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Fall and Winter Book Buzz

posted by: December 14, 2016 - 7:00am

BCPL Book BuzzLooking for the next good book to read or a perfect holiday gift? BCPL librarians shared some of their most anticipated books coming out this fall and winter with customers at Book Buzz sessions around the county.  It’s always hard to pick, but the librarians did come up with these favorites, already popular with so many readers.

 

Two iconic leaders are featured in our nonfiction picks. Candice Millard offers a fascinating account of Winston Churchill’s experiences during the Boer War in Hero of the Empire and Julia Baird uses the journals of Queen Victoria to shed light on the monarch in Victoria: The Queen: An Intimate Biography of the Woman Who Ruled an Empire.

 

Among the many exciting fiction titles released this fall and winter are this diverse group. The Heart of Henry Quantum by Pepper Harding explores contemporary middle-aged relationships, telling the story from three perspectives — a husband, a wife and the “one who got away.” Thriller fans will devour Holly Brown’s This Is Not Over, a story of two women caught in an escalating game of cat and mouse using hidden secrets in a psychological battle that leads to an explosive ending. Ann Patchett’s Commonwealth is a beautifully written novel that crosses generations and looks at the random events that have the biggest impact on our lives. Another family story that explores how one decision can shape lives is The Mothers, an unforgettable debut novel by Brit Bennett, my favorite of this season.


 
 

Between the Covers is proud to present Popcorn Reviews with BCPL — a TV and movie review blog from our own BCPL blogger, Qayoe! Popcorn Reviews with BCPL highlights DVDs that you can find right now at BCPL...for free! To find the titles reviewed in this episode, visit our catalog and reserve your DVDs today.

 

 


 
 

Ghosts

posted by: December 12, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for GhostsMany readers will be surprised to learn that Raina Telgemeier is one of the most successful graphic novelists working today. Her comics may not be the stuff of spectacular blockbuster movie adaptations, but she has an uncanny eye for the subtleties of school age friendships, romantic relationships and the pain of braces (which hits especially close to home for me). She connects with readers — especially young ones — and this has led to her books outselling popular comics like The Walking Dead or whichever superhero book Marvel or DC are pushing this week. Telgemeier outpaces them with personal, self-contained stories about children and, with her new book Ghosts, Telgemeier has taken yet another step forward as a storyteller. Retaining her signature warmth and breezy humor, her subjects now include death, family illness and ghosts.

 

Ghosts follows a family who’s just moved to Bahía de la Luna, a seaside town whose ocean air is especially good for Maya, the youngest daughter who has cystic fibrosis. But the protagonist of the story is Catrina, Maya’s older teenage sister.

 

Maya is a classic child, silly and wise. She has a peace with the world that’s hard to retain when you become Catrina’s age. But Bahía de la Luna is not your average town, and the girls begin spotting ghosts and real-life spooky, scary skeletons. Maya has questions for the ghosts, but Catrina is terrified of them and the uncomfortable feelings they stir up about her sister’s health. Through many lessons, Catrina will learn that inviting ghosts into her life may be the healthiest thing she can do.

 

Ghosts is the perfect all-ages read, full of beautiful landscapes, cartoonish humor and wisdom. Leave it to Telgemeier to take the heaviest of subject matter and make it jovial.

 


 
 

BCPL Top Titles of 2016

posted by: December 8, 2016 - 7:00am

Finish out this year's BCPL Reading Challenge with Collection Development's Top Titles for 2016. Stay tuned for our upcoming blogger favorites of 2016!

 

Fiction 

Cover art for Before the Fall  Cover art for A Great Reckoning Cover art for Homegoing Cover art for Lily and the Octopus Cover art for Sweetbitter Cover art for Swing Time Cover art for The Trespasser Cover art for The Underground Railroad  Cover art for The Wangs vs. The World Cover art for The Whole Town's Talking

 

Nonfiction 

Cover art for Eight Flavors Cover art for Evicted Cover art for Hero of the Empire Cover art for Hillbilly Elegy Cover art for How to Be Here Cover art for Hungry Heart Cover art for The Mathews Men Cover art for Sing for Your Life Cover art for Truevine Cover art for Victoria the Queen

 

Romance 

Cover art for Because of Miss Bridgerton Cover art for Forbidden Cover art for The Good, the Bad, and the Vampire Cover art for Haunted Destiny Cover art for Her Darkest Nightmare Cover art for In Bed With the Billionaire Cover art for Jordan's Return Cover art for Lady Bridget's Diary Cover art for Magnate Cover art for The Trouble With Mistletoe

 

