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Doug Beatty

Douglas Beatty grew up reading Agatha Christie, cheering for the Uncanny X-men and watching too many old black and white monster movies. This only strengthened his love for mysteries, graphic novels and horror books and keeps him ready for an impending zombie uprising. He also loves to cook, perform improvisational comedy and listen to pop music. He currently works in Mobile Library Services where he is always poised and ready to hand out another good book.

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Agatha’s Greatest Hits

Agatha’s Greatest Hits

posted by:
July 31, 2013 - 6:00am

Elephants Can Remember cover imageCurtain image coverFans of Agatha Christie have much to rejoice this year, as the final five Poirot novels adapted to films by the BBC have been completed and will air in the United States later this year. David Suchet has been playing Poirot since 1989 and, in the end, will have filmed 70 episodes, including several full-length movies featuring Christie’s well-know Belgian detective.

 

The final films include Elephants Can Remember, based on a novel featuring Christie’s delightful recurring character, mystery novelist Ariadne Oliver. Ariadne’s goddaughter Celia’s life is shrouded in mystery as Celia's parents perished in an apparent double suicide. There could be more to the story, and as Ariadne begins to dig, she will need the help of Hercule Poirot to get to the bottom of the case.   

 

The final film will, of course, be based on Christie’s last Poirot novel, Curtain. Christie wrote Curtain in the 1940’s to give closure to the Poirot series, and the novel was locked in a bank vault and never published until after her death in the 1970s. Poirot is ailing and his body is beginning to break down, even though his mind is as sharp as ever.  He returns with Captain Hastings to the scene of their first mystery together with concerns of his own. He will have to use Captain Hastings as his eyes and ears to find a devious killer who may have acted more than once in committing horrible crimes.

 

The final films will be bittersweet, as fans always had that next film or episode to look forward to, but now is a great time to brush up on your Christie and read the words that inspired the movies.

Doug

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Wedding Bell Blues

Wedding Bell Blues

posted by:
July 24, 2013 - 6:55am

Cover art for Revenge Wears PradaIn Revenge Wears Prada by Lauren Weisberger, we catch up with Andy Sachs, the ill-used assistant to Runway editor Miranda Priestly in the previous novel, The Devil Wears Prada. Ten years have passed, and Andy, after years of therapy, has started a rather successful magazine. In an unusual turn of events, she became reacquainted with Emily Charlton, the first assistant to Miranda and Andy’s sworn nemesis. The two women were able to put past differences aside and become fast friends.  Andy is now working as a writer for a wedding blog. Emily thinks they can turn this idea into magazine gold.  It doesn’t hurt that they're able to drop Miranda’s name to help them gain access to celebrities who then would let them photograph their elaborate and sophisticated weddings. Thus, The Plunge is born. In order to gain capital for the start-up costs, Emily arranges some meetings with potential investors. Andy meets charming Max Harrison, the son of a media mogul, at one of these meetings and sparks fly. Soon, Andy is out looking for a wedding dress of her own and preparing to walk down the aisle. Max’s mother makes it perfectly clear to Andy that she is not Harrison material, putting a damper on the proceedings. But Andy had faced a much bigger devil in the form of Miranda Priestly. She never realized that Miranda would play a part in her destiny.

 

Those who liked the first novel will enjoy catching up with Andy in the sequel, and with some of the characters from the first novel who pop up in surprise cameos. The audio version of the novel is read by Smash star Megan Hilty, and her delightful reading adds to the enjoyment of this novel.
 

