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Beth

Beth has a weakness for love stories. She reads a wide variety of genres, but her favorites are Romance, Fiction, and Chick Lit. Her first literary loves were Nat from The Witch of Blackbird Pond and Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre. She works in the Collection Development department. In her spare time, she enjoys baking and reading gossip magazines.

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Between the Covers with M.D. Waters

Cover art for PrototypeEarlier this year, Between the Covers blogger Jeanne told our readers about Archetype, a debut novel by Maryland author M.D. Waters. In that novel, Emma wakes with no memory of her past. She begins to have flashes of memory and soon realizes that neither her doctor nor her loving husband Declan are exactly who they seem to be. She fights to learn the truth, and what she finds is truly shocking.

 

Prototype is the exciting conclusion to Emma’s story. The novel picks up one year after the end of Archetype. Emma now knows what happened to her, and she finds herself on the run from Declan. If she wants to survive, she must trust Noah, the man who she used to believe was the love of her life, and members of a resistance group that she used to help lead. The action ramps up in Prototype as Emma claims her true identity. This book is a genre-bending hybrid of science fiction, romance, action and psychological suspense.

 

Waters recently answered some questions for Between the Covers readers. Learn more about this talented writer, what she’s working on now and the music that influenced Emma’s story.

 

Between the Covers: What inspired you to write Emma’s story?
M.D. Waters: Growing up, my dad was a huge influence on me when it came to what the future could hold. I always had these things in the back of my mind: a planet-wide overpopulation, technology to control what type of child you bring into the world and that Mother Nature will always make it right. So when Emma woke me in the middle of the night, telling me she lived in a world where women were a rare commodity… Well, I immediately thought of all these things my dad believed possible.

 

BTC: Equality and legal rights, which differ wildly between men and women as well as clones and humans, are an important issue in both books. Have you had much feedback from readers about those issues?
MW: I have, yes, and everyone takes away very different things. Lots of positive thought provoking, but also some negatives, which surprises me. Lots of assumptions on my “plan,” which doesn’t exist. I see those issues as very normal and very possible, and didn’t even think about the actual rights issues it addressed when I wrote the books. We already live in a world where equality is a matter of perspective, and many of us are blind to the truth. Will it always be that way? I don’t know. I’d love to think we’re progressing to complete equality, but we’re human and subject to nature and/or nurture.

 

BTC: You share a lot of music on your blog. If Emma had a theme song, what would it be?
MW: “Lost in Paradise” by Evanescence. I swear there was a point when I listened to it on repeat for days. But I’d also choose “Tear the World Down” by We Are the Fallen. I felt a lot of Emma’s strength in Prototype in that one.

 

BTC: The books are a great blend of action, science fiction, romance and suspense. Let’s pretend that you just got the call that Archetype and Prototype are being made into a movie, and you have free rein with the casting. Tell us about your dream cast.
MW: Jennifer Lawrence, Stephen Amell (Declan) and Charlie Hunnam (Noah). (Triple crosses fingers!)

 

BTC: Will you tell us a little bit about your writing process? Where do you write? Do you write every day? Who is your first reader?
MW: My process is crazy. I go in these really long spurts of sleeplessness and coffee hazes. Then I binge watch television for days after because I broke my brain. I have a “library” in my house with my books and desktop, but I move around to different areas with my laptop too. Change of scenery always helps. My first readers? Charissa Weaks and Jodi Henry. I have a handful of people who read for me, but these two are always there to read short paragraphs to entire chapters on a whim. I couldn’t do this without them.

 

BTC: What can readers expect from you next?
MW: More of the same. I’m working on a spinoff of Archetype and Prototype, but also a Young Adult sci-fi [novel] that’s set in a world with its own set of issues.

 

BTC: As a reader, what book are you most excited to get your hands on right now?
MW: How much time do we have? Currently, I’m ready to get my hands on The Infinite Sea by Rick Yancey. His writing really shook loose the voice in the Young Adult [novel] I’m working on, plus The 5th Wave was seriously kick-ass. So, um, gimme.

Beth

 
 

Coming Soon to a Theater Near You

The GiverIf I StayAugust is the perfect time to while away a hot, humid Baltimore afternoon in an air-conditioned theater, munching on popcorn and getting lost in a movie. Don’t miss these two new films based on popular novels for teens.

