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Suddenly Single

Suddenly Single

posted by:
January 22, 2015 - 8:00am

The Divorce Diet by Ellen HawleyEllen Hawley introduces readers to Abigail in The Divorce Diet. She loves her baby Rosie, her husband Thad and food. She just doesn’t love the newly gained baby weight and is convinced that shedding those pounds will renew her husband’s attention. With the help of an imaginary guru, the author of a diet lifestyle book, she is ready to achieve her weight-loss goal. But when Thad announces that he’s not sure about this marriage and fatherhood thing, her world crumbles. Even his reassurances that it’s not her, it’s him have little impact when she realizes it’s not her, it’s his new girlfriend.

 

Abigail moves back to her parents’ house, tries to find a job and raise a daughter all while coping with the notion of Thad’s girlfriend sleeping in her bed. Is it really possible to stick to a diet under such circumstances? As she comes to grips with her situation, she follows the advice of her guru to make an inventory of her skills. Abigail loves eating food, but she also loves preparing food which leads to a promising restaurant job. This is the first step in the reinvention of Abigail as she begins to shape her life into the one she really wanted all along.

 

Hawley has created a completely recognizable and relatable character in Abigail whose sense of humor sees her through trying times. Abigail shares humorous takes on her daily dietetic meals and exercise ideas which will keep readers laughing out loud throughout the book. Don’t be alarmed that the included recipes contain anything but the most comfortable of comfort foods, including chocolate cake and meatloaf with ham and cheese. This is a snarky take on marriage, motherhood and divorce, but at the same time is a discerning and considerate look at the life of a single mom struggling to do the best for herself and her daughter.

Maureen

categories:

 
 

Good Intentions Gone Wrong

Dangerous Deception by Peg KehretEmmy Rushford is a precocious and civic-minded 6th grader. When her class is assigned to do a community service project, Emmy thinks she has a great idea: Her group will collect food for a local less fortunate family. On the surface, this may sound like a good idea, but Emmy is not telling the whole story to her classmates or her family. In Peg Kehret’s book, Dangerous Deception, Emmy begins innocently enough but she is soon put in harm’s way.

 

Kehret makes Emmy a rather mature-for-her-years but believable character who wants to do good but naively believes she can handle some very adult issues. The family that Emmy is trying to help is in trouble. However, she cannot turn to her parents or teacher for help without exposing some lies she has told. Kehret sets up a dilemma for her heroine that may seem a bit beyond the abilities of most 6th graders, but she keeps Emmy from becoming a superhero. She is flawed but well-intentioned, and young readers may learn a lesson or two from some of Emmy’s poor decisions. 

Regina

 
 

Heartbreaking Loss

Heartbreaking Loss

posted by:
January 20, 2015 - 8:00am

I Was Here by Gayle FormanUnlike Gayle Forman’s previous two-book series (If I Stay/Where She Went and Just One Day/Just One Year,) I Was Here, is a standalone novel. Nevertheless, it feels very much like her previous novels. I Was Here is heartbreaking and beautifully written, with characters that are relatable. The novel begins after the funeral for Cody’s best friend Meg, who partway through her freshman year of college commits suicide. Cody and Meg had been almost inseparable since they became friends in kindergarten, and now Cody, left behind, must figure out how to deal with the loss of her best friend and her guilt at not being able to stop Meg before it was too late.

 

After graduating from high school, Cody and Meg began to drift apart as Meg left their small Northwestern town to attend college in Tacoma, Washington on a scholarship, and Cody stayed behind to go to community college. Cody felt like their friendship was changing, which only adds to her guilt when she receives Meg’s goodbye email. When Meg’s parents ask Cody to go to her dorm room and bring her things home, Cody sees it as a request she can’t deny. There Cody meets Meg’s former roommates and begins to discover more about her recent life which sets her on a journey to find out why Meg made the decision to end her life.

 

I Was Here is a heartbreaking story of young adults dealing with friendship, love, loss and guilt. Forman again deals with difficult issues like depression and suicide. Best for older readers, I Was Here is a strong follow-up to Forman’s other novels.

Laura

 
 

Ode to Troy McClure, Bill Clinton, Frankenstein and the Unfrozen Caveman Lawyer

Cover art for You Might Remember Me

For eight seasons on Saturday Night Live, Phil Hartman’s comedic genius delighted audiences. Known as “The Glue” among his castmates, Hartman’s many impersonations and broad characters revitalized the show after one of its darkest periods. Beyond SNL, Hartman was a beloved voice on The Simpsons as well as the bombastic Bill McNeal on the critically lauded show NewsRadio. Poised to make a superstar breakout in several summer films of 1998, life was great for the comedian.

 

But in the early morning hours of May 28, 1998, police released the shocking news that Phil Hartman had been killed by his wife, Brynn, in their home while their children slept. For such a funny man to meet such a tragic end seemed unbelievable as fans, friends and costars tried to make sense of the loss to the comedy world at large. In You Might Remember Me: The Life and Times of Phil Hartman, biographer Mike Thomas stresses that what a person thinks of when she or he thinks about Phil Hartman isn’t his death, but the life of a performer whose talent gave laughter to so many.

