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Beth

Beth has a weakness for love stories. She reads a wide variety of genres, but her favorites are Romance, Fiction, and Chick Lit. Her first literary loves were Nat from The Witch of Blackbird Pond and Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre. She works in the Collection Development department. In her spare time, she enjoys baking and reading gossip magazines.

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Bloggers

 

Catch the Ripper!

Catch the Ripper!

posted by:
September 25, 2012 - 8:11am

RipperJack the Ripper has long captured the imaginations of readers and writers. Stefan Petrucha’s new teen novel Ripper brings a new twist on the well-known Ripper mythology.

 

Carver Young loves mystery novels and breaking the rules, which recently led him to find a letter from his father. This is the only information that he has about his parents. When the orphanage where he lives is forced to require all children over eight years old to find homes, 14-year-old Carver is adopted by a retired Pinkerton detective. Soon, Carver is being trained as a detective by his eccentric mentor, and his first assignment is to follow the clues to learn about his father. As his investigation progresses, Carver begins to see more and more parallels between his father and a killer who is stalking women in New York City. With Carver, the New Pinkertons, and the New York City Police led by Police Commissioner Theodore Roosevelt on the trail of the killer, two questions emerge: Is Carver really Jack the Ripper’s son? Can he stop the Ripper? 

Gadgets abound, giving this fast-paced novel a hint of steampunk feel. The New Pinkertons’ headquarters is a haven for contraptions that will make the detectives’ work easier. From an analytical engine (a steam-powered computer) to a stun baton and an auto-lock pick, these devices add a quirky element to the story. Petrucha takes liberties with historical details, but he does include notes to help readers distinguish between fact and fiction. Although they are on the trail of Jack the Ripper, the story is low on gore and high on action and suspense. Petrucha has created a non-stop thrill-ride with a killer twist that will leave readers waiting for the sequel, which he is already writing!

Beth

 
 

A Journey through Time

A Journey through Time

posted by:
September 20, 2012 - 8:30am

Shadow of NightShadow of Night, the second book in Deborah Harkness’s All Souls trilogy, was released this summer to the delight of her fans. It continues the story of historian/witch Diana and geneticist/vampire Matthew who met and fell in love in A Discovery of Witches. They go back in time to Elizabethan London to continue their search for the alchemical manuscript Ashmole 782. Upon their arrival, they meet Matthew’s friends from the School of Night, all well-known historical figures like Sir Walter Raleigh and Christopher Marlowe. Their spellbinding journey takes readers to England, France, and Prague. Diana continues her magical education while facing the dangers of being a witch in that time period, and much more is revealed about Matthew’s past and his family.

 

This series has enchanted readers with its blend of magic, history, and romance. Shadow of Night picks up right where the series-starter A Discovery of Witches left off, so readers new to the series will need to start with the first book. The series is flavored by rich historical detail. The author’s passion for history comes as no surprise, though. Harkness is a professor of history at University of Southern California in Los Angeles. Some of the lingering questions from the first book of the series are answered in Shadow of Night, but many more are left to be explained in the final book of the series.

 

Harkness’s knowledge of wine is evident in her novels, especially A Discovery of Witches. Many readers may not realize that in her spare time, she shares her love of wine on her award-winning blog Good Wine Under $20.

Beth

 
 

Downton Abbey’s Competition

Call the MidfieBBC’s new series based on Jennifer Worth’s best-selling memoir Call the Midwife: A Memoir of Birth, Joy, and Hard Times broke viewer records when it attracted 9.8 million viewers for its opening episode. The show’s popularity only grew from there with later episodes overtaking Downton Abbey’s record ratings. The ensemble cast, including Jessica Raine and Vanessa Redgrave, brings to life the harsh living conditions in London’s poorest slums in the 1950s. The memoir that inspired the series was recently rereleased in time for the show’s US television premiere.

 

At age 22, Jennifer Worth moved into an Anglican convent to work as a midwife to the poorest women in East London. The world she describes is almost unimaginable to modern audiences. Few people had cars, so children typically played in the smaller side streets where there was no traffic. Large families lived in small two-room apartments, many of which had cold running water but no indoor bathrooms. Antibiotics were new and rarely used, and nearly all births took place in the patient’s home.

 

Armed with only a bicycle and bag of supplies, Worth and the other midwives from Nonnatus House delivered 80-100 babies per month in their patients’ homes. Although the details of her patients’ lives and their living conditions are sometimes difficult to read, Worth also brings humor and hope to the stories. Told in her unique voice, Call the Midwife is filled with colorful characters from the nuns and midwives to the patients themselves. This frank and sometimes graphic memoir brings to life a fascinating piece of history. Call the Midwife will air in the US on PBS beginning Sunday, September 30th, and will be released on DVD in November. To get a taste of the show, check out this trailer.

Beth

 
 

Free As We’ll Ever Be

Free As We’ll Ever Be

posted by:
September 18, 2012 - 7:55am

Pushing the LimitsDebut author Katie McGarry’s edgy new contemporary novel Pushing the Limits was written for older teens, but it is also attracting the attention of Romance readers.