 

Lois Lowry’s Newbery Medal-winning novel The Giver has been a school reading list staple since its publication, and now, it has finally been adapted for the big screen. Jonas is honored to find that he has been selected to be the next Receiver of Memories for his community. Initially, he doesn’t know what that means, but he soon learns that he will become the sole member of his community who knows the world's history and remembers the time before they adopted Sameness. Jonas’ new knowledge forces him to see everything in his world differently, including his family and friends, and he is faced with a difficult choice. The star-studded cast includes Jeff Bridges, Meryl Streep, Katie Holmes, Alexander Skarsgard and Brenton Thwaites. The Giver will be in theaters on August 15.

 

Gayle Forman’s popular novel If I Stay is the story of a young woman who must choose between life and death after her family is in a catastrophic car accident. With both of her parents dead and her brother critically injured, 17-year-old Mia finds herself somewhere between life and death. Over the next day, she looks back on significant moments in her life while the hospital staff fights to save her life and her friends wait to see if she will survive. In the end, Mia must decide what happens next and if she will stay. The movie, starring Chloë Grace Moretz, premieres in theaters on August 22.

Beth

 
 

Walter Dean Myers, 1937-2014

Cover art for MonsterCover art for Fallen AngelsWalter Dean Myers, author of more than 100 books for children and teens, passed away on July 1st at the age of 76. Myers wrote with depth and authenticity. His novels included realistic characters, and he didn’t avoid difficult topics. In his Michael L. Printz Award-winning novel Monster, Myers delves into the world of a 16-year-old boy on trial for murder. His novel Fallen Angels is about a Harlem teen who enlists in the Army and spends a year on active duty on the front lines of the Vietnam War.

 

 

Throughout his distinguished career, Myers earned many prestigious awards for his work including two Newbery Honors, three National Book Award nominations and six Coretta Scott King Awards. He was also awarded the Coretta Scott King-Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement, as well as the Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults. In 2012, Myers was named the Library of Congress National Ambassador for Young People's Literature.

 

 

A lifelong champion of diversity in children’s literature, Myers passionately addressed the issue in an essay in The New York Times, writing, “Books transmit values. They explore our common humanity. What is the message when some children are not represented in those books?” The essay ended simply, “There is work to be done.” That work will be done in his memory as his legacy is carried on through his writing.

Beth

 
 

Best Books of July

Best Books of July

posted by:
July 1, 2014 - 7:00am

Cover art for One Plus OneCover art for The Black HourWhere can you find out about the hottest new books before they’re published? LibraryReads features 10 new titles published each month that have caught the eyes of librarians across the country. The July LibraryReads list is a mix of books by returning favorite authors as well as some fresh debuts. Don’t forget to pack these two in your beach bag this summer!

 

Many American readers were introduced to Jojo Moyes when they read her runaway bestseller Me Before You, which Between the Covers blogger Laura told us about early last year. This summer, Moyes returns with One Plus One. Jess, single mom to a genius daughter and an outcast stepson, needs cash fast, so she embarks on a road trip to the Math Olympiad with her family in tow, hoping to use the prize money to pay her daughter’s tuition. Throw in one large, smelly dog and a disgraced tech geek to round out the party, and you have a charming story about a quirky band of misfits who somehow fit together. Fans of the movie Little Miss Sunshine will love this novel.  

 

Told in alternating chapters, Lori Rader-Day’s The Black Hour brings together the stories of Amelia Emmet, a sociology professor recovering from a seemingly random shooting that left her injured and a student dead 10 months earlier, and Nathaniel Barber, her teaching assistant who wants to write his dissertation about the attack. Rader-Day masterfully builds tension as both Amelia and Nath seek answers about why the shooting happened. This darkly suspenseful debut is a perfect match for readers who enjoy novels by Gillian Flynn and S. J. Watson.

Beth

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Books to Keep You Up All Night

Books to Keep You Up All Night

posted by:
June 30, 2014 - 6:00am

The GoldfinchThe Collector of Dying BreathsThe Lincoln MythWe asked some popular thriller authors what books kept them up all night. Their responses include a host of reading suggestions that will help you build the perfect summer reading list.

 

Chris Pavone, author of The Accident, recommends Donna Tartt’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel The Goldfinch. He writes, “I couldn't put down Donna Tartt's The Goldfinch, which I suspect no one is referring to as a thriller, despite its tremendously thrilling elements. I think it's a great book in every way, but in particular I found it heartbreakingly beautiful on the sentence level–one wonderful sentence after another after another, for nearly 800 pages–and filled with moments of truth and insight. Then, of course, there's the terrorist bombing and the stolen priceless painting and drug deals and death by gunshot and hiding out in an Amsterdam hotel. How can you go to sleep with this type of stuff going on?”

