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Ninth City Burning

posted by: November 14, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Ninth City BurningNinth City Burning by J. Patrick Black is the first installment of a new series that takes an exciting and refreshing approach to the aliens attacking Earth story. Set 500 years in the future, the people of Earth have been in a grinding war with a mysterious alien species. With them came the mysterious force of "thelemity", which they brought to use as a weapon. Luckily, humans found that they could use thelemity too.

 

Black introduces us to a variety of characters that, through their multiple viewpoints, build up this multifaceted and detail-rich story. Jax is a 12-year-old "fontani", someone who can use the mysterious element of thelemity and plays an important part in the defense of the Ninth City. Torro is a factory worker in a settlement of the Ninth City who is chosen in a sudden draft for the war. Naomi and Rae are sisters that travel and live outside of the city who end up becoming much more important to the Ninth City than they could have known. Though these are just a few of the characters who lend their viewpoints, we learn the truths of the war and their part in it as each of them train and prepare for battle.

 

Black’s future Earth is wonderfully imagined with sharp attention to detail. Many things aren’t what you think they are initially, and the twists in the story add an air of mystery that I was not expecting. Lovers of science fiction and fantasy will find Ninth City Burning intriguing and intense in the best possible way. Be sure to keep an eye out for the rest of the series.


 
 

New Next Week on November 15, 2016

posted by: November 11, 2016 - 11:00am

The following titles will be released next week. Select any title to learn more or to request a copy. Be sure to visit our Hot Titles webpage for more exciting upcoming titles.

Cover art for Absolutely on Music Cover art for Assassination Generation Cover art for Bellevue Cover art for Brothers at Arms Cover art for Domino Cover art for Forever Words Cover art for The Godfather Cover art for Hound of the Sea Cover art for I Loved Her in the Movies Cover art for Just Getting Started Cover art for Last Girl Before the Freeway Cover art for Lucky Bastard Cover art for A Matter of Honor Cover art for The Mistletoe Secret Cover art for No Man's LandCover art for Odessa Sea Cover art for Our Revolution Cover art for The Platinum Age of Television Cover art for Rasputin Cover art for Ray & Joan Cover art for Ruler of the Night Cover art for Scrappy Little Nobody Cover art for Settle For More Cover art for Shakespeare Cover art for The Sleeping Beauty Killer Cover art for Snake Cover art for The Spy Cover art for Success Is the Only Option Cover art for Swing Time Cover art for Testimony Cover art for They Can't Kill Us All Cover art for Tranny Cover art for Turbo Twenty-Three Cover art for Twenty-Six Seconds Cover art for The Unnatural WorldCover art for The Vanquished Cover art for A Voice in the NightCover art for Wonderland Cover art for Writing to Save A Life


 
 

And the Trees Crept In

posted by: November 10, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for And the Trees Crept InAnd the Trees Crept In by Dawn Kurtagich is a psychological teen thriller that captures the author’s talent for the spooky and terrifying. The sequel to The Dead House, this novel takes the reader into the depths of something very sinister, and will scare the pants off of anyone who picks up this book. At times visually poetic, Kurtagich creates a world full of mystery and proves that the true meaning of terror may exist in the darkest corners of our imagination.

 

With a knock — more like a loud bang — two sisters mysteriously arrive at the front door of an estranged relative known as “Crazy” Aunt Cathy. After years of abuse, 13-year-old Silla and 4-year-old Nori have run out of options and make a daring escape in search of a safe haven. Far away from civilization, Silla quickly realizes that there are many secrets buried within what is known as “La Baume,” and that they are very much alone and very much cursed.

 

If you don't mind a decent scare or are interested in something that isn't wrapped up with a pretty ribbon, this is for you. For those who just can’t get enough of horror and suspense, you may also want to try The Forest of Hands and Teeth, or listen to Odyssey Award-winner, Scowler.

 


 
 

Between the Covers is proud to introduce our newest feature, Popcorn Reviews with BCPL — a TV and movie review blog from our own BCPL blogger, Qayoe! Popcorn Reviews with BCPL highlights DVDs that you can find right now at BCPL...for free! Watch the first video below. To find the titles reviewed in this episode, visit our catalog and reserve your DVDs today.

 


 
 

Trials of the Earth

posted by: November 8, 2016 - 6:00am

Cover art for Trials of the EarthMary Mann Hamilton lived through it all on the frontier of the Mississippi Delta. Later in life, with the encouragement of a family friend, she wrote her story down in Trials of the Earth: The True Story of a Pioneer Woman and entered it into a contest for publication. Thankfully, despite losing the contest the transcript eventually made its way to publication.

 

American history is presented undiluted by the lens of the modern historian or reimagined into a more relatable tale, where disease strikes once, neighbors aren’t constantly trying to swindle and cheat each other and children don’t make sport of shooting at escaped convicts. Hamilton presents her life in a very manner of fact fashion, to the point where her arduous daily tasks almost seem manageable. Whether it is cooking breakfast for an entire tree-felling labor camp, tending to infirm family members, keeping her head and that of her children above the rising flood waters or convincing her husband to indulge in his vice only in the privacy of their home, Mary Hamilton details an intense tale of another time.

 

Her direct style is a clear result of the frontier life that left no time for woolgathering or money to indulge in extravagances. It makes for a fascinating, unrelenting read you won't be able to put down. If you enjoyed either of the novels One Thousand White Women by Jim Fergus or The Kitchen House by Kathleen Grissom, you should consider checking out this memoir.

