of a little girl who was found in a fisherman’s net. Fjallbacka is a quiet resort town, idyllic on the surface, but containing dreadful secrets. The murder of Sara Florin will change the lives of the residents of the town and threaten to tear Fjallbacka apart. 

 

The Stonecutter is the third in the Patrick Hedstrom series, following The Ice Princess and The Preacher. Lackberg was an economist in Stockholm, Sweden, but quickly realized her dream was writing crime novels. Today she is one of the top female authors in Sweden. She was born in Fjallbacka in 1974 and with The Stonecutter she revisits her childhood home.

 

If you can’t take a vacation to these exotic locales this summer, be sure to visit them in these great new mystery novels.

Doug

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Portrait of the Artist as a Graphic Novelist

A Zoo in WinterThe graphic novel A Zoo in Winter by Jiro Taniguchi follows a young man named Hamaguchi, who is working for a fabric printing factory in 1966. He is unsettled there; he wants to design his own fabric but is thwarted by the boss, and needs to find more creative employment. Hamaguchi heads to Tokyo and becomes an assistant at a magazine that publishes manga, then a new art form. So begins his journey as an artist.

 

The story offers quiet realism. Black and white illustrations are beautifully drawn and the characters take on a life of their own. Quiet and thoughtful, Hamaguchi struggles to find his place in the world. Suddenly he’s thrust into an urban setting with quirky “artist types” who work odd hours and drink too much. Taniguchi captures them visually, each drawn expression conveying abundant emotion.  The story is gentle but at the same time compelling. You want to know more about Hamaguchi’s life and his art.  You want to see him succeed.

 

The work also offers a look into the history of manga and a bit of Japanese culture. These are nicely woven into the story and become a backdrop for the tale without becoming overwhelming. Regular graphic novel readers will be interested to see more from this artist, but even those who only casually approach the genre will enjoy an engrossing biographical story about an extremely likeable character. A Zoo in Winter is a terrific graphic novel, destined to become a classic.  

Doug

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Slow Burn

Slow Burn

posted by:
June 15, 2012 - 8:01am

Coral GlynnLovers of historical fiction will want to check out Coral Glynn by Peter Cameron. The novel begins in 1950s England after the war has ended. Coral Glynn, a young nurse, heads to Hart House to care for the aging Mrs. Hart. Also living in the house is Major Clement Hart, who was injured in the war and is dealing with demons of his own. The Major is suffering from repressed sexuality and a confusing love for his childhood friend, Robin Lofting. Mrs. Prence, the irascible housekeeper, takes an instant dislike to Coral, and upon the unexpected death of Mrs. Hart she harbors many suspicions about the new live-in nurse. When an unexpected proposal happens, followed by a disturbing event in the nearby woods, the lives of the characters begin to change in wholly unexpected ways.

 

The English countryside in 1950 is the perfect setting for these characters; each comes with baggage and is very unsure of what the future holds. Cameron slowly reveals facts about Coral, drawing out the mystery as there is more to her than first meets the eye and the reader will become intrigued by her and the decisions she is forced to make. The magic of Coral Glynn revolves around the characters, their hidden secrets and desires, and missed opportunities.

 

Fans of Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca should enjoy this story. Like Rebecca, Coral is living alone in a strange setting with an unknown gentleman and a distant and unlikeable housekeeper. Coral Glynn is a quiet novel that sneaks up on the reader, with the beautiful writing, quietly revealing plot details while introducing the reader to several characters they will want to get to know and spend time with.  Appealing for anyone that wants a character-driven story with a hint of mystery and suspense, this title will also be perfect for book clubs.

Doug

 
 

Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous

Born to be BradYou Have No Idea: A Famous Daughter, Her No-Nonsense Mother, and How They Survived Pageants, Hollywood, Love, Loss (and Each Other) chronicles the career of the multitalented and lovely Vanessa Williams. Readers will know her most recently from her appearance on Desperate Housewives, but her earliest claim to fame was in 1983, becoming the first African-American Miss America. She was soon forced to resign when nude pictures surfaced. Recovering from the scandal, Vanessa became a sensation in the world of popular music, theater, movies, and eventually television. Her loving, supportive mother Helen, a retired vocal music teacher, has always been instrumental in her success. Helen herself offers some insightful thoughts on what it is like to raise a famous daughter. You Have No Idea, co-written by mother and daughter, has a light, conversational tone and includes wonderful personal family photographs. It is perfect for fans who would like to get to know Vanessa better, and for anyone looking for an inspirational story of a strong bond between mother and daughter.

 

The compulsively readable Born to be Brad: My Life and Style, So Far, is the first memoir from reality TV show star and fashion icon Brad Goreski.  Best known as Rachel’s assistant on the Rachel Zoe Project, Goreski is immediately recognized for his colorful clothing palate, bow ties, and dark retro glasses. Here he recounts stories from his troubled childhood in Port Perry, Canada, where his sense of glamour made him the odd boy out at school. Who knew styling Barbie dolls would eventually lead to an internship at Vogue? Not only does he dish on his rise to fame, but he also offers fashion tips to readers: items every woman needs in her closet, what to wear when traveling by air, and how to pack for a weeklong vacation in ten minutes.

Doug

 
 

Cozies and Kitties

Cozies and Kitties

posted by:
May 4, 2012 - 3:01am

Copycat KillingThe Cat, the Wife, and the WeaponA Killer ReadCozy mysteries do their best to appeal to cat lovers, and some recent releases will definitely introduce you to some friendly felines.

 

Sofie Kelly is back with Copycat Killing featuring librarian Kathleen Paulson and her two magical cats, Own and Hercules.  In this particular outing, Kathleen is helping some local artists rescue their artwork when a deluge threatens to flood their studio. Unfortunately for one of the artists, they may have created their last piece. This is the second in the series, following Curiosity Thrilled the Cat. Penguin is republishing the first of the series as part of their “Read Humane” campaign, and donating $25,000 to the Humane Society’s Animal Rescue Team, for the prevention of cruelty towards animals.

 

The newest Cats in Trouble mystery is set in Mercy, South Carolina and features quilter Jillian Hart. Jillian is searching for her friend Tom, who has gone missing. Meanwhile, Tom’s half-brother moves into his house and proceeds to lose his diabetic cat.  The Cat, the Wife, and the Weapon, written by Leann Sweeney, also features a trio of cats as well as a rat terrier helping to solve the mystery. This is the fourth in the Cats in Trouble series.

 

A Killer Read is the beginning of a new series by Erika Chase and features Lizzie Turner and the Ashton Corners Mystery Readers and Cheese Straws Society.  When the Society gathers in a Southern mansion for their book club meeting, the members find themselves embroiled in an actual mystery when a stranger is shot with an antique gun.  References to well-known mystery novels abound and readers meet a unique pair of cats named Edam and Brie. 

 

So cuddle up with someone you love, either the two-footed or four-footed variety, and read one of these great new cozies.  You will be glad you did!

Doug

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