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Applegate Takes the 2013 Newbery Medal

 

The One and Only IvanThe Newbery award, given for “the most distinguished contribution to children’s literature” by the American Library Association, was announced yesterday. The 2013 medal winner is The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate, a book narrated by an artistic silverback gorilla who has spent the majority of his life on display at a circus-themed shopping mall. Ivan never questions his life in captivity, until the arrival of Ruby, a young elephant who has been taken from her family. Applegate’s award-winning novel explores themes of friendship, humanity and the idea that it’s never too late to become the person—or gorilla—you’re meant to be.

 

The Newbery committee also named three honor books for 2013. Baltimorean Laura Amy Schlitz, librarian at The Park School, was given the nod for her complex, suspenseful Dickensian tale, Splendors and Glooms. Orphans Lizzie Rose and Parsefall, assistants to an evil puppeteer, Grisini, must clear their names when they are all implicated in the disappearance of Clara, the only daughter of a wealthy doctor. The children must escape not only Grisini, but his longtime rival, a powerful witch. Schlitz was the winner of the 2008 Newbery medal for Good Masters!, Sweet Ladies!: Voices from a Medieval Village.

 

A second honor novel is Sheila Turnage’s Three Times Lucky, set in the small town of Tupelo Landing, North Carolina.Told in a distinctly Southern voice, this character-rich novel follows strong-willed sixth grader Mo LoBeau as she and her best friend, Dale Earnhardt Johnson III, attempt to find out the truth behind a murder. Rounding out the list of Newbery honor books is a nonfiction title, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon by Steve Sheinkin. A well-written, true historical thriller, Shienkin’s book provides an in-depth exploration of the scientists, politicians, and spies involved in the creation of the devastating atomic bomb. While written for a teen audience, Bomb will appeal to older history buffs as well.

 

Splendors and GloomsThree Times LuckyBomb

Paula G.

 
 

The Lioness Sings

The Lioness Sings

posted by:
January 29, 2013 - 9:15am

AlannaEstablished in 1988, The Margaret A. Edwards Award honors an author, as well as a specific body of his or her work, for significant and lasting contribution to young adult literature. It recognizes an author's work in helping adolescents become aware of themselves and addressing questions about their role and importance in relationships, society, and in the world. The honor was awarded this year by the American Library Association to Tamora Pierce. On her website, Pierce explains her writing style, even as a young girl:

 

"I got hooked on fantasy, and then on science fiction, and both made their way into my stories. I tried to write the kind of thing I was reading, with one difference: the books I loved were missing teenaged girl warriors."

 

Pierce has been called a pioneer in feminist fantasy literature. Her books have been translated into German, Danish, Swedish, Hungarian and Japanese, beginning with Alanna: The First Adventure (in the Song of the Lioness series) in 1983. Fans and new readers alike can learn more about Pierce by visiting her blog Dare to be Stupid or by checking out her books. One final quote from the award-winning Pierce:

 

"Books are still the main yardstick by which I measure true wealth."

Sam

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Creation 2.0

Creation 2.0

posted by:
January 29, 2013 - 8:45am

Eve & AdamHusband and wife team Michael Grant and Katherine Applegate, the authors of the popular Animorphs series, team up once again to write Eve & Adam. The novel might seem as though it’s about any other teenage girl, but there’s a lot more to Evening Spiker, better known as Eve, than it first seems. As the book begins, Eve is in a car accident, after which she is sent to Spiker Biopharm, the medical facility run by her controlling (and slightly scary) mother. There, Eve meets the mysterious Solo Plissken, who she eventually befriends and teams up with to investigate Spiker Biopharm.

 

Meanwhile, trying to keep Eve complacent, her mother gives her a genetics project to work on while she’s recovering. The project, nicknamed the Adam Project, sets Eve to work creating the perfect human boy—the Adam to her Eve. As she works on her project, and begins to spend more time with Solo, she forgets about her injury, so much so that she doesn’t realize how suspiciously fast she’s healing until Solo points it out to her. This revelation pushes Eve to help Solo investigate the genetic experiments her mother is running at Spiker Biopharm, and the two learn that the experiments are much closer to them than they ever could have expected.

