Welcome to the Baltimore County Public Library.

Baltimore County Public Library logo Connecting the Community: Holiday Toy Drive
   
Type of search:   
BCPL on FacebookBCPL on TwitterBCPL on TumblrBCPL on YouTubeBCPL on Flickr

Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Horror

   Humor

   Legal

   Literary

   Magical Realism

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Mythology

   Paranormal

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Thriller

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Dystopian

   Fantasy

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Paranormal

   Realistic

   Romance

   Science Fiction

   Steampunk

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

   Adventure

   Beginning Reader

   Concepts

   Fantasy

   First Chapter Book

   Graphic Novel

   Historical

   Humor

   Media Tie-In

   Mystery

   Picture Book

   Realistic

   Tales

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

In the News

Bloggers

 

Dreamboat Ann - and Nancy

Kicking and DreamingHeart has been around for decades, breaking into the largely male world of rock music earlier than most female performers. In Kicking & Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul, and Rock & Roll, Ann and Nancy Wilson alternately describe their extraordinary lives in the music industry. Picking up stories that the other starts, the format reads smoothly, and indicates the strong ties these sisters have shared all these years. Beginning with the childhoods they experienced as daughters of a major in the Marines, Ann, Nancy, their older sister Lynn and their mother moved constantly, finding it hard to put down roots. Because of this, their family (known as “The Big Five”) focused inwardly. Ann, a classic middle child, dealt with body image and stuttering problems that vanished when she found her voice. Later, Nancy, the youngest, found comfort in relationships with her band mates.

 

The story of the band’s genesis and first big break is vividly recounted, along with the bumps along the way. Their first hit “Magic Man” was released while they were briefly living in Vancouver, and they became stars in Canada before in their native country. This period brought success after classics like “Dog and Butterfly” and “Barracuda” became showstoppers. After some rough times and disappointing album sales in the cocaine-fueled early 80s, Heart’s second-act rebirth came with hits like “What About Love”, “These Dreams” and “Alone”. Included, too, is the interesting story of how Ann, to this day, refuses to sing their controversial 1989 hit “All I Want to Do is Make Love to You”. Full of tidbits about musicians the women have come to know over the years, including Stevie Nicks, Elton John, John Mellencamp, and many in the Seattle rock scene, this is a strong memoir about a life on the road, but also the story of two sisters who broke through a glass ceiling and came out on top.

Todd

 
 

Six Degrees of Celebrity

Hello Goodbye HelloCraig Brown tackles the world of celebrities and their fascinating encounters with one another in Hello Goodbye Hello: a Circle of 101 Remarkable Meetings. Brilliant in conception, with each vignette comprised of exactly 1,001 words, Brown entertains the reader with amusing anecdotes of how the celebrated and gifted interacted. Some of the meetings are unlikely and many are just plain weird.

 

From an opening story in which Adolf Hitler is knocked down by a careless English driver in 1931, to the Duchess of Windsor’s meeting with the Fuhrer over tea, and throughout the ninety-nine tales in between, this book is proof that truth is stranger than fiction. Brown employs a chain-link structure to his narrative so one encounter smoothly leads directly into the next one. Some meet-ups are delightfully pleasant as between mutual admirers Rudyard Kipling and Mark Twain. Less successful encounters include Groucho Marx trying to impress T.S. Eliot by quoting his poetry, and Eliot commenting that he was familiar with his own work and didn’t need a recitation. And a last group of meetings are miserable failures, including one between literary pair James Joyce and Marcel Proust, who barely spoke to one another. Brown, a BBC Radio host and Daily Mail columnist, delivers an absorbing, humorous collection of snapshots in the lives of famed personalities.  For readers unfamiliar with some of the characters at play in this circle, Brown provides brief biographies. His snarky asides and enlightening footnotes add to the stories of these often incongruous, sometimes poignant, but always entertaining meetings.  

Maureen

 
 

Silent Killer

Breathing RoomInvincible MicrobeTuberculosis has been called the greatest serial killer of all time, and remains a crisis in many countries. Two new books for children tackle this scourge and shed light on the incredible pain suffered by its victims and the horrors of treatment.