Doug

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Twice as Nice

Twice as Nice

posted by:
July 12, 2013 - 6:45am

Wedding NightFans of Sophie Kinsella’s novels can always expect a charismatic, slightly flighty heroine winding up in madcap situations. In Wedding Night, the reader will be delighted to find two heroines, sisters, relaying the adventure in alternating chapters. Lottie is fully expecting her boyfriend Richard to propose to her during a romantic dinner. When he fails to do so, she is inconsolable. Her sister Fliss worries that Lottie is about to make another one of her “unfortunate choices”. This choice comes in the form of Ben, an old boyfriend she had spent some time with in Greece. Ben is also unmarried, and he and Lottie decide to tie the knot. Fliss is going through a horrible divorce and is fully aware of how disastrous a rushed marriage can be. Ben’s friend and work colleague Lorcan also desperately needs to talk to Ben about some important business matters. This prompts Fliss, Lorcan, Fliss’s son Noah and Lottie’s ex-boyfriend Richard to head en masse to a high-class resort hotel on a romantic Greek island in the hopes of preventing an almost inevitable honeymoon baby.

 

Sophie Kinsella is a true queen of chick lit, and this stand-alone novel is sure to please her fans. Known for her Shopaholic series, fans will recognize that character slightly in Lottie, the more flustered and impetuous sister. But Kinsella also creates a more serious, thoughtful heroine in Fliss, the wiser, more careful sister who will do almost anything to protect her sibling. The characters form a nice balance and make a great story that is also comes complete with Kinsella’s signature humor.

 

Doug

 
 

Old Sins Cast Long Shadows

Old Sins Cast Long Shadows

posted by:
July 5, 2013 - 7:10am

The Other ChildGerman author Charlotte Link creates a gripping mystery with The Other Child, her first novel translated for an English audience. In a small town nestled on the coast of Yorkshire, a young woman finishes a babysitting job and heads home. The lighted path ahead is blocked, forcing her to choose a darker and more desolate route. She never returns home. Meanwhile, a group of characters gather to celebrate the pending engagement of Gwen Beckett and Dave Tanner. Gwen, painfully shy and living at home with her father, is not the average blushing bride. Her friends and family fear that Tanner is only interested in procuring her hand to gain access to the farm and fulfill his plan to turn the farm into a bustling hotel. Fiona Barnes, an old matriarch and a close family friend, rails against the pending marriage and creates a scene at a dinner party. It is not long before Fiona is also found dead with her head smashed in, much like the young woman that was discovered earlier that week. Enter Detective Valerie Almond, a nervous detective who is unsure of her place in the police force and her ability to solve a crime. Will she be able to piece together the clues before the killer strikes again?

 

Link creates a great atmospheric thriller with psychological intensity. She also incorporates a story within a story as Fiona recounts a situation that happened long ago during the height of World War II. Many of the characters are tremendously flawed and the cast of suspects will keep the reader engaged in solving the mystery. Fans of Ruth Rendell and P.D. James will easily gravitate to this novel and look forward to the next one.

 

Doug

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Animal Love

Animal Love

posted by:
June 24, 2013 - 6:45am

The LovebirdIn a rather touching tale of self-discovery amidst the landscape of the animal rights movement, Natalie Brown’s debut novel The Lovebird introduces us to a flawed character searching for change who ultimately finds it in herself. Margie comes from a troubled childhood. Her father smokes and drinks too much and seems unwilling to accept the death of his wife. It seems only natural for Margie to discover another lost and lonely soul, a professor of Latin raising his daughter after the death of his wife. Simon offers her love but also the chance to fight for the small creatures of the earth. Margie becomes vegan and an active member of H.E.A.R.T. (Humans Encouraging Animal Rights Today) and begins to perform slightly unsavory acts for the benefit of nature. But a life event changes her course, and suddenly she is thrust into the leadership of H.E.A.R.T., and her decisions will affect the course of her life forever.

 

The Lovebird is an engrossing character study, following Margie’s thoughts in the first person. As her story unfolds, the reader feels a deep sympathy for a character that, although often misguided, has complete compassion and care for others. The story takes an unexpected turn in the middle and readers will be surprised and delighted by Margie’s journey. Natalie Brown’s prose is thoughtful and expertly crafted, so readers who appreciate a good turn of phrase will certainly enjoy her writing. The novel is heartfelt and inspiring with an ending that readers will remember, a perfect choice for book groups.

