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Doug Beatty

Douglas Beatty grew up reading Agatha Christie, cheering for the Uncanny X-men and watching too many old black and white monster movies. This only strengthened his love for mysteries, graphic novels and horror books and keeps him ready for an impending zombie uprising. He also loves to cook, perform improvisational comedy and listen to pop music. He currently works in Mobile Library Services where he is always poised and ready to hand out another good book.

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In the News




London Underground

posted by: October 8, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover for Deep ShelterOliver Harris’ ne’er do well detective Nick Belsey is in trouble again in the novel Deep Shelter. A random encounter with a speeding perpetrator leads Nick to an abandoned bomb shelter. Finding some crates of champagne as well as some heavy duty medically prescribed drugs, Nick thinks this might be the perfect party spot to take a female companion. When he does just this, the lights are extinguished and Nick’s date is kidnapped, apparently dragged away into a warren of tunnels that could go anywhere. Nick soon finds himself in the uncomfortable position of prime suspect and quite possibly in the middle of an extensive government cover-up that leads back as far as the Cold War. With little help and almost no resources, Nick races against the clock to try and recover the woman he lost.


Nick Belsey was introduced in Harris’ previous novel, Hollow Man. He is a likable character and a good investigator, albeit one that makes very bad decisions. Harris handles the element of suspense well, and Deep Shelter starts quickly and moves at a fast pace. The setting is also amazing and Nick travels from the busy streets of London to mysterious locations deep underground, hoping to find a discarded clue that might lead him in the right direction. The writing is solid; Harris has degrees in creative writing as well as English and Shakespeare studies, so readers who enjoy good descriptions and a sharp writing style will not be disappointed. Readers who enjoy this novel may want to try Stuart MacBride or Mark Billingham.


Anger Management

posted by: September 11, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for BarracudaDaniel Kelly needs to be the fastest, the strongest and the best. The other members of his swim team call him Barracuda, also the title of Christos Tsiolkas’ new novel. Daniel’s goal is to swim freestyle in the Olympic Games. He is half-Greek and half-Australian and comes from modest roots, but his mother insists he attend an exclusive school where he can be coached by a gifted trainer. Daniel quickly realizes he does not fit in at his new posh school. The boys that come from money are quick to tease. He shields himself from the insults and uses the anger to push through the water even faster. His ever-present drive to succeed deafens him to the instructions of his coach, and Daniel soon finds that his dream of Olympic gold leads to nothing. Consumed by hatred for himself and his modest beginnings, Daniel lashes out, and this incident will have repercussions that will haunt him for the rest of his life.

Like Daniel, Christos Tsiolkas grew up in Australia, the son of Greek immigrant parents. His previous novels have won awards in the South Pacific region, including his previous novel The Slap that won the Commonwealth Writers’ Prize. He shows skill again with Barracuda, a detailed literary masterpiece that only an accomplished writer can deliver. Daniel Kelly is a deeply flawed protagonist, struggling with life and trying to find his place in the world. It is a novel of incredible loss, but also of hope and ultimately redemption. Kelly’s story will resonate with the reader long after reading the final pages. This beautifully written novel should be savored by many a reader and would make a perfect title to discuss with a book group.


Three Women

posted by: September 8, 2014 - 7:55am

Cover art for Big Little LiesA school trivia night for parents goes horribly awry in Liane Moriarty’s new novel Big Little Lies. It was meant to be a bit of fun: parents dressed like celebrities, cocktails and trivia. By the end of the night, someone was dead. The answer lies hidden in secrets – both big and small – that some of the women are keeping.


When single mother Jane moves to town, she finds a sunny apartment near the beach. Her son starts kindergarten in a new school, but a pleasant first day quickly turns to accusations of bullying, and Jane and her son make their first enemy.  


Madeline’s daughter is also in the class, and she befriends Jane due to her strong willingness to defend others. Madeline’s own life is in turmoil. Although she has a new husband, she can’t seem to forgive her ex for abandoning her for a younger model.