 

In 1940, thirteen year old Evelyn (“Evvy") Hoffmeister is sent to Loon Lake Sanatorium, a treatment facility for tuberculosis patients in Breathing Room by Marsha Hayles. Evvy is frightened by her new surroundings and must learn to adapt to the harsh rules – no talking, no visitors, strict bed rest. Evvy soon finds her place and makes friends with the other girls in her ward. Hayles provides a fascinating glimpse into the medical technology of the day, such as the pneumothorax which blew air into the chest, or thoracoplasty, the surgical removal of a rib which would supposedly allow a lung to collapse and heal. Period photographs add depth to the story and an author’s note provides additional information. Evvy’s voice captures the resentment, fear, determination, and hope of a young patient fighting an insidious disease with no real cure.

 

Evvy could very well be one of the young ladies pictured in the dramatic cover photograph of Jim Murphy’s Invincible Microbe: Tuberculosis and the Never Ending Search for a Cure. This is an impeccably researched narrative nonfiction title complete with photographs, prints, and source notes. Murphy starts with the history of this deadly germ and offers evidence of tuberculosis in a 500,000 year old fossilized skull. Murphy also details the many ineffectual treatments in ancient Egypt and Greece before following the course of the dread disease through Europe and America. Finally, readers learn of the social history and impact of tuberculosis. Examples include chapters describing the warped nineteenth-century romantic view of the disease, and the difficulties encountered by African-Americans and immigrants in their search for treatment. The research, photographs, notes and easy narrative flow make this biography of a disease a fascinating read.

Maureen

 
 

Body Snatcher

Body Snatcher

posted by:
October 17, 2012 - 7:11am

Every DayWhat makes us who we are? Our parents tell us it is what’s on the inside that counts, and not how we look. David Levithan turns this old adage on its ear with his newest book Every Day. The reader follows A, the main character, through the changing days of life—literally. Every morning, A wakes up in a different body. Always approximately the same age, always in the same geographical area, but never the same body twice. A can access the body’s knowledge and memories, but A remains a separate person existing inside of someone else.

 

This nomadic life is all A has ever known, and it is usually fine, until one morning A meets Rhiannon, the girlfriend of the body A is inhabiting for that day. An instant spark ignites, and suddenly A does not want to leave her. A begins “kidnapping” people in order to be near Rhiannon. Should A share the secret with her, and would she believe it? Is there any way for them to have a future together?

 

Author/Collaborator/Editor Levithan has created a fascinating character in A, who is neither male nor female, thin nor fat, tall nor short, white nor non-white. As the reader plunges in, seemingly endless questions arise. Does A live the perfect life, forever experiencing a new day, or is it a perfect trap? How much do we really touch other people’s lives every day? Do we really exist if no one else knows or loves us? Every Day makes the reader think about the intangibility of life and love, as well as what makes us each unique.

Sam

categories:

 
 

Some Say the World Will End in Fire

AfterEven after the smoke clears, technology fails, science runs amuck, society as we know it collapses and the power-drunk take over, there is still a glimmer of hope for mankind. After: Nineteen Stories of Apocalypse and Dystopia presents tales that take place after of the end of the world as we knew it. Editors Ellen Datlow and Terri Windling commissioned work from some of the most popular and critically acclaimed authors for young adults. The resulting stories are both disturbing and thought-provoking, leaving readers pondering the what-ifs.

 

Carrie Ryan explores the zombie territory that made her name as a writer in “After the Cure,” where the teen protagonist has been “rehabilitated” from her former life as a member of a pack of the bloodthirsty undead. The zombie plague began as a diet drug gone wrong; the girl’s secret--her taste for flesh has merely been sublimated. Science again spins out of control in “Fake Plastic Trees” by fantasy author Caitín R. Kiernan, where a replicating “goo” intended to provide food for an ever-expanding population goes rogue. The nano-assemblers creating the substance begin rapidly transforming “just about anything” into plastic. Narrator Cody tells her story after The Event, but the threat of mutating strains of nanos persists.

 

Echoes of Nazi and Khmer Rouge soldiers brutalizing families under a dictator’s orders make Susan Beth Pfeffer’s “Reunion” one of the most chilling stories of the lot. Set entirely in an office where the walls and even the lone window have been painted a dull brown, the leader of a totalitarian government in a nameless location has fallen. Isabella’s mother seeks her oldest daughter, who had been taken away years ago by soldiers and given to a childless colonel and his wife. How will they know for certain which of the brainwashed young women is really Maria?