 

Brad Meltzer couldn’t put down Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief, which he says is “[m]ore history, less thriller, but had me to my soul.” The novel, which has been a favorite of readers since its publication in 2006, was also recently made into a movie.

 

M. J. Rose, co-president of International Thriller Writers and author of The Collector of Dying Breaths, shared two of her favorite authors. “Two authors guaranteed to keep me up all night are Lee Child and Steve Berry – they both have new books coming out soon [that are] sure to be as un-put-downable as the last.” Find Child’s Personal: A Jack Reacher Novel (available to be placed on hold) and Berry’s The Lincoln Myth in BCPL's catalog. Rose continues, “Both of them are consummate professionals who never miss a chance to stop a chapter with a cliffhanger and get their characters into what seem like impossible situations. These guys can write!”

 

Matthew Quirk, whose new novel The Directive was just published, recommends a classic. “I recently re-read Marathon Man by William Goldman and couldn't put it down. It has a great voice and unforgettable scenes (you'll never look at a dentist the same way again). It taught me so much about what drives a thriller: relentless threats to your protagonist as you ratchet up the stakes.”

Beth

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The Litchfield Ladies’ Book Club

Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Woman's PrisonOrange Is the New Black Season OneOrange Is the New Black is back! The second season of the popular series starring Taylor Schilling, Jason Biggs and Laura Prepon was released a few weeks ago exclusively on Netflix. The first season’s dramatic ending left fans on the edge of their seats, and the second season brings us right back to the drama at the fictional Litchfield Correctional Facility.

 

The show is based on Piper Kerman’s bestselling 2010 memoir Orange Is the New Black: My Year in a Woman’s Prison. When Kerman was sentenced to 15 months in a minimum security federal prison for a crime that she committed 10 years earlier, she entered a world unlike anything she had ever known. Kerman’s memoir takes readers through her entire sentence as she learns to navigate this world with its unique set of rules and social norms. The book is about more than just Kerman’s experiences, though. The reader gets an up-close view of the American correctional system, and we are introduced to her fellow inmates, whose lives and circumstances are very different from her own. Kerman’s memoir is heartbreaking, uproariously funny and sometimes shocking.

 

Reading is a popular way for the Litchfield inmates to pass the time. A lot of scenes take place in the prison library, and the characters are frequently spotted reading or holding books. The books in the background have taken on a life of their own, becoming a popular topic for fan discussions and blogs. Entertainment Weekly’s Stephan Lee breaks down what the characters are reading in the new season episode by episode. (Contains spoilers.) Popular novels like John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars and Ian McEwan’s Atonement are featured alongside classics like Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina and Virginia Woolf’s Orlando. If you want to read along with the ladies of Litchfield, this list will help you get started.

Beth

 
 

Seven Stories That Will Make You Cry in Public

Cover art for The Book ThiefCover art for AtonementCover art for Bridge to TerabithiaIt has happened to most of us at some point. You’re reading a book on a plane or on the beach. Suddenly, there is a heartbreaking plot twist or a beloved character dies. You try to fight it, but it’s a lost cause. You’re crying in public, and it’s not pretty. These sad stories highlight the deep emotional power that books have over us.

 

•    Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls is one of the first books that made many of us cry. This novel about the friendship between a boy and his two hunting dogs is a modern classic.

 

•    Narrated by Death, Markus Zusak’s The Book Thief is an unforgettable story about a girl named Liesel living in Nazi Germany. The novel was recently adapted into a movie, but this is a book that you simply must read.

 

•    Me Before You by Jojo Moyes follows Louisa Clark, a young woman who takes on a job as a caretaker for Will Traynor, who is a quadriplegic. The two of them quickly grow close, but Will’s plans for his assisted suicide loom ahead of them in this tragic, romantic tale.

 

•    Ian McEwan’s Atonement is an elegant exploration of guilt and forgiveness. During the summer of 1935, 13-year-old Briony accuses the family maid’s son Robbie of sexually assaulting her cousin. The consequences of her testimony haunt her for the rest of her life.

 

•    Katherine Paterson’s Bridge to Terabithia is a beloved childhood favorite for many readers. Despite their differences, Jess and Leslie become inseparable friends. When tragedy strikes, Jess must use the lessons that their friendship taught him to heal.