Finally, there is the beautiful Celeste, who has no flaws and leads a picture-perfect life. Celeste has two overly zealous twins and more money than she knows what to do with. But Celeste is holding on to a secret more devastating than anyone can imagine.


Moriarty had great success with The Husband’s Secret, and fans of that novel will not be disappointed. The author has a great sense of character and delves into the lives of these three women with aplomb. The reader really gets to know them as well-rounded individuals, and when they begin to struggle, the reader will be invested. The mystery of the trivia night is ever present, and Moriarty builds suspense by slowly revealing information that will lead to the inevitable finale. The audio edition is skillfully narrated by Caroline Lee, who gives voice to the three women and creates an enjoyable listening experience. Big Little Lies is a great novel to prepare readers for the back-to-school season. Let’s just hope your school year goes more smoothly!


Life and Art Go On

posted by: August 21, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Station ElevenA devastating pandemic wipes out the human population in Emily St. John Mandel’s new novel Station Eleven. Kirsten Raymonde was just 8 years old when it happened, but she was one of the lucky ones. Now, she is a member of the Traveling Symphony, a band of artists and musicians that wander from town to town, keeping the works of Shakespeare alive. Her comfort lies in two issues of a gloriously detailed comic book and a glass paperweight that was given to her just before the pandemic began by fellow actor Arthur Leander who died on stage that night while performing King Lear. In a world torn apart by disease, the things that matter most are memories and people.


Station Eleven is a lyrical dystopian novel with compelling and complex characters. The plot transports the reader forward and backward in time, meaning you meet many of the characters at different times in their lives. The central characters connect in ways that become more apparent throughout the course of the novel, and each shines with their own intensity. These connections become more important as the characters face their own mortality and the mortality of those they care about. They hold on to memories of the past, clinging to the world that was as they are forced to face an uncertain future. Although this is dystopian literature, the prose is both graceful and thoughtful and will appeal to a much wider audience. The characters, themes and style would make this a good novel to discuss with book groups.


Love Letter to Poirot

posted by: August 14, 2014 - 7:55am

Cover art for The Monogram MurdersAuthor Sophie Hannah, with full permission from Agatha Christie’s family, has sharpened her little grey cells and put pen to paper to create a brand new mystery featuring Hercule Poirot, one of Agatha Christie’s best-loved sleuths. The Monogram Murders begins in 1920 as Poirot escapes the bustle of the city by enjoying a cup of coffee in a small coffee house. There, he meets the distraught Jennie who is in fear for her life and spinning a tale of murder and justice. Before he can discover the full story, Jennie flees the coffee shop and is nowhere to be found. Three dead bodies are soon discovered in a nearby hotel, each with a cufflink stuffed into its mouth. Poirot senses a connection. Can the little Belgian detective solve the murder and find Jennie before it is too late?


Agatha Christie fans will rejoice that Sophie Hannah is able to continue the adventures of their beloved obsessive detective. Agatha Christie featured Poirot in 33 novels and 50 short stories, including Cards on the Table, where a game of bridge turns deadly, and Death on the Nile, where a honeymoon vacation abruptly comes to a halt. Every one of the stories and novels were filmed by the BBC and feature actor David Suchet. The final films can be seen in Poirot: Series 13, a collection of five films, including Elephants Can Remember and Dead Man’s Folly.


With over four billion novels sold, Agatha Christie has become the best-selling novelist of all time, and it is only natural for fans to want more. Sophie Hannah, already a successful crime writer, tackles the challenge with panache, and captures Poirot’s voice and mannerisms perfectly. The novel has colorful suspects, devious twists and turns, and the introduction of a new young detective named Edward Catchpool who is ready to assist Poirot in his efforts to solve the crime. The Monogram Murders will appeal to anyone familiar with Christie, but will also serve as a good introduction to new readers who can then delve in to the works of the true queen of crime.



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