 

An afterword by the editors chronicles a brief history of teen interest in the dystopian genre, which has its roots in often-assigned adult classics written by authors such as H.G. Wells, Aldous Huxley, Ray Bradbury and William Golding. The stories of After make worthy thematic companions.

Paula G.

 
 

Lost Connections

Lost Connections

posted by:
October 16, 2012 - 6:03am

The Distance Between UsWhile America continues to debate immigration reform, Mexican-born author Reyna Grande has placed a human face on her own family’s painful struggles to emerge from the shadows. In her moving memoir, The Distance Between Us, the physical journey of illegally emigrating from one of the poorest states in Mexico to a Los Angeles Latino neighborhood a quarter century ago extracts a high emotional cost in the quest for a better life. As a young child in Iguala, Mexico, Reyna Grande believed that the country on “the other side” gobbled up parents. When Reyna’s own parents leave for “el otro lado” to find work, she and her older siblings are left behind with a cruel grandmother. Reyna depends on her older sister, Mago, who becomes the “little mother”--understanding too well the breach in trust that has occurred. They ache helplessly for their absent alcoholic father and indifferent mother, who returns only to leave again.

 

The author never forgets her roots, nor does she make excuses in telling this coming of age story. She examines with sharp focus and a renewed compassion the actions of her flawed parents and the life-altering repercussions for all involved. Through the grim realities of her early life and the "broken beauty" of her native country, she captures her own voice as a young child with matter of fact clarity.  When her father finally returns for her and her siblings, the border crossing on foot is perilous. "We became lizards, rubbing our bellies against the cold, damp earth, trying to find a place to hide," she recalls. Sadly, entry into the U.S. brings its own hardships, brought on by living with an explosive father. Readers of Angela’s Ashes and The Glass Castle will recognize the familiar, true theme of a family's breakdown, and the resilience and tenuous steps that lead to understanding and forgiveness. Teen readers of memoir will benefit from gleaning a perspective on a modern immigrant experience so close to home.

Cynthia

 
 

Flappers & Murder-ski

Flappers & Murder-ski

posted by:
October 15, 2012 - 9:22am

The DivinersPrintz Award-winning author Libba Bray has taken readers to Victorian England, crashed us on a deserted island and driven us on mad road trips. In her newest title, The Diviners, Bray drops us in New York City during the Roaring Twenties. The issues of the day are Prohibition, Civil rights, corruption, speakeasies, and murder. Hot Socks!

 

Sixteen-year-old Evie O’Neill is much too wild and free-spirited for small-town Ohio. After a scandalous party, she is sent to New York City to live with her uncle, the curator of a museum. This sounds like a dream come true for Evie, who plunges headlong into the thrilling nightlife of the city. Fun is the name of the game until a serial killer begins a rampage and young flappers begin to fear the night.

 

Uncle Will’s museum contains unusual items of American folklore and superstition and is known around town as the Museum of the Creepy Crawlies. When the police come to Will for help in finding the killer, Evie must decide if she will share the secret that has been at the root of her wildness. Evie is a Diviner--she receives images and feelings from touching objects. Should she use her ability to aid in the investigation? If it will get her uncle off of her back and get her back to having fun in the big city, you bet-ski!

 

Bray has another winner in The Diviners, a well-researched and humorous treat. Evie’s voice is perfectly teenaged-Twenties, full of the colloquialisms and slang of the times. She treats the gruesome murders and her growing affection for the roguish thief Sam with the same level of concern, thus balancing the dark, heavy plot with light, hearty chuckles here and there. Supporting characters include numbers runners and Ziegfeld girls, and side stories are just developed enough to arouse curiosity, which will leave readers anxious for book 2 in this planned trilogy.

Sam

 
 

Imagine All the People

Imagine All the People

posted by:
October 15, 2012 - 7:45am

Memoirs of an Imaginary FriendBudo and Max are best friends. Budo is five with many friends, but he is second-grader Max’s only friend. Max is “on the spectrum,” living someplace undefined in the lands of autism and Asperger’s syndrome. Budo, too, has his challenges, not the least of which is that he is imaginary. In Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend by Matthew Dicks, Budo not only draws us into Max’s world but into his own rich life as well.