 


 
 

The Wicked Boy

posted by: November 7, 2016 - 6:00am

The Wicked BoyAs the turn of the 20th century neared, many London newspapers hawked the frenetic belief madness, criminality and disease plagued the lower classes more so than at any other time in history, thus endangering not only the future of the Kingdom but of the human race. When young Robert Coombes stabbed his sleeping mother to death and hired an addled-minded adult to help pawn the family’s belongings, no newspaper missed the opportunity to horrify the nation. Compounding the natural repulsion of matricide, Robert, his younger brother and their self-selected guardian enjoyed games of Cowboys and Indians in the backyard while Emily Coombes’ corpse rotted away in the upstairs bedroom. Kate Summerscale unwinds the facts and lies twisted into the half-truths printed at the time in The Wicked Boy: The Mystery of a Victorian Child Murderer.

 

Throughout the trial, much was made about how the lowbrow “penny dreadfuls” Robert read had influenced him, and the possibility that the shape of his head or the size of his brain might have affected his emotional state. Little attention was paid to the home environment or family unit. The science of the day deemed Robert to be insane at the time he committed the act. Summerscale follows Robert out of the Holloway Jail to the aptly named Murder’s Paradise at the Broadmoor Asylum, through his release and emigration to Australia, into the trenches of War World I and to an almost cosmic final purpose.

 

Bereaved fans of Ann Rule and anyone not so patiently waiting for the perpetually in development theatrical version of The Devil in the White City will enjoy this page-turner.


 
 

The Book That Matters Most

posted by: November 3, 2016 - 7:00am

The Book That Matters MostIt isn’t unusual for readers to have special books, favorites kept close to our hearts which entertain, inspire and, sometimes, offer an escape. In Ann Hood’s newest novel, The Book That Matters Most, a mother and daughter both seek refuge in the world of the written word.

 

Ava Tucker’s life is falling apart. Her loving husband just left her for a ridiculous woman known as the yarn bomber, her father has dementia and her wild child daughter Maggie is incommunicado while supposedly in Italy on a college semester abroad program. A coveted spot in the neighborhood library’s book club opens up and even that goes sour; Ava tries to impress the group by blurting out that the author of her book choice has agreed to visit the club, when in reality she has no idea if the woman is even alive. Mother and daughter are both struggling; as Ava deals with the unraveling of life as she knows it, Maggie’s ditched her school program and instead is descending into heroin addiction while being “kept” by an older married man in Paris, who is both alienating her from her family and facilitating her drug abuse.

 

The book club’s theme is, actually, the book that matters most. Most members choose hoary classics like The Great Gatsby or Pride and Prejudice, but Ava’s choice, From Clare to Here, is an obscure title gifted to her as a child after a tragedy ripped her family apart and is a title she reread incessantly for comfort. As Hood alternates telling the stories of Ava and Maggie, she gradually reveals the secret of the real “book that matters most” and its pivotal role in the Tucker family. To explore more books about books, try Nina George’s The Little Paris Bookshop or The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler.


 
 

Collecting the Dead

posted by: November 2, 2016 - 7:00am

Collecting the DeadMagnus “Steps” Craig uses his secret tracking abilities to locate the missing in Spencer Kope’s debut novel Collecting the Dead. Steps is one member of an elite three-man Special Tracking Unit of the FBI. He has a kind of sixth sense; he can see the substance of a person, something he calls “shine” — a colorful glow which every person leaves behind. His ability is known to only three people: his father, the director of the FBI and his partner, Special Agent Jimmy Donovan.

 

When the remains of yet another murdered woman are discovered, Magnus recognizes the shine left by the perpetrator from a previous crime. He also discovers the murderer’s trademark at both scenes — the mark of a sad face. At the same time, a killer known as Leonardo, who Magnus has been tracking for several years, has resurfaced and is taunting him. While desperately digging for a clue that will lead him to Leonardo, the case of the Sad Face Killer intensifies. The team identifies 11 potential victims — all missing women who fit the same scenario. While Magnus draws on all of his exceptional skills, he struggles with the pressure and guilt of knowing he is the only one who can save the next victim before it’s too late.

 

Author Spencer Kope is a professional crime analyst and his background provides strong authenticity. Kope’s debut novel introduces a sympathetic hero in a unique storyline. Fans of Walt Longmire, Jack Reacher and Charlie Parker will find Collecting the Dead a deeply satisfying read.


 
 

Chilling Adventures of Sabrina

posted by: November 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Chilling Adventures of SabrinaMeet Sabrina Spellman. She’s the new girl at school, dealing with the typical problems of dating, peer pressure and trying to get a part in the school play. But now that she’s turning 16, she faces an even more important rite of passage — signing her name in the Devil’s book. Wait, what? Chilling Adventures of Sabrina by author Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa and illustrator Robert Hack embraces historical depictions of witchcraft, goat sacrifices and all, in its depiction of the usually jolly witch from Archie Comics. So ’90s nostalgists beware: This Sabrina resembles Melissa Joan Hart about as much as Melissa Joan Hart resembles Black Phillip from the film The Witch.

 

This companion series to the similarly horrific Afterlife with Archie is just as satisfying but more subtle and psychological, with allusions to Shirley Jackson and Ray Bradbury in place of Sam Raimi and George Romero. But both series deserve to be read if for no other reason than they’re the only horror stories that you can read and witness the characters being traumatized or mutilated, and then go and can revisit with the original Archie and his gang getting ice cream and having a swell time as a chaser in the Archie Superstar series.

 

This collection also includes a reprint of the original Madam Satan series from the ’40s in which the title character seduces men and kills them with a kiss, while an angelic monk on a donkey attempts to thwart her from leading men away from the path of righteousness. It really is something. You’d think an old man on a donkey isn’t quite the hard sell that a supernaturally attractive bride of Satan is, but you’d be surprised.


 
 

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