 

Chock-full of interviews with family and famous friends, the book delves into Hartman’s childhood — as one of eight children, he often had to “perform” to be noticed. It also highlights his early career as a successful graphic artist (he designed album covers for bands like Poco and America) to his breakthrough with The Groundlings. From helping Paul Reubens hone the character of Pee-Wee Herman to developing his own popular character Chick Hazard, Phil Hartman seemed an enigma: someone committed to performing without really wanting to stick to it for long. He was someone waiting for the next big thing, but only if the next big thing fit in with the lifestyle he wanted.

 

You Might Remember Me paints a picture of a man searching for an identity: one that he could never quite completely cover with wigs and prosthetic noses. It is a great read for fans of Hartman’s work and for those who enjoy biographies of complicated, delicate genius, both in the moment and ahead of its time.

 

Jessica

 
 

Finding Denzel

Finding Denzel

posted by:
January 16, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for Right Color Wrong CultureAn absorbing study of a timely subject, Right Color, Wrong Culture is an allegorical tale focusing on the challenges and rewards of cultivating a multiethnic organization. In his thoughtful, carefully composed new work, author Bryan Loritts analyzes the specific kind of leadership needed to make connections and build thriving multicultural organizations.

 

Loritts’ central theme explores the premise that in each ethnic group there exist three faces of cultural expression: C1s, those who assimilate entirely from one culture or ethnic group into another; C3s, who are culturally inflexible, resisting assimilation of any kind; and in the middle, C2s, who are culturally flexible and adaptable without losing their ethnic identity. Personifying these faces, Loritts cites Carlton Banks, Ice Cube and Denzel Washington, respectively.

 

Careful to note the ties between culture and ethnicity while recognizing that one is not de facto the other, Loritts proceeds to examine the specific leadership principles vital to the success of a multiethnic, culturally diverse organization. In the case presented, it is an ethnically and culturally homogenous church that the principal characters are striving to transition toward a multicultural identity. Nevertheless, Loritts’ lessons about balanced, intuitive leadership and the practical challenges present in such a transition are applicable to any organization.

 

One of the most compelling aspects of RCWC is the narrative format Loritts has shrewdly chosen to deliver his message. Though a work of nonfiction, RCWC reads more like a novella. His use of a cast of characters to explore the challenges and viewpoints surrounding the case presented is an effective vehicle for what could otherwise be a polarizing subject. Recommended for readers seeking to promote multiculturalism within their own organizations as well as those readers who are simply interested in engaging in a deeper understanding of multiculturalism overall.

 

Meghan

categories:

 
 

Finding Light in the Dark

Finding Light in the Dark

posted by:
January 14, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for All the Bright PlacesOne day during their senior year, Theodore Finch and Violet Markey find each other on the bell tower at their Indiana high school, each contemplating ending their lives. Violet saves Finch or Finch saves Violet (that part is unclear to both them and the reader), but what is important is that they both leave the bell tower alive and now their lives are inextricably linked. Jennifer Niven’s All the Bright Places tells the story of Finch and Violet’s lives after that fateful day.

 

Violet’s life has been forever changed since her sister died in a car accident that she survived. Since the accident, she hasn’t been herself — refusing to drive in cars, not writing, disengaging from her friends and ending up at the bell tower with Finch. Finch goes through periods of days or weeks when he shuts down and sleeps, but when he’s awake, life isn’t much better. He’s abused by his father who has left his family for a “better” one, and everyone at school thinks he’s a freak, so he spends his time thinking about death and ways he could commit suicide. But after the bell tower, Finch and Violet begin spending more time together — initially because they’re working on a school project together that has them wandering around Indiana, but eventually because they find they help each other grow.

 

All the Bright Places is “the story of a boy called Finch and a girl named Violet,” but it’s also a beautifully told story of grief, depression and finding yourself again. Niven has written a powerful, heartbreaking, romantic novel that is difficult to put down. All the Bright Places is set to become a film starring Elle Fanning.

 

Laura

 
 

Secret Life of a Magician

Secret Life of a Magician

posted by:
January 12, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for The Magician's LiePoet, playwright and novelist Greer Macallister inspires intrigue with The Magician’s Lie. While Macallister’s plays have been performed at the American University and she has been published in periodicals such as the North American Review, this is her debut novel.

 

The Amazing Arden is one of the few female magicians in the early 1900s, which is controversial enough without her being wanted in question for her husband’s murder. Virgil, a down on his luck police officer, stumbles upon Arden and, though he is able to restrain her, he is unsure of her. As the capture would substantially boost his status, Virgil is conflicted about how to proceed.

 

After bringing the magician to his office and restraining her with several pairs of handcuffs, he allows her to recount her story before deciding how to move forward. Arden’s story is so captivating that Virgil can’t help but be taken in by her resilience and attention to detail. It’s in the midst of the narrative when Virgil learns that Arden may just have something to offer Virgil that he can’t get elsewhere, leaving him with a tough decision to make.