 

For Max, elementary school is fraught with peril; between bullies in the bathroom, playtime politics at recess, and mainstreaming in the classroom, he views his time with the resource center aide Mrs. Patterson as a respite from the confusing challenges that other people present. Budo spends his time guiding Max through his day but when Max is sleeping or intently playing with his Legos and soldiers, Budo is free to explore. Making trips to a convenience store, hanging out in the school office, and mentoring other pretend friends—he is ancient in terms of imaginaries’ longevity—Budo is an engaging mix of child and sage. One afternoon, Max disappears from school. When the teachers, police, and Max’s parents are unable to find him, Budo springs into action to find his friend. When Budo uncovers what he calls “the actual devil in the actual pale moonlight,” he is forced to decide between his love and sense of responsibility for Max or his own very existence.

 

Memoirs of an Imaginary Friend has been compared to bestsellers Room and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Nighttime for its uncanny representation of little boys’ thought processes and understanding of the adult world, as well as its accurate depiction of a child on the autism spectrum. Dicks writes this surprising story with tenderness, compassion, and humor.

 

Lori

categories:

 
 

Family Secrets and Country Stars

Miss Me When I'm GoneGretchen Waters had an exciting life, one tragically cut short by a fall down an icy set of library stairs. In Miss Me When I’m Gone by Emily Arsenault, her accidental death turns out to be much more when her best friend, Jamie Madden, begins researching Gretchen’s papers and her past.

 

This story is a unique blend of southern honky-tonk country and New England mystery. Gretchen’s success had come via a book, Tammyland, which she wrote following her own divorce. A travel memoir of sorts, Gretchen toured the southern states, visiting sites of famous female country music stars and writing about their lives while reflecting on her own. A second book was in the works, and Jamie soon discovers that it is an even more personal investigation into Gretchen’s own life and childhood. As she talks with more people, Jamie senses that Gretchen’s death may not have been simply an accident. 

 

Although a mystery, this book has elements of fun and quirkiness, especially the interspersed biographies on country music singers which are excerpted from the fictitious Tammyland. It’s hard to imagine how one chapter about Tammy Wynette could lead seamlessly into another chapter about a quest to find one’s biological father, but Arsenault makes it work and keeps the story fresh and engaging. This book is an enjoyable read; it may even provide inspiration to visit some country music sites, or at least sing along to a few Dolly Parton tunes!

Melanie

 
 

Then and Now

Then and Now

posted by:
October 15, 2012 - 6:55am

Cold LightThings are intense at age fourteen, and our perceptions of events are not always entirely clear. Cold Light by Jenn Ashworth examines the friendship between Lola and Chloe, as well as the tragic aftermath of Chloe’s suicide. The reader meets Lola in the present day, now going by her given name Laura. She is watching a report on the news about the building of a memorial for Chloe next to the man-made lake where she died. When the shovel is pressed into the earth to break ground, something is struck and a body is uncovered. Lola is transfixed for she knows far too well who the victim is, and her story begins to unfold.

 

Traveling back in time ten years, Lola relives the events that transpired when she was fourteen. She is the daughter of two older parents, Barbara and Donald. Donald is unusual, possibly manic-depressive, but his malady is never defined. He spends his time either hidden in his room or coming up with wildly implausible theories that then have to be publicly explored. Because of this, Lola is shunned at school until she makes the acquaintance of the beautiful Chloe who takes Lola as her confidant and friend. The young women’s friendship grows until Chloe meets her boyfriend Carl, who is several years older than her. At the same time, the town is thrown into unrest as an unknown man begins to attack young women.

 

Cold Light is a tragic tale told from the point of view of someone now older and wiser, looking back on events and trying to make sense of them. The story unfolds slowly and the reader is swept along as each new piece of information adds to the mystery and suspense. Whose body has been found by the memorial? How did it get there? And, ultimately, what does Lola know and how is she involved? Cold Light is a well-written suspense story that will thrill any mystery lover.

 

Doug

categories: