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New Picture Books for Spring

It's Only Stanley by Jon AgeePlease, Mr. Panda by Steve AntonyLast Stop on Market Street by Matt de la PenaStanley the beagle's family is awakened throughout the night by what they believe are his normal ‘handydog’ activities. As each of the four children go to their parents' room to investigate the strange noises they hear, their father assures them that It's Only Stanley. But this is no ordinary night. Author Jon Agee's usual over-the-top events and humorous illustrations will appeal to the intended audience.

 

Although Mr. Panda seems apathetic when offering colorful donuts to his black-and-white animal friends, he has a method to his madness. One by one, those who want a donut are refused, until a bright-eyed lemur remembers the magic word. A manners book that isn’t preachy, Please, Mr. Panda by Steve Antony is a perfectly silly reminder to young children. Stark but inviting illustrations match the minimalist text.

 

In Last Stop on Market Street by Matt de la Peña, CJ and his grandmother leave church every Sunday and wait for the bus. But this Sunday CJ, has a lot of questions for his caregiver, wondering why they don’t have a car, why they have to go to church and why a blind man cannot see. Each time his grandmother answers with the wisdom of experience and age. Christian Robinson’s bright and child-friendly illustrations are a perfect match for the urban setting of this contemporary and diverse tale.

Todd

 
 

The First Bad Man

The First Bad Man

posted by:
April 20, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The First Bad ManMiranda July is an extraordinary artist capable of channeling her creativity into any medium, and her debut novel The First Bad Man surpasses the ambitiousness of her fantastic short collection No One Belongs Here More Than You. In The First Bad Man, July makes a mockery of relationship conventions and proves through her quirky, heavily flawed characters that for love to exist, it simply needs to be felt.

 

Manic, obsessive, middle-aged Cheryl works from home for a nonprofit women’s self-defense studio. Her bosses Carl and Suzanne are looking for a volunteer to shelter their obstinate daughter Clee who is in desperate need of a change of scenery, but they’re met with little enthusiasm around the office. So when Clee shows up on Cheryl’s doorstep with her stuff, neither she nor Cheryl is prepared for how violently their disparate worlds are about to collide. At first, the two avoid each other when they’re both home, but once they’re forced to acknowledge how weird this is, the avoidance devolves into nightly wrestling matches inspired by the self-defense exercises constituting their livelihoods. Ritual gives way to shame, which cycles back to anger between the estranged housemates, and it takes a grounding realization for Clee to feel open to reconciliation with Cheryl. Will their relationship bloom into something even more complex and beautiful, or break down like everything else in their lives has?

 

Cheryl and Clee waver between the roles of optimist and pessimist, offsetting the absurdity of their situation with a sense of “I guess it could happen” realism. With a supporting cast including a pair of psychiatrists with more problems than their clientele and a philanderer who needs a spiritual permission slip to do his thing, The First Bad Man is a strangely perverse, endearing and memorable warping of the tale of two people united by calamity.

Tom

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I’ll Have What She’s Having

I’ll Have What She’s Having

posted by:
April 17, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for I'll Have What She's HavingHave you ever wondered how Beyoncé stays so thin? Or what is Victoria Beckham’s secret to her svelte frame? Well, so did Rebecca Harrington, and in her book I’ll Have What She’s Having: My Adventures in Celebrity Dieting, she dishes up some interesting insights into the nutritional habits of the stars. In order to discover how effective her subjects' diets were, Harrington tested each one herself. Granted, her approach was not scientific — she only spent about a week on each diet and often times did not stick to the regime — but her compilation of her experiences makes for some entertaining reading.

 

The celebrities profiled range from the contemporary to the classic, and the diets range from the fairly sensible to the extraordinarily weird. Among the ones that seem not too off-the-wall is Gwyneth Paltrow’s — who Harrington gushes about throughout the book — vegan lifestyle and recipes which are palatable, if expensive to prepare. Then there is the yeast-centered diet of Greta Garbo or Dolly Parton’s Cabbage Soup Diet or even Victoria Beckham’s Five Hands Diet. As Harrington explains, Beckham apparently advocates eating five handfuls of food a day and “then for some unknown reason you declare yourself full.”

 

Harrington’s witty comments and occasional barbs are the real heart of the book. She doesn't really offer any serious insights into which diet is the best or the worst, instead she points out just how obsessed our culture is with trying to emulate celebrities. Harrington’s book may not cause you to lose any weight, but it will offer you a light and amusing read.

Regina

 
 

The Zoo at the Edge of the World

The Zoo at the Edge of the World

posted by:
April 16, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Zoo at the End of the WorldMarlin Rackham comes from a proud lineage. His father is one of the great explorers, the conqueror and defender of the jungle of South America. Ronan Rackham owns The Zoo at the Edge of the World, a collection of jungle animals built on a temple in British Guiana. Unfortunately for Marlin, he has a severe stutter and can only clearly speak to the animals around him. When his father brings a jaguar out of the jungle, suddenly the animals are able to talk back. Author Eric Kahn Gale asks big questions while crafting a story that is more Heart of Darkness than Doctor Dolittle.