Kids 

Cover art for The Best Man Cover art for Ghost Cover art for Juana & Lucas Cover art for PAX Cover art for The Plot to Kill Hitler Cover art for Raymie Nightingale Cover art for Snow White Cover art for Vietnam: A History of WarCover art for When the Sea Turned to Silver Cover art for The Wild Robot  

 

Teen 

Cover art for Burn Baby Burn Cover art for Haikyu! Cover art for Lucy and Linh Cover art for Outrun the Moon Cover art for The Passion of Dolssa Cover art for The Serpent King Cover art for The Sun Is Also a Star Cover art for Unbecoming Cover art for We Are Still Tornadoes Cover art for We Are the Ants  

 

Picture Book 

Cover art for Before Morning Cover art for Best in Snow Cover art for Grumpy Pants Cover art for Ideas are All Around Cover art for Jazz Day Cover art for The Journey Cover art for School's First Day of SchoolCover art for Skunk on a String Cover art for We Found a Hat Cover art for When Green Becomes Tomatoes

 

Music CD 

Cover art for American Band Cover art for Blackstar Cover art for Cleopatra Cover art for Here Cover art for Joanne Cover art for Lemonade Cover art for Love you to Death Cover art for Malibu Cover art for Untitled Unmastered

 


 
 

Flying Eye Books

posted by: December 7, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Smart About SharksCover art for One Day on Our Blue Planet…in the Antarctic Call me superficial, but I love a really pretty book. This is especially true for children’s books. What better way to lure young readers in than an eye-catching cover or page after page of cool illustrations? Of course, in order to truly live up to my exacting standards, it must have some substance too. I've recently become obsessed with Flying Eye Books, an imprint of Nobrow Press because they never disappoint me. They are always stylishly composed and fun to read.

 

Smart About Sharks by Owen Davey is an amazing example of nonfiction for children. It presents readers with weird and fascinating facts as well as lots of practical information on things like shark anatomy, social habits and even some of the mythology surrounding this mysterious predator. The author includes a section on species endangerment and simple ways to keep their habitats safe. However, the illustrations really steal the spotlight. Each page is like a print I would hang in my house, featuring underwater scenes and infographics that are as useful as they are nice to look at. They are especially useful for helping young readers make sense of all the information. My favorite panel shows a kayaker paddling at the top of the page with an assortment of sharks in the water beneath, all drawn to scale. It is a great way to begin to imagine how many differences there can be in one species.

 

One Day on Our Blue Planet…in the Antarctic is a picture book that introduces kids to a day in the life of a penguin named Adélie, also the name of a common species of penguin living on the Antarctic coast. Through her adventures, author Ella Bailey teaches us about the other animals in Adélie's habitat, like seals, whales, squids and krill. The sentences are simple and sparse, but children will discover a ton of information about life in Antarctica through the illustrations. While they are stylistically simple, there is so much cool stuff happening on each page, it's sure to pique young readers’ interest. The end pages also feature each of the species making an appearance along with its name.

 

These two stylish books are great for kids interested in the natural world, and they are sure to prompt further investigation. Both are part of a series, so be sure to check out other works from these authors.


 
 

Truly Madly Guilty

posted by: December 5, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Truly Madly GuiltyWhat could possibly go wrong at an ordinary neighborhood barbecue? In Liane Moriarty’s latest novel Truly Madly Guilty, we meet three families left reeling after a horrible occurrence at a friendly backyard get-together.

 

Set in the suburbs of Sydney, Australia, Truly Madly Guilty follows thirtysomething Clementine, a freelance cellist preparing to audition with the Sydney orchestra; Erika, Clementine’s very organized and slightly OCD childhood friend; and Tiffany, Erika’s sultry next door neighbor who has a secret past.

 

 
Clementine is married to Sam and has two young daughters, Holly and Ruby. Clementine and Sam once had a loving and communicative relationship, but now they barely speak to each other. They both feel guilty and blame each other for what happened at the barbecue. Erika, who plans everything, is the child of a hoarder and lives a structured and organized life with her socially anxious husband Oliver. Erika accidently became intoxicated during the barbecue, leading her to question her recollections of what happened that night. Meanwhile, the hosts of the unfortunate barbecue are fun-loving and carefree couple Vid and Tiffany. Though they have seemingly moved on from what took place in their backyard that day, their 10-year-old daughter Dakota has been acting strangely lately, showing symptoms of depression.

 

Told through interwoven narratives, Moriarty flips back and forth between the present-day barbecue and the day of the tragedy. The story gradually builds to what actually happened, keeping readers guessing until the heart wrenching reveal. Truly Madly Guilty encompasses elements of both mystery and suspense, but is ultimately an examination of adult friendships, the fragility of marriages and the way feelings of guilt can overtake our lives.