 

Doug

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Gothic Historic Revision

The AccursedLeave it to Joyce Carol Oates to pull together several unusual elements, well-known historical figures, a dash of the paranormal and tremendous historical detail. In her new novel, The Accursed, we meet the Slade family, who seem to be suffering the effects of a terrible curse. The daughter Annabel falls under the spell of a smooth-talking Southern gentleman named Axson Mayte, who may be more than he appears to be. Annabel’s brother Josiah will go to great lengths to protect his sister from harm. Wilhelmina Burr, their cousin, is plagued by visions of serpents while away at school. While the Slade family suffers, Woodrow Wilson, the current president of Princeton University, struggles to keep his post from a keen usurper bent on knocking him from his pedestal. But there are other figures lurking around Princeton as well. Grover Cleveland, suffering terribly from the death of his child, sees visions of her in dark hallways. Upton Sinclair, author of The Jungle, is convinced that the shadowy figure he spies leaving in a carriage with a man is his wife. Murder and mysterious deaths are plaguing New Jersey. There is talk of the legend of the “Jersey Devil,” but most residents remain convinced it is only a story to frighten children. But as 1905 becomes 1906 and the strange events continue, more questions are raised as to the validity of the curse.

 

Joyce Carol Oates is a literary writer with a tremendous love for language, so The Accursed is not a quick read. The plot often meanders and you discover much about the characters living in the area. Many of the historical figures are not looked upon kindly and readers will see an unfavorable side to many of them. Oates creates a sinister atmospheric tone that runs through the novel, and her very detailed text offers footnotes as the narrator/historian weaves the tale. The use of diary entries and letters help to round out the novel and make it a very thoughtful read. 

 

Doug

 
 

Ghost Story

Ghost Story

posted by:
May 17, 2013 - 6:01am

The Frozen ShroudThere is said to be a ghostly woman roaming the grounds of Ravenbank Hall in the Lake District of England on Halloween night. Just before the First World War, a woman was murdered; her face bashed in and then covered with a shroud that had frozen to the remains.Thus begins the tale of The Frozen Shroud, by Martin Edwards, a mystery featuring crime historian Daniel Kind.

 

Years pass since the death of Gertrude Smith, but the story remained of an impassioned love affair and a jealous wife that took her own life after murdering the young woman.  In the present day, Ravenbank Hall has a new mistress, an Australian woman who managed to snag and marry the Hall’s elderly and infirm owner. Unfortunately for her, she winds up dead in the same fashion as poor Gertrude. Five years go by, and Daniel Kind is invited to a Halloween party near Ravenbank Hall, faced with many unanswered questions. Both crime cases seemed to be tied up too easily. The more recent murder may have been solved incorrectly. Will Daniel be able to find the solution before the killer strikes again?

 

The Frozen Shroud will appeal to a wide variety of readers. The chilling atmosphere of a sinister murder set on Halloween will give many readers chills. Written as an intriguing “whodunit”, this novel will please traditional mystery fans. The characters of Daniel Kind and Detective Chief Inspector Hannah Scarlett are also well defined and interesting, so readers who enjoy a strong protagonist will get caught up learning more about the detectives on the case. This novel is the sixth in Edwards’ Lake District mystery series.

Doug

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Dem Bones

Dem Bones

posted by:
May 6, 2013 - 7:15am

The Crypt ThiefTake one American working as the head of security at the Paris embassy, add one psychologically disturbed killer suffering from a traumatic past life and throw in a murder in the historic Père Lachaise cemetery, close to the final resting spot of Jim Morrison, and you will find yourself in the middle of The Crypt Thief by Mark Pryor, a cracking good thriller featuring Hugo Marston. Hugo is an accomplished profiler, so when an American tourist is shot while apparently sightseeing in the cemetery, he is immediately notified. The victim turns out to be the son of a United States senator. When the woman he was with is identified as a Pakistani traveling on a false passport, red flags are raised and the embassy begins to fear the work of terrorists. Hugo is not convinced. The crime itself does not strike him as being the work of a professional assassin. The type of weapon, the location of the wounds on the body, and the apparent removal of a tattoo on the woman’s arm all point to someone with a more personal interest in the victims. The senator doesn’t hold with this theory  and wants to not only release information to the press that may cause a city wide panic, but also begin a manhunt for the female victim’s traveling companion who may have links to terrorist groups. Hugo must work quickly to solve the crime before all hell breaks loose.

