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A Burglar’s Guide to the City

posted by: June 8, 2016 - 7:00am

A Burglar's Guide to the CityLogic. Problem-solving. Engineering. Physics. Architects have used these skills to create safe and accessible buildings for centuries. At the same time, burglars have been using these skills to figure out how to break into houses and buildings for an equally long time. A Burglar’s Guide to the City by Geoff Manaugh is written through the eyes and perspective of history’s most successful burglars. Manaugh writes, teaches and lectures on architecture, but he captures the thoughts, motives and passion of burglars with engaging, narrative prose in his book.

 

He begins with the story of notorious architect-turned-burglar George Leonidas Leslie, who used his architectural skills to perform hundreds of robberies in New York City in the late 1800s. The city was just beginning its development as a metropolis of wealth and affluence during the Industrial Revolution, and Leslie used this economic development to his advantage as he asked fellow architects about the structure of new buildings in the city. By gaining deeper architectural insight on the buildings he wanted to rob, he could create models and rehearse with his team, what Manaugh calls “the art of burglary.” A good burglar and a good architect both need impeccable attention to detail, and Manaugh writes of Leslie’s fervent planning and scheming with similar perspicacity.

 

Manaugh moves forward in history with other examples of burglaries to show that while buildings and security systems may change over time, it only inspires deeper and more complex problem-solving from burglars, reaping a bigger thrill and adrenaline rush as the stakes get higher. In addition, he writes of how architects have begun to anticipate crime in their building designs. Casinos are being designed specifically so that security cameras can be installed in ways that maximize their visual field while minimizing their noticeability. In the vast span of burglar history, Manaugh takes the reader deep into both the criminals and setting, showing how they work for and against each other in this entertaining nonfiction read.


 
 

Born for This

posted by: June 7, 2016 - 7:00am

Born for ThisChris Guillebeau makes a living traveling (he visited every country in the world before his 35th birthday), writing (his blog and several New York Times bestselling books) and only pursuing work that is personally meaningful to him. He has definitely hit the career lottery, and in his new book Born for This: How to Find the Work You Were Meant to Do, he explains how you can also find the work you were born to do.

 

Hitting the career lottery is not a far-fetched dream like matching all six Powerball numbers. It’s not a matter of luck but a matter of knowing yourself and engineering the right set of circumstances. Guillebeau points out that this is not a book designed to tell you how to quit your job and become your own boss (he already wrote that book — The $100 Startup). Whether you want to become an entrepreneur or find meaningful work within an established company, Guillebeau will help you identify your own personal intersection of joy, money and flow. Joy is what you love to do, money supports you and flow is the Zen-like state you experience when working on something you are exceptionally good at. The work you were born to do will hit all three targets.

 

There will be no precise syllabus to follow because the work that you were born to do is a path that only you can chart. However, the book contains exercises to help you identify what you’re best at and what makes you happy, checklists and stories of real people who have found unconventional routes to their dream jobs.

 

Guillebeau is also the author of The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life and The Art of Non-Conformity: Set Your Own Rules, Live the Life You Want and Change the World.


 
 

Wink Poppy Midnight

posted by: June 6, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Wink Poppy MidnightWink Poppy Midnight is original and utterly enchanting. April Genevieve Tucholke casts a spell over readers that will hold them in thrall until the last page.

 

The author reminds the readers that, like soups, all stories start with the same key ingredients. Every cohesive story has a hero, a villain and a secret. In this dark mystery, readers are never really sure who is who. Each chapter is alternately narrated by the three title characters and, as the story progresses, readers are less sure of who to trust.

 

For far too long, Midnight has been in love with Poppy, the gorgeous girl next door. Though he knows all too well that she is as cruel as she is beautiful, he has never been able to shake her control over him. Now that he and his father have moved to an old house outside of town, perhaps he will truly be able to get over Poppy. Midnight now finds himself living next to the eccentric Bell family. Everyone in town whispers that their mother is a witch because she tells fortunes from tea leaves and reads tarot cards. The kids run wild, and Midnight is drawn to their stories and games. Wink Bell, with her crazy red hair, freckles and overalls is the exact opposite of Poppy, and perhaps that is exactly what Midnight wants after all.