 


 
 

Fight Club 2

posted by: December 1, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Fight Club 2You always wanted a sequel, and here it is. Dark, weird, confusing and fascinating are all words to describe this head-bending follow up. What Chuck Palahniuk began in Fight Club, he brings full circle in Fight Club 2, and he does so with panache.

 

The book starts several years into the future. The Narrator is now married to Marla, and they have a child. But things are not as joyful as they seem. There are worms in the apple, and things start to fall apart quickly. Palahniuk’s prose is seductive and grand; he posits ideas and immediately pivots to shred them. How powerful is an idea; can it survive the thinker? Can it pass from one generation to the next? These are the sorts of questions that Fight Club 2 demands we answer, all while it assails us with an ideology of violent revolution that’s intended to free our souls from this corporate purgatory we inhabit. Certainly, this book makes clear above anything else that Tyler Durden’s nihilistic philosophy is as juvenile as it is empty.

 

In the end, the questions will linger longer than the answers, and the reader may be left wondering if anything was really answered at all. But for diehard Palahniuk and Fight Club fans, this is a must read regardless. All you can do is strap in and enjoy one more wild ride. If you enjoyed this and you haven’t read the original, you absolutely should pick it up and give it a read.

 

If you’re a graphic novel fan, you should also consider Alan Moore’s V for Vendetta, another tale of violent revolution. For something a little less violent, Scott McCloud’s The Sculptor tells the story of a young man whose story goes from mundane to mystical and poses a lot of similar questions about our lives and what they mean. Fans of the original book should consider Brett Easton Ellis’s American Psycho, which similarly examines the sort of corporate prisons we build and what they do to us, or Charles Heller’s Catch-22, which take a little more roundabout route to examining man’s inhumanity to man and the effects of that violence on the soul.


 
 

Between the Covers with Gary Vikan

posted by: November 30, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Sacred and StolenCrooked dealers. Forgeries. Thefts. Looted antiquities. Readers will find it all in Gary Vikan’s highly readable and entertaining new memoir, Sacred and Stolen: Confessions of a Museum Director. The distinguished medieval scholar and former director of the Walters Art Museum recently answered questions for Between the Covers in advance of his book talk at the Hereford Branch on December 4 at 2 p.m.

 

Between the Covers: Your new memoir, Sacred and Stolen: Confessions of a Museum Director, provides an insightful, often humorous look behind the scenes of the art world. What prompted you to share these stories with the public?

 

Gary Vikan: Over the years I became increasingly interested, as I gave tours of the Walters, in telling the stories behind the works of art — stories that are distinct from their art-historical narrative. Most works have a story, many are very interesting — and some straight-out scandalous.

 

BTC: Shady dealings, sketchy characters, stolen art — you cover it all. Did you worry you were saying too much?

 

GV: Not at all. Maybe not enough. My lectures on the book can go into that other territory.

 

BTC: Museums have to connect with people. How has the art experience for the public changed since you got into the business?

 

GV: I initially thought my job was to educate my audience. Now I think my job is to listen to my audience, and to meet them where they are. Ideally, I can create for them a setting in which works of art of the past can do their magic.

 

BTC: From 1994 to 2013, you were the director of the Walters Art Museum. What accomplishments are you most proud?

 

GV: We went free in 2006. That is what museums should be: FREE.

 

BTC: Of all the exhibitions you’ve curated during your career, do you have a favorite?

 

GV: Yes, Holy Image, Holy Space: Icons and Frescoes from Greece in 1988. It was the first major icon show in the U.S., and it was the first time I was able to empower the works fully in my installation.. People kissed the Plexiglas of the cases containing the icons.

 

BTC: You speak about the “Wild West” days of collecting when not a lot of questions were asked about the provenance of pieces. Where are we today with the trail of looted antiquities and threat to the world’s cultural heritage?

 

GV: We’re in what I call the “Post-Loot” age. I can tell that by what is NOT coming out of Syria and Iraq. Like our tobacco culture, our loot culture has changed profoundly over the last 30 years.

 

BTC: What do you see as the next challenges for museums?

 

GV: Being meaningful for audiences, and playing a meaningful role in addressing social justice and social ills. To be a player in healing.

 

BTC: You have a knack for telling an engaging story. Are there any plans to write a fictional whodunit set in the art world?

 

GV: Nope, because my reality is stranger than fiction. My next book is titled: The Shroud: Case Closed. And guess what, I prove the Shroud of Turin is a FAKE!


 
 

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