 

Eve & Adam is a mix of science fiction and teenage romance. Despite some of the far-fetched aspects of the novel, the relationships between the characters are relatable. Though the novel begins slowly, it eventually becomes a page turner that the reader cannot put down. Grant and Applegate have written another novel that teens are sure to enjoy.

Laura

 
 

2013 Printz Award Announced

2013 Printz Award Announced

posted by:
January 28, 2013 - 4:16pm

In DarknessThe Michael L. Printz Award honors the best book written for teens each year. This year’s awards were announced by the American Library Association this morning and the winner is In Darkness by Nick Lake, a fictional account of the 2010 earthquake that devastated Haiti. Shorty is a teenage gangster who is in the wrong place at the wrong time. All alone and buried alive under the ruins of a hospital, Shorty’s connection with reality waxes and wanes as he tries to survive until rescue comes. Lake is a children’s book editor and the author of the Blood Ninja series.     

 

Four Printz honor books were also named for this year. Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz is the coming-of-age story of the unlikely friendship between two Mexican-American teens. Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein is the plot-twisting tale of a British female pilot in World War II. Terry Pratchett takes readers on a fantastical wild romp through Victorian London with Dodger. Finally, The White Bicycle by Beverley Brenna follows the journey through the south of France of a young woman with Asperger’s Syndrome.

 

 

 

 

 

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the UniverseCode Name VerityDodgerThe White Bicycle

Sam

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Caldecott Winners Revealed

 

This is Not my HatPicture book author and illustrator Jon Klassen, known for his wry illustrations rendered in a muted color palette, was honored today by the American Library Association with the Randolph Caldecott Medal for This is Not my Hat. The book follows a sly minnow who has purloined a hat from a much larger fish and is certain he will get away with his petty crime. The illustrations, however, tell a different story. The Caldecott Medal is awarded annually to the illustrator of “the most distinguished picture book for children.”

 

Five Caldecott Honor Books were also named, including Extra Yarn, another book illustrated by Klassen, written by Mac Barnett. Extra Yarn shows the power of one young girl to change her town through kindness and generosity. Rounding out the list are the boy-and-his-penguin tale One Cool Friend, written by Toni Buzzeo, and illustrated by David Small; Green, a meditation on the color, written and illustrated by Laura Vaccaro Seeger; the Twilight Zone-inspired Creepy Carrots!, written by Aaron Reynolds and illustrated by Peter Brown; and the lyrical bedtime story Sleep Like a Tiger, written by Mary Logue and illustrated by Pamela Zagarenski.

 

Extra YarnGreenCreepy Carrots!Sleep Like a TigerOne Cool Friend

Paula G.

 
 

A Winter’s Tale

A Winter’s Tale

posted by:
January 28, 2013 - 8:45am

The Lady Most WillingFriends and bestselling historical romance authors Julia Quinn, Eloisa James, and Connie Brockway have teamed up to bring readers The Lady Most Willing: A Novel in Three Parts, the story of an outrageous kidnapping plot that leads to four unlikely romances. Although romance authors frequently collaborate on collections of novellas, Quinn, James, and Brockway decided to try something a little different. Each wrote a part of a story that would become one cohesive novel. The result was their first shared novel The Lady Most Likely: A Novel in Three Parts. The trio enjoyed that project so much that they decided to try it again. When Brockway suggested a plot inspired by one of her favorite movies, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, The Lady Most Willing was born.