 

•    Set in a postapocalyptic America, Cormac McCarthy’s The Road is the story of a father and son who walk through the desolation, depending only on each other while they try to make their way to the coast.

 

•    Gail Caldwell’s Let's Take the Long Way Home: A Memoir of Friendship will make you want to call your best friend. In this poignant memoir, Caldwell chronicles her friendship with her best friend Caroline Knapp from their first meeting through Knapp’s death of lung cancer at age 42.

Beth

 
 

Between the Covers with Jennifer Weiner

All Fall DownJennifer WeinerWith over 4.5 million copies of her books in print, Jennifer Weiner’s career is at an all-time high. Her new novel All Fall Down will almost certainly be on bestsellers lists this summer. The story follows Allison Weiss, a hardworking wife and mom who seems to have it all. In reality, she is crumbling under the pressure of her stressful life and has become addicted to prescription painkillers. With her trademark wit and relatable style, Weiner takes the reader through Allison’s downward spiral into addiction and then in her journey to recovery.

 

Weiner recently answered some questions for our Between the Covers readers. Read on to learn more about what inspired her new novel and where she writes. (Hint: It’s Carrie Bradshaw-inspired!) She also shares her picks for your summer reading list.

 

What inspired you to write this story?

 

When I turned 40 – lo these many years ago – I started thinking a lot about happiness. I think it’s in everyone’s nature – certainly it’s in mine – to set goals, and to think, When this happens, I’ll feel happy, or, as soon as I’ve achieved this, I’ll never be sad again. Writers, in particular, fall prey to this kind of thinking: When I get a book published, I’ll be happy and I won’t care if it gets a million bad reviews, or, if my book’s a best-seller, I’ll never let anything bother me again.

 

Of course, life doesn’t work out that way. No matter what you achieve, there’s always someone who’s done more, or done it faster, and no achievement guarantees perfect peace of mind. So the question becomes: What does happiness look like? How can people find it? What if it’s not what we’ve always believed?

 

I wanted to write about a character who’d hit all the mile markers, whose life looked like it should have been perfect, and to have that life not feel perfect to her. Allison’s got the handsome husband, the beautiful child, the big house, an interesting job that she likes…but none of it has silenced that voice inside of her, a voice I think so many women have, asking, Is that all? Is this it? And if it is, why do I feel so empty?

 

All Fall Down really highlights the fact that addiction impacts people of all ages and walks of life. Will you tell us a little bit about the research that you did while writing this book?

 

I spent time at several different facilities, I read a lot of books and blogs, I talked to lots of people…and then I spent a lot of time inside my own head, thinking about Allison. One of the things I heard from a counselor that really stayed with me was that addicts don’t have a problem with substances; they have a problem with feelings. They never learned how to handle sadness, or anger, or frustration, or disappointment, and the drugs or the alcohol are a symptom, not the disease itself.

 

Allison is a very relatable character. She’s a busy wife and mother who is struggling to keep the pieces of her life together. Do you see any of yourself in her?

 

Of course there’s some of me in all of my characters, even though my specifics aren’t exactly like Allison’s. I wanted to make her like me, but I wanted to make her like any mom you’d meet at Little Gym, or in the preschool parking lot. She’s funny, she’s stressed, she’s interesting, she’s overextended…she’s all of us.

 

Will you share a little bit about your writing process? Where do you write? Do you write every day?

 

I’m lucky not to be one of those writers who hate writing – I actually really enjoy it, and have ever since I learned how! I write pretty much every day, although sometimes I’ll skip the weekends if I’m busy with my kids. I do most of my writing in my closet, which sounds pathetic until I explain that I basically have Carrie Bradshaw’s Sex and the City closet. Alas, I do not have Carrie’s wardrobe. Possibly because I do not have Carrie’s figure, and a lot of those designers of dresses she wore around Manhattan do not serve my kind.

 

So I have this gigantic closet which has turned into an office-library-storage space, with my daughters’ artwork hanging on the walls, and my big girl’s old clothes in boxes waiting for my little one to grow into them, and there’s a desk with a big light-up mirror. If Carrie lived in my house the vanity would be her makeup station, but that’s where I do my work.

 

Throughout your career, you have maintained a strong online presence on your blog and social media, and that has really allowed you to connect with your readers. How has that impacted your writing?