 

Don’t be tempted to label Wink Poppy Midnight a teen book with a mandatory love triangle. The characters feel variations of love, but it is more of a dark, mysterious fairy tale than a romance. The characters are complex and quirky. The writing is beautiful and smart. Tucholke seems to be spinning us a yarn with a sly smile on her face, trusting that her readers will get it and be delighted in the strangeness of it. Needless to say, I was.

 


 
 

Every Heart a Doorway

posted by: June 2, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Every Heart a DoorwayIf you were like me as a kid and read a lot of fantasy, you probably had no trouble believing that magic mirrors, wardrobes and tollbooths were everyday objects. That Narnia or Wonderland were one right-wrong turn away at any given moment. But the part of those stories I could never understand was the part where the kids go home at the end. If you really found a door to a world where magic was real why would you ever leave? Seanan McGuire’s Every Heart a Doorway asks a darker question: What would you do to get back?

 

Eleanor West’s Home for Wayward Children is a school for children coping with realness. Children who returned from magical worlds and desperately want to go back again. But their reasons for wanting to go back are more compelling than just wanting to fight dragons or whatever. These worlds offered them acceptance that they couldn’t find at home, a safe place to express their gender, sexuality, their personality. Plus dragons. Who wouldn’t want to go back?

 

But now someone’s threatening the safety of everyone on campus. Someone who would do anything to return to their world, and everyone’s a suspect.

 

With this book, McGuire has crafted not just one world but multiple worlds of compelling characters and situations, all nested inside one slim novella. Fans of the novel and TV series The Magicians will appreciate this clever deconstruction and homage to the fantasy genre.

 


 
 

Spring Cookbooks for Different Skill Levels

posted by: June 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Love and Lemons CookbookCover art for The Field to Table CookbookNow that it has finally warmed up, it’s time to get outdoors for a cookout or picnic and take advantage of the farmers markets! Here are some new cookbooks, on different levels of complexity, to inspire you and get you started.

 

Casual and home cooks will find serviceable recipes in The Love & Lemons Cookbook by Jeanine Donofrio. In this bright and engaging book, Donofrio takes a practical approach to food, contextualizing her meals by what is in season and readily available in the pantry. She is quick to provide advice for those nights when you don’t feel like laboring over a stove after work and includes suggestions for reenergizing leftovers. All of her recipes are vegetarian, and it is easy to pair them with a cut of meat or, in the opposite direction, adapt them to become vegan or gluten-free. If you have signed up for a CSA share this season, Love & Lemons can get you started figuring out what to do with the less common vegetables that might crop up in your share — like kohlrabi and parsnips. Many more recipes are also available on Donofrio’s award-winning blog.

 

Photo of blackberry empanadas

For gourmands looking for a challenge, there is The Field to Table Cookbook by Susan L Ebert, a manifesto that is the culmination of her previous work editing Rodale’s Organic Life (formerly Organic Gardening) and Texas Parks & Wildlife magazines. Ebert has shaped her life around a philosophy that puts the sustainability of her resources as the foremost consideration. She hunts, fishes, forages and farms for as much of her food as she can within the season and has closely researched where her food grows, including population statistics of the wildlife she shoots, chemical analyses of soil composition in her garden and snapshots on the history of American agricultural practices. It may take all day or longer to cook the meals precisely as Ebert does, but, through her writing, she demonstrates how sourcing your own food is not drudgery but an adventure. As much Jack London as Alice Waters, descriptions of tracking her quarry are laced with reminisces of stargazing and sunrises, meditations on the afternoons she spent as a child picking fruit and fishing trips spent with her own children. Those readers who might be squeamish or critical of Ebert’s hunting and fishing will be swayed by her reasoning and find a sympathetic pen from a woman not above crying for a goose she will later eat. It is worth noting that because Ebert’s lifestyle is so closely entwined with the environment and culture of her Texas home some of her meals, like Feral Hog Chile Verde, will be difficult to make here in Baltimore without relying on imports. Nevertheless, there is enough overlap between the Texas and Maryland climates to try out or adapt plenty of the recipes — homages to Chesapeake Bay seafood pop up surprisingly often!

Liz

Liz

 
 

Summer Book Buzz

posted by: June 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for GruntCover art for HomecomingLooking for the next buzzworthy title or the perfect beach read? BCPL librarians are sharing and discussing the must-have books for summer at Book Buzz sessions at various library branches. Join us and you’ll have an instant summer reading list!