 

Laird Taran Ferguson wants his nephews to marry and produce heirs to secure the family line, so he hatches a drunken plan to kidnap eligible young ladies for them to marry. What could possibly go wrong? He and his men decide to capture three young heiresses, Lady Cecily Tarleton and sisters Fiona and Marilla Chisholm, from a ball at Bellemere Castle. During the raid, Taran’s men are confused about one of the ladies’ identity, and Catriona Burns is mistakenly taken, too. The inept kidnappers steal a carriage for their getaway, and The Duke of Bretton, who was sleeping off a substantial amount of brandy in his carriage, is also inadvertently abducted. The whole group is brought to Finovair Castle where they are snowed in together, and fate and love soon intervene. This witty, warm romance is the perfect antidote for a chilly winter night.

 

Beth

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A Masterpiece Redux

A Masterpiece Redux

posted by:
January 25, 2013 - 8:01am

The Art ForgerBoston artist Claire Roth is slowly rebuilding her life after a scandal three years ago nearly derailed her painting career. Now working as a master copyist of famous works for an online art broker, she knows that it is only a crime to copy a painting if that painting is sold as the original. What happens when the lines blur, the craquelure appears authentic, and the stakes are high? In her taut, twisty tale The Art Forger, B. A. Shapiro  reveals the underside of the art world  that revisits one of the most famous art heists of all time and the daunting challenge proving art provenance.

 

When the posh, well-connected collector, Aiden Markel, approaches Claire about reproducing a painting "not quite on the up and up" she can't resist. In exchange, Markel promises to provide Claire with a large sum of cash and an opportunity for a one-woman show at his prestigious gallery. The painting in question is an Edgar Degas masterpiece stolen over 20 years ago from the Gardner Museum.  Before long Claire realizes that the painting, too, is harboring its own secrets, and her Faustian agreement may cost her more than her expertise.

 

Shapiro's prose is ripe for those who enjoy art world intrigue with a splash of romance. Narrated in Claire's painter voice, back stories shed light on Claire's past scandal and the eccentric collector Isabella Stewart Gardner. Sidelights about successful forgers throughout history and their techniques add interesting color, as do details of Degas' use of light and color.  Although Shapiro's painting and relationships are imagined, the 1990 Gardner art theft remains unsolved today. Readers looking to read fascinating, true art history should try Edward Dolnick's The Forger's Spell: a True Story of Vermeer, Nazis, and the Greatest Art Hoax of the Twentieth Century or Ulrich Boser's The Gardner Heist: a True Story of the World's Largest Unsolved Art Theft.

Cynthia

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Terror on Six Legs

Terror on Six Legs

posted by:
January 25, 2013 - 7:01am

The ColonyReaders who have an unreasonable fear of insects should steer clear of the science thriller The Colony by A.J. Colucci. Others who might enjoy a tale of science gone mad, featuring man-eating ants who rise up and take over Manhattan, are in for the thrill ride of the year. A disgruntled scientist heads to Central Park with an ant queen, determined to make the world pay for past wrongs. But Cleopatra is no ordinary queen.  She is a Siafu Moto. Nearly an inch longer than ordinary ants, the Siafu Moto has an exoskeleton that is highly resistant to all known pesticides. They also have poison sacs filled with neurotoxins that are meant to paralyze their prey. One bite from one ant could hardly knock down a mammal the size of a human, but human rarely encounter just one ant. They crawl up walls and drop from ceilings, surrounding their prey, stripping their flesh, and leaving an empty husk.  Something needs to be done, so a well-known entomologist with a specialty in ants is called in. But even Paul O’Keefe is baffled on how to stop this growing colony, so he sends a military helicopter to pick up some back up--his ex-wife Kendra, who is currently studying fire ants in the desert.

  

A.J. Colucci writes a tight story for readers who enjoy a creature feature. The Colony is reminiscent of a B-movie, and although the ants in this novel don’t tower over your head, they are no less deadly. The novel is fast paced, has great action sequences and is a lot of fun to read. Be forewarned: read The Colony and you’ll be scrambling away the next time you see an ant on your picnic blanket!

