Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Courney Rollins

Courtney is currently working on her Masters in Library Science through North Carolina Central University’s online program. She leaves books around her house and at work, sometimes reading more than one title at a time. Her greatest love is reading fiction for teens but is always looking for something old, something borrowed, or something new to read too! You can find Courtney working as a librarian at the Rosedale Branch. In her free time, she enjoys scrunching the face of her pug, Rigby and escaping to the beach as often as possible with her friends and family.

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Mysteries of the Past and Present

posted by: June 25, 2014 - 7:00am

Invisible CityNew reporter Rebekah Roberts is haunted by the mother who abandoned her to return to her secretive Hasidic family. After a childhood in sunny Florida with her adoring father and stepmother, Roberts moves to New York with dreams of becoming a renowned journalist. In Julia Dahl’s debut novel Invisible City, the world of print media is fading fast. However, Roberts lands a job as a glorified tabloid reporter, sent to the scene of the seediest crimes where she hopes to eke out a living reporting facts that someone else will write. After receiving a call to report to a crime scene, she finds herself immersed in the murder mystery of a Hasidic woman who is from the same community as Roberts’ mother is.


When Roberts meets Jewish detective Saul Katz at the home of the victim, he recognizes her based on her uncanny resemblance to the mother she never knew and she is catapulted into a world shrouded in tradition and secrets. With each new fact she discovers, another question replaces it. Her past motivates her to dig further, which leads her into undeniable danger.


With each new turn of the mystery, Roberts finds herself learning more and more about her mother’s Hasidic world. Roberts watches the body taken away by Jewish “police” instead of the medical examiner. She learns that an autopsy will not be conducted, and the victim buried before evidence can be collected. Clearly a murder, the case might never be solved unless Roberts can expose the truth behind the crime and her own ties to the community.


Unseen Terror

posted by: June 23, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for Bird BoxSometimes, what you cannot see is the most terrifying of all. For five years, the world has been plagued by…something; something that, if seen, causes a person to lose their mind and inflict unspeakable violence upon themselves and those immediately around them. Josh Malerman’s debut novel Bird Box brings horror to a new level. Devoid of blood, guts and things that go bump in the night, Malerman’s tale never reveals the monster. Is it even really a monster? Is it a physical being at all? Or is it the mind of man taken to the extreme? Perhaps the most terrifying of all is the lack of answers and how, at any moment, chaos might erupt.


Malorie and her two young children live in darkness in a boarded up home. They only go outside for water from the well and, when they do, they are always blindfolded. The children, known only as Boy and Girl, have learned since birth how to function without their sight. They wear their blindfolds indoors and practice honing their other senses. Malorie spends hours making noises throughout the house and quizzing Boy and Girl, because she knows that when the time comes, this alone will be their only chance for survival.


Malerman shifts between scenes set in the present to those in the not too distant past. We learn how Malorie came to be in the house with the children, and what happened to the group of survivors who welcomed her in. Bird Box is a terrifying story with mystery around every corner and behind every sound.


Malerman is the lead singer for the band The High Strung, best known for performing the theme song to the Showtime series Shameless.


The Kind of Pretty It Hurt to Look At

posted by: May 29, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for RubyEphram Jennings has spent his life loving Ruby Bell. He’s loved her since the first time he saw her as a wild red haired child who was “the kind of pretty it hurt to look at.” After his beloved mother is committed to a mental institution and his heavy-handed father’s death, Ephram is raised solely by his devout sister, Celia, whom he calls “Mama.” Ruby grows up in the shadow of ancestors accused of witchcraft, with violence swirling around her until she finally packs up and leaves Liberty Township for New York City.


When Ruby returns, the town takes notice. Ruby’s red lipstick, fine clothes and perfume draw the attention of all the wrong kind. Over a decade later, the lipstick and heels gone, Ruby lives like a ghost, walking through the town in rags and caked in dirt. No one speaks to her, no one sees her. No one except Ephram. Under the filth, Ephram still sees Ruby for who she really is and longs for her fiercely. Having spent the whole of his life under the thumb of his Mama Celia and the discerning eye of the town and church, Ephram lacks the courage to speak his mind. He suffers from crippling headaches and finds himself vulnerable to the manipulation of others. The day comes when Ephram decides enough is enough and sets out to save Ruby Bell from the town and herself. He is unprepared for the reality of who Ruby has become and what she has succumbed to in her isolation.


In Ruby, a novel rife with heartache, tragedy, love and a touch of mystery, author Cynthia Bond weaves a story so thick and heavy it could pass for the southern grits served at the church picnics in Liberty Township. The story of Ephram and Ruby reverberates with the enduring power of love and explores the depths of the soul through Bond’s powerful words. Readers of Toni Morrison will appreciate the carefully crafted prose Bond presents.


Family Ties

posted by: March 19, 2014 - 7:00am

The Weight of Blood by Laura McHughA heavily and densely woven debut novel by author Laura McHugh, The Weight of Blood oozes mystery, secrets and pain like a long-festering wound. Told primarily from the perspective of Lila, a young mother burdened by her past, the story is paralleled by Lila’s now 17-year-old daughter Lucy’s story.  Lila disappeared when Lucy was just a baby, and she always wondered what really happened the day her mother was last seen holding a gun and heading toward a cave deep in the Ozark Mountains. When Lucy’s childhood friend, Sheri, disappears and is found dismembered a year later, old secrets and suspicions begin to surface as Lucy works to uncover the truth.