 

Echo Emerson and Noah Hutchins are high school seniors brought together by Mrs. Collins, the new social worker who has taken on their cases. Each of them is facing serious struggles. During Noah’s freshman year, both of his parents died, and he and his two younger brothers were placed in separate foster homes. He hates the system and is desperate to find a way to bring his family back together. Echo is dealing with the loss of her brother Aires, a Marine killed in Afghanistan. She is also trying to understand another event that rocked her world. During Echo’s sophomore year, something happened while she was visiting her mother. What happened that day left Echo’s arms badly scarred, but she can’t remember anything about it. No one will tell her the whole truth, and a restraining order now prevents her from having contact with her mother. Rumors about what happened to her have made her a social outcast at school. As Echo and Noah fall in love, they both search for the truth and work to repair their own lives.

 

This novel takes on loss, mental illness, and family dynamics. Echo and Noah are both damaged people, but despite their unusual circumstances, they are also both relatable characters. The narration alternates between their points of view, giving each of them a unique voice and perspective. Pushing the Limits marks Katie McGarry as a hot new author to watch.

Beth

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Past is Present

Past is Present

posted by:
September 17, 2012 - 8:45am

The Cutting SeasonAttica Locke’s highly anticipated new novel The Cutting Season is an atmospheric murder mystery that weaves together two stories, skillfully drawing readers between past and present. A gripping story of race, love, and politics, The Cutting Season grabs readers from the first page. Caren Gray’s family has been connected to Belle Vie, an antebellum plantation in Louisiana, for generations. Unlike the neighboring farm where migrant workers harvest sugarcane, Belle Vie is now an historic estate open for tourists and social events. Caren lives on and manages the estate where she catches glimpses of the plantation’s dark history every day. When a murdered woman who worked on the neighboring farm is found in a shallow grave on Belle Vie, local police begin an investigation that Caren feels isn’t being handled properly. She digs deeper, asking questions that lead her to Belle Vie’s past. As she learns more, she starts to see parallels between the current murder and the disappearance of a former slave named Jason in 1872. Caren is unearthing secrets that someone may kill to keep hidden.

 

This novel is the first book in HarperCollins publishing’s new Dennis Lehane Books imprint. Lehane says of Locke’s writing, “I was first struck by Attica Locke's prose, then by the ingenuity of her narrative and finally and most deeply by the depth of her humanity. She writes with equal amounts grace and passion. After just two novels, I'd probably read the phone book if her name was on the spine." If The Cutting Season is any indication of what readers can expect from Lehane’s imprint, it will be very successful.

 

Beth

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Celebrate Roald Dahl Day

The BFGJoin in the celebration of the life and work of Roald Dahl, the renowned author whose books have delighted children and adults alike for over 50 years.

 

Roald Dahl Day takes place on September 13 every year, but this year is even more special because 2012 marks the 30th anniversary of the publication of The BFG. In this novel, an orphan named Sophie is taken from her bed by a giant who takes her to Giant Country. The giant doesn’t want to harm Sophie because, as he explains, he is the world’s only friendly giant. He is the BFG—the Big Friendly Giant. Unlike other giants who eat “human beans,” the BFG collects good dreams to give to children. Sophie and the BFG band together to save humans from the other giants.

 

To learn more about Dahl’s extraordinary life, try Michael Rosen’s new children’s biography Fantastic Mr. Dahl. This book tells the story of how a boy from a Wales grew up to write beloved children’s books like Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, James and the Giant Peach, and Matilda. Rosen, who declares himself Dahl’s biggest fan, tells Dahl’s extraordinary life story with affection and humor.

 

If you would like to celebrate Roald Dahl Day tomorrow, read your favorite Roald Dahl book, or try one of the fun activities here!

Beth

 
 

Hollywood Dreams

Hollywood Dreams

posted by:
September 11, 2012 - 8:30am

The Next Best ThingLike the heroine of her new novel The Next Best Thing, bestselling author Jennifer Weiner thought that it was a dream come true when she was approached to co-create a sitcom featuring a plus-sized heroine trying to break into show business. Although State of Georgia was short-lived, Weiner used her experiences in the television industry to create her new novel.

 

Readers first met Ruth Saunders in the short story “Swim” in Weiner’s The Guy Not Taken: Stories. After losing her parents in an accident that permanently scarred her, Ruth was raised by her grandmother. During her recovery from her injuries, Ruth and her grandmother found comfort in their favorite TV shows, like The Golden Girls. After she finished college, Ruth and her grandmother moved to Hollywood to chase Ruth’s dream of writing television shows. Now, Ruth has worked her way from glorified gofer to the creator of her first TV show, The Next Best Thing, a sitcom based loosely on her own life.

 

Ruth struggles with the process of shooting the pilot and first season of her show. As the show evolves, she watches her heartwarming comedy about an average girl breaking in to the restaurant business with the love and support of her grandmother change into another show entirely. Cady, the famous actress that the network forced Ruth to hire to play the plus-sized heroine, suddenly diets her way to a size 0. Network politics force her to fire actors that she thinks are right for the show, and the character based on her grandmother is rewritten as an oversexed cougar. Is this really the career she has always dreamed of? Weiner’s Hollywood-insider perspective and warm humor make readers cheer for Ruth’s chance to have it all.