 

Marlin's life isn't easy. His brother is an unmitigated bully. His father is a legend. Everyone thinks he's an idiot because he can't speak. When a powerful duke brings his family to the zoo and a man-eating jaguar is captured for exhibition, Marlin gets caught in the middle of British colonial politics. What is a boy to do when he can't speak, but understands entire sides to the conflicts that no one else is even aware of?

 

The tour program is interspersed regularly, providing a counterpoint to what actually happens in the story at any time. As the zoo goes farther and farther off schedule, the attempt to write puff pieces becomes ludicrous. This is a delightfully dark children’s book recommended for readers of Kipling's The Jungle Book. It's frightening and realistic, and follows the implications of its magic through. In a world where animals can talk across species lines, they still need to eat each other.

Matt

 
 

This Is the Life

This Is the Life

posted by:
April 15, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for This Is the LifeWhen do we know the people we love best? When things are easy or when life doesn't turn out as we expect? In Alex Shearer’s new novel This Is the Life, we meet two brothers who have been estranged for some time. When one of the brothers, Louis, is diagnosed with a brain tumor, they are reunited under difficult-to-navigate circumstances. Our narrator discovers Louis, whom he thought he knew, is so much more, but is the Louis in his brain a better version of the man himself?

 

Loosely based on his own life experience when his brother was diagnosed with terminal cancer, Shearer may be writing about himself as the brother who frequently gets frustrated with Louis’ situation, treatment and odd behavior. Shearer uses a jumping timeline to compare the Louis of the past and the Louis of the present — the stark contrast between the functioning Louis and the Louis in the hospice highlights how quickly and devastatingly cancer can render someone so helpless.

 

This is not a sentimental look at family members going through illness together, but a brutally honest account of the “little things” that no one reveals when confronted with terminal illness. Day-to-day operations such as haircuts, grocery shopping, paying bills and cleaning become almost impossible; further down-the-line tasks like writing a will and long-term hospice care are even more daunting. It's this honesty that makes the book successful. There are no punches pulled here. Each frustration and set back is out in the open. It reminds us that while those who are sick will of course receive the most attention and care, there exists a network of caregivers who may also be suffering and need resources.

 

Those who are looking for solidarity in a character navigating the hardship of caring for someone, or fans of Anna Quindlen’s One True Thing or We Are All Welcome Here by Elizabeth Berg will find a captivating story in the pages of this novel.

Jessica

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Vanishing Girls

Vanishing Girls

posted by:
April 14, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Vanishing GirlsLauren Oliver’s latest novel Vanishing Girls, is told from the perspective of two sisters: Nick, short for Nicole, and Dara. Nick and Dara have always been close — that is, until the accident that leaves Dara with a nasty scar and the sisters emotionally distant. Vanishing Girls is a mysterious novel filled with suspense and a bit of romance.

 

The story begins before the accident that ruins their relationship when Nick is simply worried about her party-girl younger sister. However, it quickly jumps to after the accident when their lives have fallen to pieces. After living with her father for a few months after the accident, Nick moves home with her mother and Dara again. Dara, however, does whatever she can to avoid Nick, staying in her room all day and sneaking out of the house at night. Meanwhile, their mom forces Nick to work at the local amusement park, Fantasy Land. There, Nick reconnects with her former best friend and Dara’s ex-boyfriend, Parker. As Nick falls into the routine of work, her friendship with Parker picks up where it left off before the accident. But when Madeline Snow disappears, followed by Dara a few days later, Nick investigates the suspicious disappearances and learns that her sister had more secrets than she thought — secrets that may connect her to Madeline Snow.

 

Vanishing Girls is a suspenseful story that will keep readers guessing until the very end. Fans of E. Lockhart’s We Were Liars will enjoy this new novel from Lauren Oliver.

Laura

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“No More Half-Measures, Walter.”

Baking BadIn the vacuum following the series finale of Breaking Bad, it stands to reason that the show’s addicts will scramble for another fix wherever they can find it. For some, Better Call Saul is enough. For this particular addict, that scramble led unexpectedly to the pages of Baking Bad: A Parody in a Cookbook by Walter Wheat.

 

Baking Bad cakeA sweet journey through some of the show’s most classic episodes, the recipes in Baking Bad are generously garnished with references to those more compelling moments in the series that first hooked its audience. Including recipes for Meth Crunchies, Mr. White’s Tighty Whitey Bites and Fring Pops, the desserts produced are unmistakably unique, calling forth specific people and scenes in the show.

 

Replete with clever puns, tongue-in-cheek references throughout each recipe and some exquisite illustrations of the completed desserts, Baking Bad is definitely deserving of a prominent place on any Breaking Bad enthusiast’s coffee table. But is it a must have in the kitchen as well? As a distinctly amateur cook and an even more hesitant baker, I wondered if the exquisite works of art bedecking the pages were actually achievable without sacrificing my sanity. Steering clear of any recipes requiring an abundance of fondant or special tools like sugar thermometers, I put some of the simpler recipes to the test. My best result? (See picture to the right.)