 

Macallister is able to use Arden’s story to pull the reader into history and what life was like for a young woman with few options in the late 1800s and early 1900s. With Arden’s success she is able to challenge the traditional gender roles for woman of the time, transforming her character into an inspiration. If after reading this you are looking for another historical fiction novel with a strong female protagonist, look to Vanessa and Her Sister by Priya Parmar.

Randalee

 
 

How Well Do We Really Know Jane Austen?

Cover art for First ImpressionsJane Austen apparently got the idea for Pride and Prejudice from an 80 year old minister named Mansfield. At least, that’s the general premise in Charles Lovett’s novel First Impressions: A Novel of Old Books, Unexpected Love, and Jane Austen which delves into possible connections between Austen and Mansfield. Told in chapters that jump back and forth between Austen’s time and the present, Lovett’s modern day heroine, Sophie Collingwood, is part Austen scholar and part amateur sleuth.

 

Sophie’s world has centered on her beloved Uncle Bertram who introduced her to great writers such as Austen. When Bertram dies of an alleged accidental fall down his stairs, Sophie begins to suspect that someone may have wanted her uncle dead. It all seems to be related to an obscure book in her uncle’s collection written by Mansfield that may shed some light on the true authorship of Pride and Prejudice. However, as she digs into the mystery of her Uncle’s death and the missing manuscript, Sophie puts herself into a very dangerous situation.

 

Lovett is at his best when he is engaged in the modern day writing of the conflicts and crises in Sophie’s rather than Austen’s world. While this book is a work of fiction, there are some historical facts mixed in. After finishing this book, readers may want to do some research on their own to discover which parts are invented and which parts are true.

 

Regina

 
 

Hidden Reservoir

Hidden Reservoir

posted by:
January 8, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for EbolaRolling up your sleeve for your flu shot this season, you probably did not think about the zoonoses you are keeping at bay. A zoonosis describes an infection that is transmitted from animal to human. The flu falls into this nasty category, as do other scary things like West Nile Virus, Lyme disease, rabies and, yes, Ebola. Science writer and explorer David Quammen is not trying to scare us in his slender but potent new book, Ebola: The Natural and Human History of a Deadly Virus. Rather, he provides much needed perspective on the 2014 epidemic in West Africa that dominated the news here and abroad.

 

Where did Ebola come from? That's the question everyone wants answered about a disease whose first recognized emergence dates to 1976. Quammen takes us back to that point and the consequences of interconnected ecosystems. He writes in layman's terms about early efforts to sequester various species for testing only to be disappointed each time. "It was Zorro, it was the Swamp Fox, it was Jack the Ripper — dangerous, invisible, gone," Quammen says. This is the problem with a disease that moves, or spills over, from animals to humans. Identifying the reservoir host animal is key to understanding how the virus wreaks havoc, then disappears again, for perhaps decades. The need for containment is great for fear that it will eventually adapt. For scientists, the hunt is on.

 

Quammen, who extracted and updated material from his 2012 book, Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic, spent time in the jungles of Gabon, where he first encountered the "peculiar, disconcerting disease." Through interviews with laboratory sleuths and Ebola victims' families he fills in as many blanks as possible, writing in a highly readable journalistic style. Readers of Richard Preston's The Hot Zone, whom Quammen gently takes to task in his book, will find a fast-paced science mystery that urgently begs solving.

Cynthia

 
 

Swept Away

Swept Away

posted by:
January 7, 2015 - 8:00am

Cover art for Storm SurgeWith infinite care, deep detail and vast meteorological knowledge, Adam Sobel recounts the events leading up to one of the most destructive storms in history in Storm Surge: Hurricane Sandy, Our Changing Climate, and Extreme Weather of the Past and Future. Sobel, an atmospheric scientist and Columbia University Professor, recounts the growth of the storm and the predictions leading up to the disaster which were relied upon by elected officials, civic leaders and the general public.

 

Studies have shown that there is an approximate four to one benefit to cost ratio of investing in preventive measures, yet we lack the imagination to foresee the potential for disasters such as Sandy. Historically, we experience a disaster and then plan for the next event. However, with global warming gradually making its effects known, we may not realize the disaster in time to take effective measures. With this scenario, Sobel argues, “buying insurance after the flood will not work.” Development of low-lying areas, a rising sea level and climbing global temperatures will produce great environmental challenges. This will require broad cooperation between local, state and federal agencies and the private sector. Through clear-headed science, Sobel argues that we cannot afford to politicize an issue of such profound international importance as climate change. Storm Surge is a highly thought-provoking, engrossing tale of nature at her most destructive. It is also a story of human nature, and how we react, or fail to react, to our environment and its demands.

 

Dr. Sobel received his PhD in meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a tenured professor at Columbia University. He has won several major awards, including the David and Lucile Packard Fellowship, the Meisinger Award from the American Meteorological Society, the AXA Award in climate and extreme weather and the Ascent Award from the American Geophysical Union.

Leanne