Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Courney Rollins

Courtney is currently working on her Masters in Library Science through North Carolina Central University’s online program. She leaves books around her house and at work, sometimes reading more than one title at a time. Her greatest love is reading fiction for teens but is always looking for something old, something borrowed, or something new to read too! You can find Courtney working as a librarian at the Rosedale Branch. In her free time, she enjoys scrunching the face of her pug, Rigby and escaping to the beach as often as possible with her friends and family.

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In the News




The Dark Side of the Moon

posted by: October 29, 2013 - 7:00am

The Shade of the MoonA meteor knocked the moon dangerously close to the earth and brought about tsunamis that wiped out whole continents and blocked the sun from reaching the planet, permanently changing everything. Susan Beth Pfeffer concludes her teen dystopian series with the fourth installment The Shade of the Moon. The Life As We Know It series follows the lives of a family and their friends as they grapple with the world they now live in and their struggle to survive as everything and everyone around them perishes.


Jon Evans and his remaining family have found themselves in Sexton, a heavily guarded community known as an “enclave” where the inhabitants are referred to as “Clavers.” His position in the prestigious town is always in jeopardy and his whereabouts are shrouded in suspicion. He, his stepmother Lisa and stepbrother Gabe gained entry to Sexton with passes given to them by another family. Jon takes advantage of the life he leads where he has access to purified air, education, health care and food while others work while exposed to chemicals in the air.


One wrong move can be fatal and no one is safe from the prying eyes of the officials who run Sexton. They will do whatever they need to do in order to maintain the safety and order of their community. The Shade of the Moon examines what the world could be like in the event of such a tragedy and the lengths people will go to save the ones they love.


Trusting a Memory

posted by: October 22, 2013 - 7:00am

Cover art for FracturedIn a world where nothing is what it seems and no one is safe to speak out against a tyrannical government for fear of disappearing forever, Kyla must be careful of the questions she asks and of every move she makes. In Fractured, book two of Teri Terry’s Slated trilogy, teenage Kyla has recovered some of the memories of who she was before she became a “Slated” and had her memory wiped clean of her past. Kyla is desperately looking for clues as to what happened to her friend Ben who disappeared after attempting to remove his “Levo,” a GPS and monitoring device fitted onto the wrists of all “Slateds” to keep tabs on them. Kyla fears that Ben is dead, along with so many others discarded by the “Lorders," those in charge of enforcing the laws of society.

When Kyla reconnects with Nico, a face from her past, she begins to “remember” things. But are they really her memories or imposters? Each step Kyla takes only leads to more questions, more danger and still people are missing. Kyla can’t even be certain if finding out who she was before she was slated will solve her problems or make them worse, but she knows one thing — she at least has to try.

Terry’s second installment to her trilogy is a fast paced read, aimed toward readers who enjoyed dystopian series such as Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games and Susan Beth Pfeffer’s Life As We Knew It.


Water Water Everywhere

posted by: October 16, 2013 - 7:55am

Cover art for Not A Drop To DrinkLibrarian Mindy McGinnis’s debut novel, Not a Drop to Drink, shows us just what it would take to live outside of civilization, doing whatever it takes to survive just one more day. Sixteen-year-old Lynn has spent her life defending her most precious commodity: her freshwater pond. The world’s water supply has run dangerously low, and the remaining population is struggling to make it at any cost. Some are packed into cities with strict rules for living and the ever- present threat of cholera looming. Others, like Lynn and her mother, make their own way, eking out a living in the country.


Their only neighbor, a mysterious older man named Stebbs, is their last link to the way things used to be, when people helped one another during tough times. When Lynn finds herself injured and alone after a violent attack, Stebbs helps her find her purpose and her place in the world. Lynn’s mother always taught her not to trust strangers – shoot first, ask questions later. What Lynn didn’t know was how strangers can become family more precious than the water she has guarded and how family, though bound by blood, can be really nothing more than strangers. Readers of teen dystopian fiction will be sure to find themselves loving Not a Drop to Drink.


Home is Always with You

posted by: October 10, 2013 - 7:00am

A Marker to Measure DriftMemories are powerful entities. Sometimes they are strong enough to send us running from all that we fear and love straight into the unknown. Jacqueline has escaped from her painful past in Liberia by traveling across the shores of Northern Africa and Greece in Alexander Maksik’s second novel, A Marker to Measure Drift. Quiet, introspective and even explosively revealing, Jacqueline’s haunting past slowly unfolds throughout the novel as she tries to find the courage to face her tragic losses one by one. With each revelation that surfaces, we learn more about Jacqueline and how she has come to be a lonely, homeless woman drifting from place to place.

A Marker to Measure Drift examines how life can suddenly change without warning because of the violent actions of others, especially for Jacqueline as she was catapulted from her life of luxury to sleeping in a cave with only a handful of possessions and her memories to keep her company. How do you lose everything and everyone but still find the strength to go forward? How do you trust and open up to someone again? How do you forgive yourself for being alive when your loved ones are not? These are the questions Jacqueline asks herself over and over, until finally, she finds her answers. Readers of Michael Ondaatje, author of The English Patient, and Chris Bohjalian, author of The Sandcastle Girls, will find themselves immersed in Maksik’s evocative storytelling.


Secrets to Keep

posted by: October 3, 2013 - 7:00am

The Truth That's in MeOne day, Judith and her best friend Lottie both go missing. When Lottie is discovered dead several days later and Judith is nowhere to be found, the residents of her puritanical town fear the worst for their beloved girls. Several years later, everything changes when Judith appears on her mother’s doorstep with a terrible secret she has been violently forbidden to share with anyone in All the Truth That’s in Me by Julie Berry. Instead of being greeted with open arms, Judith finds herself shunned by all of those around her, including those she loves the most. In the time she’s been gone, the boy she intended to marry has moved on and found another, her father is dead, her mother and brother have written her off as damaged goods and the townspeople have drawn their own suspicious conclusions as to where Judith may have been all this time.


In her first novel for young adults, children’s book author Julie Berry creates a riveting story of the power that secrets can have over us. Written from Judith’s narrative point of view we see her find her strength even through her own silence. It’s a story of finding your own legs to stand on even in the face of pain, loss and tragedy. Readers who enjoy historical fiction with a hint of mystery and romance will find themselves unable to put this book down!




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