Doug

 
 

Science by the Numbers

100 Diagrams That Changed the WorldMad ScienceTwo intriguing new books tackle science, inventions, and diagrams, and are perfect for armchair scientists looking to learn a little more about those things that made the world what it is today. 100 Diagrams That Changed the World: From the Earliest Cave Paintings to the Innovation of the iPod by Scott Christianson takes on the world of diagrams and explores their value to society. Some significant diagrams stand on their own, such as the Rosetta Stone, but many are actual drawings or plans of something tangible, like the cotton gin. Each double-page spread of this interesting and quick read shares a different diagram that impacted the world profoundly. Christanson arranges the diagrams chronologically starting with the Chavet Cave Drawings and ending with the iPod. All the diagrams in between are clearly illustrated and accompanied by text containing information about the development and significance of that diagram.  Readers will be instantly drawn in by these diagrams that transformed the shape of the world and impacted not only science, but culture and history as well.

 

Mad Science: Einstein’s Fridge, Dewar’s Flask, Mach’s Speed, and 362 Other Inventions That Made Our World, edited by Randy Alfred, offers a day-by-day calendar of science and technology tidbits from Wired Magazine’s popular This Day in Tech blog. Entries from forty contributors serve to highlight the each episode, discussing its history and value and sharing other notable events from the same day. From the Gregorian calendar, the breathalyzer, and the ballpoint pen, to the first coin operated café (the Horn & Hardart Automat in Philadelphia), the inventions are intriguing, entertaining, and momentous. Equal opportunity is afforded to all scientific fields, so there really is something for everyone, even those who absolutely dreaded high school science.

Maureen

 
 

Handicapping the Randolph Caldecott and John Newbery Medals

Step Gently OutTitanic: Voices from the DisasterSplendors and GloomsThe most prestigious awards for children's literature will be announced by the American Library Association at the Midwinter meeting in Seattle next Monday. A longstanding tradition of fans of literature for young people is guessing which titles will receive these prizes, which guarantee a sort of immortality for the books. "Honor" books, or runners-up, will also be announced for each category. The Randolph Caldecott Medal goes to the illustrator of the most distinguished American picture book for children. The previous year has seen a bevy of potential, worthy titles for the Caldecott Medal, among them three books by Philip and Erin Stead (who won a Caldecott Medal in 2011). Philip has two strong candidates in two sweet animal stories, A Home for Bird and Bear Has a Story to Tell, while Erin's homage to the end of winter And Then It's Spring could be named. More strong possibilities are Green by Laura Vaccaro Seeger, which covers the many shades of the verdant world; Paul Zelinsky's wacky alphabet book Z Is For Moose; and Step Gently Out, featuring close-up pictures of the insect world taken by Rick Lieber. It could receive the first Caldecott Medal given for photography. These, and many others, could win the big prize or be recognized as an honor book, in a wide open field.

 

The John Newbery Award goes to the "most distinguished contribution to American literature for children". Last year also brought a number of worthy and likely candidates, including two recent medalists. Local author Laura Amy Schlitz is once again a front runner with Splendors and Glooms, a glimpse inside the world of puppetry, while Rebecca Stead could take a prize for the artful and concise Liar and Spy. Katherine Applegate's tale of a lonely, long-suffering gorilla, The One and Only Ivan, receives a lot of mentions, as does R.A. Palacio's popular (too popular?) Wonder, the story of a boy with a facial deformity. In a strong year for nonfiction, Philip Hoose's Moonbird: a Year on the Wind with the Great Survivor B95, Steve Sheinkin's Bomb: the Race to Build and Steal the World's Most Dangerous Weapon, Deborah Hopkinson's Titanic: Voices from the Disaster, and We've Got a Job: the 1963 Birmingham Children's March by Cynthia Levinson all have reasonable hopes to receive notice from the committee. Stay tuned until Monday at 11:00am ET, when you can watch all of the awards given live from Seattle. 

Todd

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