Lucy lives with her father who is often away for days at a time working out of town. Even when he returns home he is still only half there, the other half still consumed by the pain of losing his young wife so many years ago.  Lucy has an intimate support network of pseudo-family members, her mother’s once-best-friend and her daughter, a grandmotherly figure who lives nearby in the woods and her father’s brother Crete who is fiercely protective of Lucy, treating her like his own daughter.


In a small town, where heritage is held to the highest of standards and outsiders are always kept at arm’s length, there are no limits to what someone will do for the sake of family. The events that unravel through Lila’s and later into Lucy’s stories attest to the lengths one will go for family.



Secret Lives, Secret Wives

posted by: February 20, 2014 - 7:00am

A Circle of WivesAlice LaPlante’s latest novel, A Circle of Wives, tells a story of lies, secrets and determination from the perspective of several different women. When Dr. Paul Taylor is discovered dead in his hotel room from an apparent heart attack, everything changes as it becomes clear his death was anything but natural.  Married to his wife Deborah for 35 years, Dr. Taylor was a kind-hearted and renowned plastic surgeon who specialized in facial reconstruction for children with birth and medical defects. But his death opens a veritable Pandora’s Box of polygamy and deception when it's revealed that Dr. Taylor had not one, but three wives throughout the state of California.


Detective Samantha Adams is 28 and assigned to her first murder case. She becomes embroiled in the lives of Dr. Taylor’s wives and, while the motive to kill is clear, the question remains as to which wife it could be. They are very different women: the society wife, the hippy accountant and the successful doctor. Two were unaware of their deceased husband’s lies and his “real” wife emerges as the puppet master behind the whole arrangement. Could this make her the most likely suspect?


While LaPlante’s novel initially seems to be a clear cut murder mystery, it quickly evolves into an entirely different story full of psychological suspense, obsession and passion.


After Life

posted by: December 3, 2013 - 6:00am

In the AfterImagine one day you are at home watching TV and the world just… collapses. You don’t know what has happened to anyone you know, you can’t get your parents or anyone on the phone. At one point, you even go through the phone book calling every number you can, hoping someone answers—they don’t. You hear shooting and screaming in the streets until eventually you hear nothing. Good thing your mom was a paranoid government official and surrounded your house with a huge electric fence that keeps out whatever it is that is out there. Good thing your dad was an environmental enthusiast who installed solar panels and a vegetable garden on your roof so you have power and a food source once the world goes dark. In Demitria Lunetta’s debut novel, In the After, 16-year-old Amy finds herself in this very situation.


Amy learns how to survive in her fortified home by eating the vegetables her father grew and rationing the remaining food in her fridge and pantry. She learns that whatever is prowling the streets retreats once the sun goes down and that as long as she remains completely quiet, she is safe. Eventually when her food begins to run out, she must venture out to scavenge. She walks to the nearby stores in her socks to stay as quiet as possible. One day she makes an unexpected and life-altering discovery, a baby girl sitting on the floor of the supermarket.


Amy’s world has changed and she doesn’t know why. When her home becomes threatened, she and the girl she named “Baby” embark on an escape that leads them only to more questions and less answers. Lunetta’s first novel, the first in a series, will appeal to readers of science fiction and dystopian worlds.


A Forgotten Town

posted by: November 8, 2013 - 6:00am

BelowTwelve years ago on the day she was born, Cassie Romano’s town was flooded to make way for a new dam and the residents of Old Lower Grange were moved uphill to a brand new town, New Lower Grange.  The whole town turned out to celebrate the flooding except for Cassie’s family. They were busy racing to the hospital to deliver Cassie eight weeks earlier than planned. In Meg McKinlay’s children’s novel, Below, Cassie is envious of her family’s memories of a place she will never know and she grows up imagining a mysterious town underneath the still waters of the manmade lake. Fascinated with the past, she has spent hours studying old pictures, maps and historic documents and knows where every oak tree stood and where every road leads.


When a summertime drought causes the water levels in the lake to recede dramatically, Cassie and her friend Liam stumble on a long kept secret, a secret that was submerged under 200 of water. Despite their own physical limitations, they work together to solve the mystery below the water.

Below is based on the author’s own experience as a teenager standing next to a drowned town and wondering what remained underneath the water and the mud.


Trapped into a Marriage

posted by: November 1, 2013 - 7:00am

How to Be a Good WifeMarta has stopped taking her pills. After years of following a routine the way her husband and mother-in-law expect her to, she wants to do something differently and see what happens. She desperately misses her adult son who recently announced his engagement and fears losing him forever. Emma Chapman’s debut novel, How to Be a Good Wife, sends readers down a path of uncertainty where every move Marta makes leads to more questions and even less answers. When her husband dispenses her medication to her, she hides them underneath her tongue, then sneaks them into a grate in the floor. Her days become strange as she frequently finds herself in rooms she doesn’t remember entering, feeling as if she has lost pockets of time and seeing a young, dirty, blonde girl named Elise who seems very, very real.  When it appears as if Marta has attempted to abduct a little girl in broad daylight, her family has her committed to a psychiatric facility.


Chapman’s story is unnerving and readers are just as in the dark as Marta. As tiny sprinkles of light begin to open up the secrets of her hazy past, the possible truth of how she came to be Mrs. Marta Bjornstad is shockingly incomprehensible.



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