 

Weiner is known for connecting with her readers via social media.  Fans can follow her on Twitter (@JenniferWeiner), where she live-tweets reality TV shows like The Bachelor and shares her favorite new books with her readers.

 

Beth

 
 

The Berenstain Penguin

The Berenstain Penguin

posted by:
September 5, 2012 - 8:00am

Nothing Ever Happens at the South PoleStan and Jan Berenstain’s long-lost manuscript Nothing Ever Happens at the South Pole is finally being published, and the behind-the-scenes story of this book may surprise you.

 

After their first book The Big Honey Hunt was published in 1962, Stan and Jan Berenstain were advised by their editor Theodor Seuss Geisel (Dr. Seuss) not to write another book featuring the bears. He told them that writing a series was a terrible idea and that there were simply too many children’s stories about bears already. The Berenstains took his advice and began work on a new book called Nothing Ever Happens at the South Pole. In this story, a penguin receives a blank book and sets out to find adventures to write about in his book. He daydreams about exciting things that could happen as he walks. Through the illustrations, readers see his wish coming true, but the penguin remains oblivious to the action in the background. At the close of his day, readers see the penguin make his first journal entry, “NOTHING HAPPENED HERE TODAY.”

 

By the time the Berenstains finished writing Nothing Ever Happens at the South Pole, word came back from the Random House sales staff that the The Big Honey Hunt was a hit. The Berenstains continued writing their famous Berenstain Bears series, and their second manuscript went into their files, where it remained unpublished ...until now.

Beth

 
 

The Beauty Killer Strikes Again

The Beauty Killer Strikes Again

posted by:
September 4, 2012 - 8:30am

Kill You TwiceKill You Twice, the fifth book in Chelsea Cain’s Gretchen Lowell series, is sure to keep readers up all night. This series of gory, fast-paced thrillers follows Portland detective Archie Sheridan who was kidnapped and tortured for 10 days by Dr. Gretchen Lowell, the Beauty Killer. Gretchen is both terrifyingly violent and undeniably magnetic. Even now, years after the attack, the two of them have a strange bond. No matter how hard Archie tries to stay away from Gretchen, he will never truly escape her influence.

 

In Kill You Twice, Archie is investigating a gruesome murder when he receives two cryptic pieces of information from Gretchen who now is locked away in a state mental institution: Gretchen has a child, and Archie should investigate someone named Ryan Motley. Kill You Twice gives readers a surprising glimpse into Gretchen’s past while pulling them deeper into her latest game of cat and mouse.

 

This riveting suspense series will remind readers of The Silence of the Lambs by Thomas Harris. It isn’t for the faint of heart, but fans of horror and suspense will be drawn into Gretchen’s web. Readers new to the Cain’s thrillers should start with Heartsick, the first novel in the series, which provides insight into how Archie and Gretchen’s dark, twisted relationship developed. 

 

FX recently announced that the network has begun development on a new TV series based on the Gretchen Lowell books. The first season will follow Heartsick. Cain is thrilled with the news. She wrote on her blog, “FX makes some awesome TV. JustifiedAmerican Horror StorySons of Anarchy. These people clearly buy fake blood in bulk and know how to use it.” Will Heartsick be the network’s next big hit?  Cain’s fans certainly hope so.

Beth

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Here's to You, Mrs. Robinson

Mrs. Robinson's DisgraceBefore British Parliament passed the Matrimonial Causes Act, marriages could only be dissolved in a private Act of Parliament, the cost and scandal of which made divorces rare. During the summer of 1858, that changed. The new Court of Divorce and Matrimonial Causes began to grant divorces to the English middle class. On June 14, 1858, a man named Henry Robinson petitioned the court to dissolve his marriage to his wife Isabella on grounds that she had committed adultery. The evidence came from her own diary, portions of which were read aloud over the course of the trial and then widely published in London newspapers. London was riveted by the scandal. Kate Summerscale brings this fascinating story to modern audiences in Mrs. Robinson’s Disgrace: The Private Diary of a Victorian Lady.

 

In her diary, Isabella Robinson regularly reflected on her unhappiness with her life and marriage. She also wrote about a relationship with a man named Edward Lane, who publicly denied the affair. Standards for proving a wife’s adultery in divorce cases were so low that the diary was potentially enough to condemn Isabella in court despite her husband’s multiple infidelities. To protect Lane’s reputation, Isabella’s attorneys and doctors convinced her to present the diaries as fictional, and her only viable legal defense was to claim that she had imagined the affair because she suffered from sexual mania.

 

Summerscale first read about this story in a book about Victorian scandals while she was researching her previous bestseller, The Suspicions of Mr. Whicher: A Shocking Murder and the Undoing of a Great Victorian Detective. She began to investigate the story because she was intrigued by the double standards that women faced in Victorian divorce courts; she wanted to know the truth about Isabella Robinson. Her storytelling results in the gripping tale of Mrs. Robinson’s fall from grace and the ensuing scandal.

Beth