 

The Crypt Thief is the second in the Hugo Marston series that started with The Bookseller. Pryor creates an interesting thriller featuring a demented killer with added elements of investigation that will appeal to mystery lovers. He also includes interesting tidbits about the city of Paris, so readers who appreciate good detail about the locale will find plenty to enjoy.

 

Doug

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Taken by the Flood

Taken by the Flood

posted by:
April 29, 2013 - 7:15am

Evidence of LifeHow do you finally let go when you lose what matters most? This is the question asked by Barbara Taylor Sissel in her new novel Evidence of Life. When Abby’s husband Nick decides to take their daughter on a camping trip, Abby is thrilled that he wants to spend more time with his daughter. After they leave, the skies darken and the weather takes a turn for the worse. Roads are blocked with debris, major flooding ensues and emergency services warn travelers to stay off the roads. Abby receives a disturbing phone call from her daughter Lindsey, who tells her in a scared and distressed voice that they have traveled through San Antonio, Texas, a city far from their intended route. This is the last that Abby would hear from Nick or Lindsey.

 

Everyone is quickly presuming that Nick and Lindsey are dead, even though their bodies have not been recovered. Abby wants to give up the search and begin the grieving process, but there are too many unanswered questions. Her son Jake becomes distant, making fewer trips home from his college. Abby’s best friend Kate, though sympathetic, also seems to know more than she is telling. Nick was a lawyer on a high profile case and some suspect him of absconding with a great deal of money. Could Nick and Lindsey still be alive? Abby’s friends and family are skeptical and urge her to declare them dead and plan a memorial service, but Abby chooses a different path. She will keep searching until she uncovers the truth.

 

Evidence of Life is a suspenseful mystery with many twists and turns. Barbara Taylor Sissel creates an engaging main character in Abby, whose inquisitive nature pulls the reader through the story as we discover the truth along with her. Fans of Mary Higgins Clark will definitely find something to like in this novel.

 

Doug

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Lights Out

Lights Out

posted by:
April 5, 2013 - 6:01am

Last DaysIn Last Days by Adam Nevill, we are introduced to the Temple of the Last Days, a severe apocalyptic cult started in England and led by the enigmatic Sister Katherine. She began as a visionary, but soon detached herself to the life as a recluse, surrounding herself with her favorite acolytes and treating the remaining cult members with reproach and disgust. The cult traveled from England to a farmhouse in France, and eventually ended up in Arizona where Sister Katherine wound up beheaded and several members committed suicide.

  

Years have passed but interest and speculation about the cult never ended. Enter Max Solomon, CEO of Revelation Productions and general new age guru, who wants to make a documentary on the Temple of the Last Days.  He enlists a young filmmaker named Kyle who is well known in the indie film business for making gritty, realistic films on paranormal topics.  Kyle, heavy in debt, agrees.  Max sets up filming locations and connects him with members of the cult who were lucky enough to escape its clutches before it landed in Arizona.  Kyle soon realizes that these living remains of the cult are broken souls, and reliving past days will not be easy for them. During filming, strange things begin to happen, from unexplained footsteps on the floor above to unexplained noises coming from basements below.  There is talk of presences, but no one can explain what or who these presences might be.  Kyle is skeptical until he begins to see shapes in the darkness, shapes carved into the very walls themselves. And then the former members begin to die.

 

Last Days is a gripping read, well detailed and full of interesting characters. The book creates an eerie atmosphere that will have the reader looking over their shoulder while making sure the lights are on.  Fans of Stephen King and Dean Koontz will enjoy this new voice in contemporary horror.

Doug

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