 

We’re talking about so many great summer reads, but here’s a quick look at our favorites. Nonfiction readers should not miss Mary Roach’s newest, Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War, in which she applies her childlike sense of wonder and curiosity to war by asking all the questions that pop into her head when visiting military research facilities from Natick Soldier Systems Center to the nearby Aberdeen Proving Ground.

 

Fiction readers will devour these favorites which include Yaa Gyasi’s Homegoing, a debut novel which Ta-Nehisi Coates called an “inspiration.” Told in 14 chapters spanning 250 years, each chapter tells the story of a descendant of two sisters from Ghana. Another debut getting considerable attention is Lily and the Octopus by Steven Rowley, a charming study of loneliness, the limits of one’s sanity and the powerful bond between a man and his dog.

 

In the mood for a thriller? Be sure to check out City of the Lost by Kelley Armstrong set in Rockton, a secret town in the far north of Canada where the hunted go to hide. Casey and her best friend each have reasons to disappear, but upon arriving in Rockton they realize they may be in even more danger. Wendy Walker’s All Is Not Forgotten follows teen Jenny Kramer’s brutal rape and the repercussions when her parents opt to try a new drug offered by doctors that will eradicate the memory of the rape.

 

My favorite is Leigh Himes’ The One That Got Away, which centers on Abbey Lahey, an overworked mom whose life is in a rut when she spies a former suitor, Alexander van Holt, in the pages of Town & Country. She immediately wonders “what if” and can’t stop thinking about how her life would have been different. When she wakes in the hospital from an accidental fall, she is Mrs. Alexander van Holt with money, privilege and status. But is it all she dreamed it would be? Be sure to join us to hear about more hot titles at a Book Buzz near you.


 
 

Help Us! Great Warrior

posted by: May 31, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Help Us! Great WarriorThe biggest hero of our time, the only creature that can rescue this dimension from an invasion of demons, the Greatest Warrior of our world…is a bean-shaped little scamp. More monster than human, more lazy than adventuring and more gluttonous than anything, the protagonist of Help Us! Great Warrior is not exactly the picture that comes to mind when imagining a legendary hero. She’s a three-foot-tall orb that wears boots and a bow on her head. She wields a sword and shield when she feels like it, but mostly because one’s shaped like a heart and the other has a cute bunny for a handle. When called upon to save the world by Hadiyah, the legendary guardian and keeper of the hero registry, her response is an awe inspiring, “Nah.” Only when her villagers are threatened — and with the encouragement of her best friend Leo — does she finally drag herself into battle.

 

Quirky is an understatement when it comes to the adorable, whimsical, bizarre story of Help Us! Great Warrior. It’s artistically bright and bouncy, with soft and appealing characters that make an instant and lasting impact as you enjoy each page. The humor hinges on the bizarre and unexpected, reminding readers not only visually but story-wise of other children’s epics like Adventure Time. Prepare to be enchanted by Great Warrior and her journey. She’s especially great for kids and especially inspiring for young girls, but a delight to all ages.


 
 

Dear Mr. You

posted by: May 26, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Dear Mr. YouWhen you think celebrity memoir, a series of letters dedicated to various men isn’t necessarily what comes to mind first. But Mary-Louise Parker’s Dear Mr. You is more than that. Using letter writing as a vehicle, Parker explores her relationships with the men she has met, may meet or never got a chance to meet, and by doing so revels in the way her relationships shape her life.

 

While her letters are candid, ranging from the erotic to the brutally honest, Parker doesn’t indulge in any kind of exposé or scandal; in fact she rarely names the addressees by their full names, so anyone looking for scandalous celebrity gossip may be a bit disappointed in that regard. Instead, what Parker creates is a poetic addition to the memoir genre. She tells her life story by reflecting on the lives and experiences of others, from the grandfather she never knew to a cab driver she would never meet again. While not all memories of the men who have come and gone from her life are pleasant, Parker embraces the good and the bad — the impersonal stranger, the demanding mentor, the intimate lover — and thanks each for the mark they have left on her life.

 

Lyrical and poignant, Dear Mr. You is many things in one slim volume. It’s a contemplation of the impact men have on their relationships, and a reminder that even trifling interactions between two people can leave a lasting impression. Ultimately, it is an epistolary reflection on how a life is shaped by people — living, dead or imagined. Reminiscent of Joan Didion’s works, Dear Mr. You is a celebration of a life through the lens of relationships from the trivial to the significant.

 


 
 

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