 

Again, I’m a lucky writer because I enjoy being online. I don’t regard it as a penance or a punishment. I like being quick and quippy on Twitter [follow her @jenniferweiner], I love interacting with readers on social media, and I love using it to get instant feedback – about a character’s name, about a book cover, about what my kids are up to. My suspicion is that readers like feeling that there’s a connection with an author they like.

 

What is the best book you’ve read recently? Are there any authors on your personal must-read list?

 

I loved Roxane Gay’s An Untamed State. It’s about a kidnapping in Haiti, and it’s a very unsettling book, but oh, so good. And I’m counting the days until Lev Grossman’s The Magician’s Land, the third book in his trilogy about young adult hipster magicians that attend a college for magic (his work has been described as Harry Potter for grownups, but I think it has more in common with the Narnia books). Baltimore’s own Anne Tyler and Laura Lippman are both automatic purchases for me – I love both of their styles!

 

Weiner's fans will also be pleased to know that she’s visiting Baltimore soon. She will discuss All Fall Down at Enoch Pratt Free Library’s Central Library on June 18.

Beth

 
 

Between the Covers with Susan Jane Gilman

Susan Jane GilmanThe Ice Cream Queen of Orchard StreetSpanning the 20th century, Susan Jane Gilman’s The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street is a rags-to-riches story about Lillian Dunkle, an indomitable Russian Jewish immigrant who builds an empire and becomes America's “Ice Cream Queen.” The story is narrated by Lillian, whose sharp wit and acerbic sense of humor are a stark contrast to her public image as kindly grandmother. Her personality is the heart of this character-driven story about the pursuit of the American dream.

 

Gilman recently answered some questions about her novel for Between the Covers readers. Grab a double scoop of your favorite ice cream, and read on to get to know Gilman and what inspired this fascinating new novel.

 

The ice cream business is an unusual starting point for a novel. What was it about that industry that caught your attention?

 

First of all, I love ice cream. And if you’re going to write a book, it better be about a topic that can sustain your passion and interest for years.

 

I initially got the idea for The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street when a friend and I were reminiscing about a local ice cream chain called Carvel. The owner, Tom Carvel, did his own tv commercials, in which he would rasp, “Please, buy my Carvel ice cream?” They were so hokey and homespun, they were sort of fabulous.

 

Googling “Tom Carvel” on a whim, I learned that he was a Greek immigrant, Tom Carvelas, who arrived in America penniless, only to build an enormous empire of ice cream franchises. Then I discovered that the Mattuses, the founders of Haagen-Daz, were two first-generation Jews who came from the tenements in the Bronx. These ice cream makers’ stories were classic American-immigrant-rags-to-riches sagas. This struck me as a wonderful basis for a novel.

 

You did an enormous amount of research while working on this novel. Did it included any taste-testing? (We hope so!) What is your favorite ice cream flavor?

 

By all means, I did taste-testing! As the founder of the Susan Jane Gilman Institute of Advanced Gelato Studies, why, it was imperative! I even contacted my inspiration – the Carvel Ice Cream Company itself – and arranged to work at a Carvel ice cream franchise out in Massapequa, Long Island. For two days, the owner let me go behind the scenes, learn the ropes and work as an ice cream maker serving customers. I loved every minute of it – except the owner was no dummy. He wouldn’t let me near that soft ice cream machine unsupervised. He must have known that, given the chance, I’d place my head directly beneath the server and just let the ice cream pour directly into my mouth.

 

There is also the Carpigiani Gelato University located just outside of Italy. I live about five hours away, in Geneva, Switzerland, so of course I had to go there as well, tour its Gelato Museum and take a Gelato Masterclass. I learned the science and mathematics behind gelato-making, made my own batch of gelato, and then of course, tasted my own concoction. I was in such heaven, I thought the top of my head would explode.

 

As for my favorite flavor, if there’s no decent mint-chip to be had, I am always happy with chocolate.

 

Lillian is a force to be reckoned with in the novel, and she has a very distinct voice from the first page. Did you have any real life inspiration for this formidable character?

 

I have to say, Lillian’s voice came to me in the proverbial flash. As I sat down to write the beginning, I heard her speaking, and that was it – I just had her. There are parts of her way of speaking that are reminiscent of my paternal grandmother — particularly her word choices — but the voice was unique to me. I felt as if I channeled it. In terms of her overall character, there’s a dash of Scarlett O’Hara and Leona Helmsley, I suppose, but really, I saw her as far more than simply mean and imperious, or a caricature talking ethnic schtick, or a punchline. I wanted her to be phenomenally complex and contradictory and compelling — the way all of us really are.