 

Ricin Krispies Squares: The results were mighty tasty and surprisingly true in appearance to the results predicted in the book.

 

Those hoping to find inspiration for a Breaking Bad-themed party will definitely find what they’re looking for. While most of the recipes are complicated enough to merit look-don’t-eat centerpiece status, Baking Bad does also include a few higher-yield recipes like the above-pictured that should satisfy guests with an appetite.

Meghan

 
 

Face of a Monster

Face of a Monster

posted by:
April 10, 2015 - 7:00am

At the Water's EdgeAt the Water’s Edge by Sara Gruen is a deeply poignant story of love, friendship and the true rewards of life.

 

Madeline Hyde is a member of high society, and as such, it is expected that she and her husband deport themselves with at least a little dignity. But Maddie and her husband Ellis, along with their best friend Hank, enjoy an extravagant lifestyle filled with parties and pranks. One fateful New Year’s Eve night in 1945, they go too far and the disgrace is too much for Ellis’ parents. Maddie and Ellis are thrown out of the parent’s palatial home and forced to live on a pittance. Determined to get back into his father’s good graces, Ellis plots to redeem his father’s reputation. For Colonel Hyde has a scandal of his own; he claimed to see the Loch Ness Monster, and all of his evidence was later proved fraudulent. Designated physically unfit for military duty, Ellis and Hank are free to pursue their mad scheme, achieve fame and work their way back into Ellis’ fortune.

 

Ellis, Maddie and Hank endure a perilous sea voyage and arrive at a remote Scottish village to encounter the reality of war-torn Europe. Abandoned by Ellis and Hank for weeks at a time, Maddie discovers rationing, shortages and “making do or do without.” Left to her own devices, Maddie is enlightened to some harsh truths and forms genuine relationships. She also discovers that not all monsters are at the water’s edge.

 

Sara Gruen is a magical storyteller, immersing the reader in visions of extreme privilege and desperate hardship. This is a riveting tale of self-discovery, an examination of female friendship and the effects of of war on a small community. Sara Gruen is the #1 New York Times and USA Today bestselling author of Water for Elephants, Ape House, Riding Lessons and Flying Changes.

Leanne

 
 

The Hills Are Alive

The Hills Are Alive

posted by:
April 9, 2015 - 7:00am

The Sound of Music StoryThe Sound of Music had its film debut 50 years ago and The Sound of Music Story by Tom Santopietro is the book for any fan of this beloved Rogers and Hammerstein movie musical. Details abound about filming in Austria and Hollywood, and the book also includes new interviews with production insiders.

 

As is appropriate, Santopietro starts at the very beginning with an insider’s view of the filming of the opening shot of the movie. While viewers recall the spirited Julie Andrews singing “The Sound of Music” while traipsing through the lush mountains of Austria, readers learn what it took to capture that magical moment, including Julie Andrews being blown to the ground by the crew helicopter! In detailing the behind-the-scenes machinations, Santopietro immediately highlights the financial and logistical challenges inherent in this production. Indeed, as intolerable as it is to imagine, this was a movie that almost didn’t make it to the big screen thanks to the flop that was Cleopatra.

 

Santopietro’s exhaustive examination of this cherished film includes the real life story of Maria von Trapp and the musical’s Broadway success. But it is the insider information from the movie which is most appealing. Picture if you will Angie Dickinson or Grace Kelly as Maria. How about David Niven or Bing Crosby as Captain von Trapp? Santopietro also studies the movie through the lens of history as the movie opened during the turbulent 1960s — there were strong questions about its appeal during an era of cynicism and protest. But succeed it did, as it was received well by the critics (Pauline Kael, be darned!), garnered 10 Oscar nominations, was the highest-grossing film of 1965 and is entrenched as a favorite thing to countless aficionados of all ages.

Maureen

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Murderous Manuscript

Murderous Manuscript

posted by:
April 8, 2015 - 7:00am

A Murder of MagpiesAuthor, journalist and former editor Judith Flanders has recently released A Murder of Magpies. This cozy London-based mystery has Flanders trading her more typical nonfiction writing for a witty whodunit novel.

 

Sam, an editor for a publishing house, finds that her pleasantly humdrum lifestyle has been turned upside down when her favorite gossip writer brings her a salacious manuscript. The book cites the illicit behaviors of the rich and famous. Shortly after receiving a copy, Sam’s life takes an unexpected turn for the worse.

 

When a bike courier is run down while carrying a copy of the manuscript, Jake, a handsome detective, seeks out Sam to see how the two are connected. After someone close to Sam goes missing, she puts on her sleuthing hat and works with Jake to find the culprit. Between the heat of adrenalin and the time together spent digging for clues, a romance ignites between Jake and Sam. Will Sam save her friend and get her banal life back?

 

A Murder of Magpies captures an even mix of effortless wit and downright detective spirit that will have you trying to figure out the mystery — if you pay enough attention, you just might. The novel is a colorful mashup of Bridget Jones and Sherlock Holmes.

Randalee