 

This is your first novel. What made you want to take on this new challenge? How did the process differ from writing nonfiction?

 

Ever since I was 8 years old, when I fell in love with reading and started to write my own short stories in little notebooks, I dreamed of writing a novel.  I always assumed that one day, I’d become the author of some sort of wonderful, fictional opus. Yet as I grew up, I kept getting sidetracked. Although I got an MFA in Creative Writing and published short stories and even won literary prizes, things in our culture kept pissing me off so much that I felt compelled to respond with books. Kiss My Tiara was in reaction to a dating guide that urged women to trick men into marrying them. Hypocrite in a Pouffy White Dress was conceived as a smart, funny counter-point to women’s memoirs that focused on either miserable childhoods, or being single and going shopping. Undress Me in the Temple of Heaven, the true story of a disastrous trip to China, was an antidote to several popular books in which women got over divorces by going to ashrams or renovating villas in Tuscany. I suppose I had to get three nonfiction books off my chest before I could finally get around to writing that novel.

 

I never expected to be a nonfiction author at all. It was an accident!  The Ice Cream Queen of Orchard Street may seem like a new direction, but it doesn’t feel like one to me at all. Finally, I’ve returned to my first love, to what I intended to do all along.

 

What is the best book you have read recently?

 

Let me give you three completely different ones: I loved Adam Johnson’s novel The Orphan Master’s Son; it was epic, disturbing, rich and unlike anything I’ve ever read, particularly given its setting. On a recent vacation, I read Maria Semple’s Where’d You Go, Bernadette; the first half made me laugh out loud from its smart, wicked wit. I was also profoundly moved by The Bosnia List, a new memoir co-written by Kenan Trebincevic and my friend Susan Shapiro. The story blew me away, and really enhanced my understanding of the Balkan conflict in an intimate way. I want everything when I read: humor, pain, transcendence, pleasure, education, enlightenment. Always, I want them to be intelligent. But I can never pick one favorite.

Beth

 
 

Three Sizzling Thrillers for Summer

Cover art for FaceoffCover art for That NightCover art for The Truth About the Harry Quebert AffairKick off your summer reading with one of these hot new thrillers! Members of the International Thriller Writers have joined forces to create Faceoff, an exciting new anthology of short fiction with a fun twist. Your favorite characters’ worlds are colliding in this collection of 11 brand new stories written by 23 of the hottest writers in the genre today. These stories pair popular characters like Lee Child’s Jack Reacher with Joseph Finder’s Nick Heller, M.J. Rose’s Malachai Samuels with Lisa Gardner’s D.D. Warren and Jeffery Deaver’s Lincoln Rhyme with John Sandford’s Lucas Davenport. Baldacci says, “This is a once-in-a lifetime opportunity for readers. It’s only through ITW that we were able to bring these literary legends toe to toe.” Faceoff should be at the top of your must-read list this summer.  

 

Chevy Stevens has won over many readers with her three previous thrillers, but with her new novel That Night, she is poised to be a breakout star. Toni spent 15 years in prison after being wrongly convicted of her younger sister Nicole’s murder. Now, she is on parole and back home on Vancouver Island. Toni is determined to rebuild her life, which includes avoiding contact with Ryan, who was convicted for the same crime and is determined to prove their innocence. Toni knows that in order to move forward, she must eventually uncover what happened on that long-ago summer night. Skillfully moving between past and present, Stevens reveals the shocking truth about Nicole’s death in this riveting novel.

 

Already a bestseller in France, Italy, Spain, Switzerland and the Netherlands, Joel Dicker’s The Truth about the Harry Quebert Affair will be published in the U.S. this summer.  When he is faced with writer’s block while writing his second novel, Marcus Goldman visits his mentor Harry Quebert in Somerset, New Hampshire. During Marcus’s visit, the remains of Nola Kellergan, the 15-year-old with whom Harry had an affair before she disappeared in August 1975, are found on Harry’s property, and Harry is the chief suspect in her murder. Marcus decides to exonerate Harry and write a book about it. The pages fly by as the reader is drawn deeper and deeper into this book within a book. With a colorful cast of characters, Dicker’s convoluted whodunit deserves a place on your summer reading list.

Beth

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